Know : List of People with or had Autism

Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired social interaction, verbal and non-verbal communication, and restricted and repetitive behavior. Parents usually notice signs in the first two years of their child’s life. These signs often develop gradually, though some children with autism reach their developmental milestones at a normal pace and then regress. The diagnostic criteria require that symptoms become apparent in early childhood, typically before age three.

However, there are people who overcame or learned to live with Autism yet remain successful and an inspiration for all. Here is a list of people with or had Autism (collected from Internet if any factual error is there let us know)

50 Tyson – rapper and autism activist
Albert Einstein – Einstein had difficulty with social interactions, was very intelligent but had difficulty learning in school.
Alexis Wineman – The first Miss America contestant with autism to compete in the Miss Montana pageant.
Alonzo Clemons – American clay sculptor
Amadeus Mozart – Famous musician.
Amanda Baggs – advocate of rights for autistic people
Bhumi Jensen – grandson of Bhumibol Adulyadej, King of Thailand
Birger Sellin – German author
Christopher Knowles – American poet
Daniel Tammet – British autistic savant
Daryl Hannah – The actress talked to People Magazine about being diagnosed with autism as a child, and how it contributed to a fear of fame as an adult.
Derek Paravicini – blind British musician
Elisabeth Hughes – Author
Evgeny Kissin – Russian pianist
Gary Numan – Singer and songwriter
Henriett Seth F. – Hungarian autistic savant, poet, writer and artist
James Durbin – American Idol frontrunner
James Hobley – British dancer and 2011 Britain’s Got Talent finalist
James Henry Pullen – gifted British carpenter
Jason McElwain – high school basketball player
Jessica-Jane Applegate – Paralympic swimmer
Jonathan Jayne – contestant on American Idol
Jonathan Lerman – American artist
Leslie Lemke – blind American musician
Luca Brecel – Belgian professional snooker player.
Lucy Blackman – university educated author
Marty Balin – singer and songwriter with Jefferson Airplane and Jefferson Starship
Matthew Laborteaux – Actor
Matt Savage – U.S. jazz prodigy
Peter Tork – Musician
Richard Wawro – Scottish artist
Stephen Wiltshire – British architectural artist
Temple Grandin – The Colorado State University calls her “the most accomplished and well-known adult with autism in the world.”
Thristan Mendoza – Filipino marimba prodigy
Tito Mukhopadhyay – author, poet, and philosopher
Todd Hodgetts – Paralympic shot putter
Tony DeBlois – blind American musician
Vincent Philip D’Onofrio – (born June 30, 1959) is an American actor, director, film producer, writer, and singer.
Caiseal Mor – author, musician, and artist
Courtney Love – frontwoman of Hole
Dylan Scott Pierce – wildlife illustrator
Hikari Oe – Japanese composer
Jim Sinclair – autism rights activist
Michelle Dawson – autism researcher and autism rights activist
Temple Grandin – food animal handling systems designer and author

Alert! : 27 Effects of Smoking on Body

This Interactive info from Healthline would be an eye opener for many. We all knew it “Smoking is injurious to health” But how?

Click on the image below or this link to go to their page where you can this interactive chart allowing the reader to pick the side effect they want to learn more about.

27 effects smoking


Courtesy & Source: Maggie Danhakl & Healthline

Know : Top 10 Largest Organs of the Human Body

Skin is the largest organ of our body. The average weight of skin in the body is about 10,886 grams which varies according to the size and weight of human beings. Human skin is made up of different ectodermic tissues and it protects all the inner body organs like liver, glands, stomach, heart etc.

liver

Liver is the second largest organ in the body males or females. Its average weight in a normal human body is 1,560 gms. The liver receives blood full of digested food from the gut. It stores some foods and delivers the rest to the other cells through blood.

Brain

Brain is the third largest and major organ of human body. Its average weight in a normal human body is 1,263 gms. The brain controls and governs the actions of all the body parts. There are about 100 billion cells in human brain enabling 100 trillion nerve connections with nerve cells for messaging.

lungs

Lungs are the fourth biggest organ. The average weight of both lungs in a normal human being is about 1,090 gms. The major function of lungs is to inhale oxygen and exhale carbon dioxide out of the red blood cells. The lungs can hold a total of up to 5 liters of air.

Male anatomy of human organs in x-ray view

Heart is the fifth largest and most important organ in humans that is essential for all living beings. The major function of the heart is to pump the blood and to ensure the provision of nutrients to every part in the body. In males the average weight of heart is 315 gms while in females this weight is about 265 gms.

Kidneys

Kidneys are the sixth largest organ in human body. There are two kidneys in every human being and the average weight of both the kidneys is about 290 grams. The major function of a kidney is to remove the waste products from the blood by regulating water fluid levels.

Spleen

Spleen is the seventh largest organ of humans. It weighs 170 grams and measures equal to the size of a human fist. It is mainly responsible for producing the red and white blood cell pulp. Spleen also contributes significantly to the immune system which acts as a strong defense against infections.

pancreas

Pancreas is the eighth largest human organ with an average weight of 98 grams in a human. It is one of the most important glands which produce several hormones including insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin. The pancreas is a dual-function gland, having features of both endocrine.

Thyroid

Thyroid is the ninth biggest human organ.The average weight of thyroid gland in human body is 35 grams. It is the largest gland in the human body. The function of this gland is to produce thyroxine and triiodothyronine hormones.

Prostate

Prostate is the tenth largest human organ with an average weight of 20 grams. Located between the penis and the bladder, Prostate gland secretes liquid which contain a fluid to protect and nourish the sperms.

Curious Question #9 : Current Shock – Why we die?

Current Shock

When you receive an electric shock, the current needs some place to enter your body and someplace to exit. The entry point is where you touch the wire or whatever you touched to cause the shock. The exit point is a place such as your foot on the ground.

The electric current then passes through your body, between those two points. It will excite the nerves, and you will tingle, or maybe even burn. In most cases an electric shock will cause your muscles to contract, and you will pull away from the wire.

You may have a problem if the electricity has to pass through a vital part of your body, such as your heart. For example, if you touch the wire with your left hand and it passes through your heart out through your right foot, you could have an issue. If the wire has sufficient power, the current would go through your heart and stop it, killing you.

Electric fences used by farmers are designed to have very little current. They tingle you, but they are designed to be “current limited”, and so they cannot kill you. The big security fences (used to keep people out) have enough power that if you touch them with your left hand and are standing on the right foot, they could kill you. Power lines (like those coming into your house) are not current limited, and will kill you if you touch them. The wires inside your home have fuses, so it is not likely that they will kill you if you touch them, but they will give you a painful burn.

LET-GO CURRENT

The maximum current that causes the flexors of the arm to contract and release the hand from the source is called a “let-go current.” The strength of the current that allows you to let go of the source depends on your weight and muscle mass. The average let-go current is 9 mA for a female and 15 mA for a male. If the extensor muscles are shocked by the current, a person may be thrown away from the current instead of being forced to hold on.


Courtesy: Duk Gaming via Answers.com

Have any curious questions? Ask us… We will find you the right answer!


 

Know : List of Foods’ Storage Periods

 

Food-storage-shelf-items

Proper food storage helps maintain food quality by retaining flavor, color, texture and nutrients, while reducing the chance of contracting a food-borne illness. Foods can be classified into three groups.

  • Perishable foods include meat, poultry, fish, milk, eggs and many raw fruits and vegetables. All cooked foods are considered perishable foods. To store these foods for any length of time, perishable foods need to be held at refrigerator or freezer temperatures. If refrigerated, perishable foods should be used within several days.
  • Semi-perishable foods, if properly stored and handled, may remain unspoiled for six months to about one year. Flour, grain products, dried fruits and dry mixes are considered semi-perishable.
  • Staple, or non-perishable, foods such as sugar, dried beans, spices and canned goods do not spoil unless they are handled carelessly. These foods will lose quality, however, if stored over a long time, even if stored under ideal conditions.

There is no exact method to determine how long a food will maintain quality and be safe to eat, because many conditions affect the quality. The storage life of foods is affected by the:

  • freshness of the food when it reached the grocery store
  • length of time and the temperature at which it was held before purchase
  • temperature of your food storage areas
  • humidity level in your food storage areas
  • type of storage container or packaging the food is stored in
  • characteristics of the food item

 

Storage Periods for Retaining Food Quality
Food Room Temperature Refrigerator Freezer at 0°F
Milk/Milk Products
Milk 1 week 1 month
Butter 2 weeks 12 months
Canned or dry milk (unopened) 6 months
Cottage cheese 1 week 3 months
Cream 1-2 weeks
Ice cream 2-3 weeks
Margarine 1 month 12 months
Natural cheese 1 month 4-6 months
Processed cheese 1 month 4-6 months
Sour cream, buttermilk, cream cheese 2 weeks Not recommended
Yogurt 1 month
Meat
Fresh roasts, steaks, chops 3-4 days 2-3 months
Fresh livers, hearts, kidneys, other variety meats 1-2 days 3-4 months
Fresh ground meat, stew meat 1-2 days 3-4 months
Cured pork and lunch meat 1 week Not recommended
Cooked meat, gravies made with meat stock 2-3 days 2-3 months
Canned meat 1 year
Meat pies, stews, casseroles, meat salads 2-3 days 3 months
Hotdogs 1 week (opened) 2 weeks (unopened) 1-2 months
Bacon 7 days 1 month
Sausage, raw from pork, beef, turkey 1-2 days 1-2 months
Hard sausage-pepperoni, jerky sticks 2-3 weeks 1-2 months
Poultry/Eggs
Fresh poultry 2 days 6-8 months
Cooked poultry 2-3 days 6 months
Poultry stuffing 1 day
Poultry pies, stews, creamed dishes, gravies 1 day 6 months
Poultry salads 1 day
Eggs 2-4 weeks 1 year
Raw yolk, whites 2-4 days 1 year
Hardcooked eggs 1 week Not recommended
Liquid pasteurized eggs or egg substitutes 10 days (unopened) 3 days (opened) 1 year (unopened)
Egg-containing products: custards, custard sauces, puddings, custard-filled pastries or cakes 1-2 days Not recommended
Puddings, canned 1-2 days (opened)
Fish/Seafood
Fresh fish 1-2 days 3-6 months
Cooked fish 3-4 days 1 month
Fish salad 1 day
Smoked fish 10 days 4-5 weeks
Canned fish 1 year Not recommended
Dried or pickled fish 3-4 weeks
Clams, oyster (shucked) and scallops 7-9 days
Crab 7 days 2 months
Shrimp 3-5 days 6-12 months
Lobster (shelled or unshelled) 3-7 days 6-12 months
Wild Game
Venison 3-5 days 3-4 months
Rabbit, squirrel 1-2 days 12 months
Wild duck, pheasant, goose(whole) 1-2 days 6 months
Fruits
Apples Until ripe 1 month
Citrus fruits 2-6 weeks
Grapes 1-3 weeks
Melons, most varieties 1 week
Peaches, nectarines 2-3 weeks
Pears (mature but not fully ripe) 1-3 months
Pineapple, ripe 1 week
Other fresh fruit Until ripe 3-5 days 9-12 months
Canned fruit 1 year 2-4 days (opened)
Dried fruit 6 months 2-4 days (cooked)
Fruit juice concentrates 1 year
Canned fruit juices 1 year 3-4 days (opened)
Vegetables
Asparagus 2-3 days
Broccoli, brussels sprouts, green peas, green onions, lima beans, rhubarb, greens, summer squash, mushrooms 3-5 days
Cabbage, cauliflower, celery, cucumbers, snap beans, lettuce, peppers, tomatoes 1 week
Carrots, beets, parsnips, radishes, turnips 2 weeks
Corn 1 day
White potatoes, sweet potatoes, winter squash, rutabagas, dry onions 1 week (several months at 50-60°F)
Canned or dried vegetables 1 year 1-4 days (opened/cooked)
Cereal Products
Flour, white 1 year
Flour, whole or wheat 6-8 months 1 year
Rice, white 2 years
Rice, brown 6 months
Ready-to-eat cereals 1 year
Uncooked cereals 1 year
Pasta 1 year
Corn meal 1 year
Bakery Goods
Breads, baked with no preservatives 2-3 weeks 2-3 months
Breads, quick, baked 2 months
Cake, angel 6-12 months
Cake, baked, frosted 1 month
Cake, baked, unfrosted 2-4 months
Cakes, batter 1 month
Cakes, fruit 6-12 months
Cinnamon rolls, partially baked 2 months
Cookies, baked, homemade 2-3 weeks 6-12 months
Cookies, dough 1-2 days 3 months
Cookies, packaged 2 months 12-18 months
Crackers 2 months
Doughnuts, unfrosted 2-4 months
Muffins, baked 6-12 months
Pies, fruit 2-3 days (baked) 1-2 days (unbaked) 6-8 months (baked) 2-4 months (unbaked)
Pies, pumpkin or chiffon 2-3 days 1-2 months
Rolls and bread, unbaked 2-3 weeks 1 month
Waffles 1 month
Mixes/Packaged Foods
Biscuit, brownie, muffin mix 9 months
Cake mixes 6-9 months
Casserole mix 9-12 months
Cookies, homemade 2-3 weeks
Cookies, packaged 2 months
Crackers 3 months
Croutons and bread crumbs 6 months 6 months 1 year
Frosting, canned 3 months
Frosting, mix 8 months
Hot roll mix 18 months
Pancake mix 6-9 months
Piecrust, mix 6-9 months
Potatoes, instant 6-12 months
Rice mixes 6 months
Sauce and gravy mixes 6-12 months
Soup mixes 12 months
Toaster pastries 2-3 months
Other Foods
Baking powder 18 months
Baking soda 2 years
Chocolate syrup 2 years (unopened) 6 months (opened)
Cocoa mixes 8 months
Coffee, lighteners (dry) 9 months (unopened) 6 months (opened)
Cornstarch 18 months
Gelatin 18 months
Pectin 1 year
Salad dressings, bottled 12 months (unopened) 1-3 months (opened) Not recommended
Sugar, brown 18 months
Sugar, confectioners’ 18 months
Sugar, granulated 2 years
Vinegar 2 years (unopened) 1 year (opened)
Cheese, parmesan, grated 10 months (unopened) 2 months (opened)
Coconut, shredded 12 months (unopened) 6 months (opened)
Imitation bacon bits, etc. 4 months
Peas, beans, dried 12 months
Popcorn 2 years
Whipped topping, dry 12 months
Yeast, dry Expiration date on package
Honey, jams, syrups, molasses 1 year
Nuts, unshelled 6 months
Nuts, shelled 6 months
Peanut butter 6 months (unopened) 2 months (opened)
Chocolate 1 year
Coffee 1 year (unopened) 2-4 weeks (opened)
Coffee, instant 6 months (unopened) 2 months (opened)
Pudding mixes 1 year
Shortening, solid 8 months
Vegetable oils 1-3 months
Tea, bags or loose 1 year
Tea, instant 1 year
Soft drinks 3 months
Bouillon products 1 year
Mayonnaise 10-12 weeks Not recommended
Spices, Herbs, Condiments, Extracts
Catsup, chili sauce 12 months (unopened) 1 month (opened)
Mustard, prepared yellow (refrigerate 2 years (unopened) for longer storage) 6-8 months (opened)
Spices, whole 1-2 years
Spices, ground 6 months
Herbs 6 months
Herb/spice blends 2 years (unopened) 12 months (opened)
Other extracts 12 months

Exclusive Cupboard Storage Chart
• Store foods in cool cabinets and away from appliances which produce heat.
• Many staples and canned foods have a relatively long shelf life, but buy only what you can expect to use within the time recommended in the chart. Date food packages and use the oldest first. Foods stored for longer than recommended times or beyond date on the package may change quality, color and flavor.
• Buy fresh-looking packages. Dusty cans or torn labels can indicate old stock. Do not purchase dented or bulging cans.

Cupboard Storage Cupboard Storage2

Courtesy & Credits : UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA–LINCOLN &  North Dakota State University

Excerpts from original articles by