The Case of Kawasi Himde : Why should we educate our children about her case?

Kawasi Himde

Kawasi Himde is no celebrity or someone from a cosmopolitan city, she is a tribal woman. A few good media tried to cover her news still. Kudos to the ones who are holding the mic behind the screen to bring her story out. The rest of the NEWS media was busy in covering the IPL and Cinema gossips it seems. They may be right, audiences will show interest to watch a Salman Khan case that will help their TRP, which Kawasi cannot do.

She was acquitted after 7 years of imprisonment when a Dantewada (Chhattisgarh, India) court found her not guilty. Our judiciary system took JUST 7 years to find someone is innocent. At the age of 17, in 2008, Kawasi Himde was arrested for “being involved in the killing of 23 policemen”.

How our judiciary system is going to compensate everything she had lost? There are only loopholes but no law for this!

The real story is horrible even in our dreams. Colours of the Cage A blog covered her story exclusively in an attempt to expose the truth and to get her justice.

In January 2008 just after harvest, as in previous years, a fair was organised in Ramram, the nearby village. Kawasi accompanied her aunt and her other cousin sisters to the fair and to buy ribbons and choodis. There she joined a group of other tribals who were dancing and singing. Having danced vigorously, she soon became thirsty and approached the nearby hand-pump for water. But as soon as she held the pump, someone very forcefully grabbed her. She looked up angrily and was shocked to see Police personnel. They had surrounded her and began dragging her by her hair towards their vehicle parked outside the fair. With hands and feet tied, she was thrown on the floor of the truck and driven to the Police station. (click to continue reading) – Written by Sushmita Verma

Why should we educate our children about her case?

If you are reading this, you could be someone who works in a respectable position responsible for keeping the law, you could be an advocate, you could be a student, you could be an activist, you could be just a common civilian.. Whomsoever you are, as a human being we should have some introspection on ourselves as individuals and as a society.

What are we going behind? What are we supporting? How are we spending our time?

Thousands of cases like this are happening in our country which will not come to our attention. But at the end of the day, it is we all who make the society. Our children are going to become the lawyers, policeman, lawmakers, politicians, etc.

It is our responsibility to educate them the reality. So that they will understand everything and at least try to have some humanity and morality tomorrow. If not our generation at least coming generations may seek to live in the righteous way.

Please share this. Keep educating!


Courtesy : The Hindu,  Colours of the Cage and Satwik Mishra


Documentary : Inside ‘The White House’

Watch this Documentary narrated by Morgan Freeman… Know about White House.

The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States, located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C. It has been the residence of every U.S. president since John Adams in 1800.

Story : 47°C

47 Degrees Celsius

47°C, heat literally sucked away his energy. 1Km distance seemed like a marathon, when he reached the hotel for lunch.

A fresher, a small company, an unknown city, a rude boss and all the donkey works with no choice were the cursing ingredients of his life.

“Meals? 60 Rupees! No money? Then get out” the man at the billing table shouted at an old lady.

He looked at his purse – exactly 60 rupees and some coins.

He bought a meal token and gave to her. She reluctantly accepted.

He smiled and continued walking, the ATM was just three kilometers away.
____________________

- Din

Inspirational : Heroic Tale of Underprivileged Girls

Super Goats
She says she remembered the days she was slapped and sweep floors when she went to the Panchayat Office get birth certificates for her passport.
Why’s there no media coverage of this inspiring victory, is it because this was not cricket? Here is a heroic tale of ourunderprivileged girls, who made us proud despite all odds.Two weeks back, as a billion plus India slept, a handful of Jharkhand tribal girls proudly held aloft a trophy they won in their *maiden entry* in a football tournament in far-flung Spain.

They were the same girls who were slapped, kicked and made to sweep floors by arrogant bureaucrats in Jharkhand when the girls asked for birth certificates, a necessity to apply for passports.

It was the night of July 13. Hundreds of firecrackers lit the skies as the girls screamed Vande Mataram – their battle cry – for being placed third in the Gasteiz Cup, the world’s best testing ground for teenager football in Victoria Gastiez.

The girls were lovingly titled ‘The Supergoats’ by the organizers in Spain the moment they saw the girls playing barefoot in practice matches on arrival.
Why? Because the girls had limited football gear and could not take the risk of tampering it before the tournament. They were overawed by international teams in the first tournament, the Donosti Cup, but came to their own in the second tournament.

Offering a consolation prize for the third team – winner of a match between losing semi-finalists – was a mere formality for the organizers.But for the girls, it was a giant leap into global soccer from their impoverished Rukka village near Ranchi, considered one of the world’s epicenters of child marriage and human trafficking.

As soon as the announcement was made for the prize distribution ceremony, the girls rushed into their dressing room and returned, some barefoot, wearing red-bordered white saris, their traditional festive dress. Many had their plastic flowers in their hairs.

And when they huddled together after the mandatory photo session, some wept inconsolably because they had almost given up their hopes to participate in this tournament.

All India Football Federation (AIFF) president Praful Patel was not aware of the girls’ superlative achievement, nor was the country’s new sports minister Jitendra Singh.

“We could not sleep that night (July 13),” says Rinky Kumari, 13, captain of Supergoats. Once she bunked her school helped her mother do household chores. Today, thanks to football, everyone knows her name in the village.

She says she remembered the days she was slapped and sweep floors when she went to the Panchayat Office get birth certificates for her passport.

“ I do not remember the slap, I remember the Cup,” says Rinky. For her, and her teammates, it means a lot.

Courtesy: Source

Humanity : Counterattacking Discrimination

This is one intriguing as well as annoying incident happened in the Delhi Metro, shared by a Facebook user. He in fact was a fellow passenger who witnessed this and shared it with the world. Here it is in his words

” This morning I saw a well-dressed senior citizen, wearing Ray-Ban sun glasses, who boarded the Delhi Metro and went towards a pair of seats reserved for senior citizens. In it where two young boys in their early twenties; one was a well-dressed boy wearing a conspicuous headphone and listening to songs and the other was a boy who looked like a construction worker, wearing rubber slippers and slightly soiled due to some laborious task he had just completed.

The supposed construction worker had a dark complexion and was sleeping when the old man entered the metro. On seeing the old man, the boy with the headphones, immediately vacated his seat while the supposed construction worker, was still sleeping. The old man, woke him up and asked him to get up. Caught unaware, the boy saw the vacant seat next to him (because it had been vacated) and asked the old man to take that seat, but the old man refused and he insisted that the boy gets up so that he can sit with the boy wearing the headphones.

The supposed construction worker refused and told the old man that he can take the vacant seat. Suddenly, the old man turned caustic and told the boy that he is sleeping early in the morning and added that he must be from Bihar. He also added that he will take the boy to task in the next station.

The old man’s aversion to share a seat with someone whom he thought doesn’t fit his stature was so evident and quite nauseating. Unperturbed by the retort and the gaze of the onlookers, the dark complexioned boy firmly said that it doesn’t matter where he is from, he knows what his rights are, and he isn’t scared of the old man’s intimidation.

The old man grudgingly took the seat next to the boy and the boy continued sitting with a calm demeanor. A few stations later, when a lady boarded the train, the young boy vacated the seat for her and the old man looked like a fool. The boy’s response and his confidence levels were so impressive, that I was couldn’t resist but walk up to him to shake hands with him and appreciate him for his behavior. I found out that his name is Arjun and I did not bother to know where he is from.

Some of us still carry the old and disgusting colonial mindsets of discrimination and deprivation even today, many of us are onlookers (like how I was today), and that’s even worse. But it is people like Arjun who assert their rights, break the false walls that many build and many more like us allow them to be built. But if individuals do not assert themselves and if the society doesn’t actively support people asserting their just rights, how will India as a nation assert itself?

That’s why I believe that Arjun is an everyday hero.”

Written by – Prasanna Karthik R


Courtesy : Prasanna Karthick via Facebook.