Story : Would you call it Smart?

raising hands
A local Primary school was visited by the Government School Inspector who was there to check that teachers were performing well in their respective classes.

She was very impressed with one particular teacher. The Inspector noticed that each time the class teacher asked a question, every child in the class put up their hands enthusiastically to answer it. More surprisingly, whilst the teacher chose a different child to answer the questions each time, the answers were always correct.

The inspector was accompanied by the school Principal, who got struck by surprise. Because he knew that the class has average students whom he sure would not know the answers for all the questions.
But how did they answer every time? The puzzle Principal asked the teacher and got stunned by his smart thinking.

The children were instructed to ALL raise their hands whenever a question was asked. It did not matter whether they knew the answer or not.

If they did not know the answer, however, they would raise their LEFT hand.

If they knew the answer, they would raise their RIGHT hand.

The class teacher would choose a different child each time, but always the ones who had their RIGHT hand raised.

🙂
Moral: Would you call it Smart?

The Case of Kawasi Himde : Why should we educate our children about her case?

Kawasi Himde

Kawasi Himde is no celebrity or someone from a cosmopolitan city, she is a tribal woman. A few good media tried to cover her news still. Kudos to the ones who are holding the mic behind the screen to bring her story out. The rest of the NEWS media was busy in covering the IPL and Cinema gossips it seems. They may be right, audiences will show interest to watch a Salman Khan case that will help their TRP, which Kawasi cannot do.

She was acquitted after 7 years of imprisonment when a Dantewada (Chhattisgarh, India) court found her not guilty. Our judiciary system took JUST 7 years to find someone is innocent. At the age of 17, in 2008, Kawasi Himde was arrested for “being involved in the killing of 23 policemen”.

How our judiciary system is going to compensate everything she had lost? There are only loopholes but no law for this!

The real story is horrible even in our dreams. Colours of the Cage A blog covered her story exclusively in an attempt to expose the truth and to get her justice.

In January 2008 just after harvest, as in previous years, a fair was organised in Ramram, the nearby village. Kawasi accompanied her aunt and her other cousin sisters to the fair and to buy ribbons and choodis. There she joined a group of other tribals who were dancing and singing. Having danced vigorously, she soon became thirsty and approached the nearby hand-pump for water. But as soon as she held the pump, someone very forcefully grabbed her. She looked up angrily and was shocked to see Police personnel. They had surrounded her and began dragging her by her hair towards their vehicle parked outside the fair. With hands and feet tied, she was thrown on the floor of the truck and driven to the Police station. (click to continue reading) – Written by Sushmita Verma

Why should we educate our children about her case?

If you are reading this, you could be someone who works in a respectable position responsible for keeping the law, you could be an advocate, you could be a student, you could be an activist, you could be just a common civilian.. Whomsoever you are, as a human being we should have some introspection on ourselves as individuals and as a society.

What are we going behind? What are we supporting? How are we spending our time?

Thousands of cases like this are happening in our country which will not come to our attention. But at the end of the day, it is we all who make the society. Our children are going to become the lawyers, policeman, lawmakers, politicians, etc.

It is our responsibility to educate them the reality. So that they will understand everything and at least try to have some humanity and morality tomorrow. If not our generation at least coming generations may seek to live in the righteous way.

Please share this. Keep educating!


Courtesy : The Hindu,  Colours of the Cage and Satwik Mishra


Know : Top 60 Green Economy Countries

This 4th edition of the GGEI is an in-depth look at how 60 countries perform in the global green economy, as well as how expert practitioners rank this performance and ranks based on perception.

Global Green Economy Index

Performance Rank

SCORE

1 Sweden 68.1
2 Norway 65.9
3 Costa Rica 64.2
4 Germany 63.6
5 Denmark 63.2
6 Switzerland 63.1
7 Austria 63
8 Finland 62.9
9 Iceland 62.6
10 Spain 59.2
11 Ireland 59
12 New Zealand 58.8
13 France 56.4
14 Colombia 56.1
15 Portugal 55.8
16 Peru 55.8
17 Kenya 55.4
18 Brazil 55.3
19 Chile 55.1
20 United Kingdom 54.6
21 Netherlands 54.2
22 Uruguay 54.1
23 Mauritius 51.5
24 Zambia 51.3
25 Italy 51.2
26 Ethiopia 50.6
27 Rwanda 50.4
28 United States 50.1
29 Canada 49.6
30 Taiwan 47.5
31 Mexico 47.4
32 Philippines 47.2
33 Israel 47
34 South Africa 46.8
35 Malaysia 46.4
36 Tanzania 46.2
37 Australia 46.1
38 Czech Republic 46
39 South Korea 45.6
40 United Arab Emirates 45.6
41 Burkina Faso 45.2
42 Cambodia 44.9
43 Turkey 44.8
44 Japan 44.6
45 Thailand 44.5
46 Ghana 44.5
47 Belgium 44.1
48 Argentina 43.8
49 India 43.4
50 Slovakia 43
51 Panama 41.5
52 Morocco 41.5
53 Mozambique 41
54 Indonesia 40.3
55 China 40.1
56 Poland 37.1
57 Senegal 33.4
58 Qatar 33.3
59 Vietnam 32.2
60 Mongolia 29.5

India Green Rank

Climate Change Performance

The perception survey for the 2014 GGEI was conducted from June through August 2014, and polled targeted respondents on how they assessed national green performance on the four main dimensions of Leadership & Climate Change, Efficiency Sectors, Markets & Investment, and Environment & Natural Capital.

Perception Rank

SCORE

1 Germany 93.6
2 Denmark 92.8
3 Sweden 90.2
4 Norway 84.8
5 Netherlands 84
6 United States 76.2
7 Japan 72.4
8 United Kingdom 71.6
9 Finland 70.2
10 Switzerland 67.8
11 Australia 66.3
12 Canada 63
13 China 61.6
14 Costa Rica 60.4
15 Brazil 59.7
16 India 56.1
17 Austria 55.1
18 New Zealand 52
19 Iceland 49.1
20 France 48.5
21 Spain 46.7
22 South Africa 45.8
23 South Korea 44.1
24 Israel 41.1
25 United Arab Emirates 40.3
26 Kenya 40
27 Malaysia 39.3
28 Mexico 37.1
29 Italy 36.1
30 Belgium 36
31 Indonesia 35.3
32 Peru 35
33 Ireland 34.3
34 Mauritius 34
35 Chile 33.5
36 Tanzania 33.3
37 Ethiopia 33.1
38 Philippines 33
39 Morocco 32.6
40 Portugal 32.5
41 Colombia 31.6
42 Poland 31.5
43 Qatar 31.2
44 Turkey 31.2
45 Vietnam 31.1
46 Taiwan 30.7
47 Argentina 30.2
48 Rwanda 30.1
49 Zambia 30
50 Mozambique 29.8
51 Thailand 29.3
52 Czech Republic 29.2
53 Cambodia 28.9
54 Ghana 28.7
55 Burkina Faso 28.5
56 Slovakia 28.2
57 Mongolia 27.7
58 Uruguay 27.6
59 Panama 27.4
60 Senegal 27.3

Germany (perception) and Sweden (performance) top the 2014 GGEI, confirming a trend observed in prior editions of strong results by Germany and the Nordic states. Besides performing well on both the economic and environmental areas of the GGEI, these nations display consistent green leadership and receive global recognition for it.

Covered for the first time in this edition, Costa Rica performs extremely well, ranking third on the GGEI performance measure behind Sweden and Norway and receiving strong recognition on the perception survey, an impressive result for such a small country.

Like in 2012, Copenhagen is the top green city as ranked by our survey of global experts, reinforcing the continued strength of the Danish green brand. Tracked for the first time this year, Vancouver and Singapore also rank in the top 10 of green cities.

Many of the fastest growing economies in the world rank poorly on the GGEI performance measure, highlighting an urgent need to reorient their economies to greener

growth pathways. Regionally, these countries are mostly in Africa (Ghana), the Gulf (Qatar, United Arab Emirates), and Asia (Cambodia, China, Thailand, Vietnam)

There are concerning results related to more developed countries as well – notably Australia, Japan, the Netherlands and the United States – where perceptions of their green economic performance dramatically exceed their actual performance on the GGEI. These countries appear to receive more credit than they deserve, an information gap that requires further exploration.

Despite its leadership founding the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI), South Korea continues not to register as a green country brand on our survey and performs poorly, ranked 39th out of 60 on this year’s GGEI. Despite better perception results, Japan also performs poorly on the 2014 GGEI, ranked 44th out of 60.

While the United Kingdom performs adequately in most areas of the GGEI, it doesn’t excel on any one topic, possibly due to inconsistent political rhetoric and policy related to green economy there. While gradually improving in each successive GGEI edition, the UK still lags behind its northern European and Nordic competitors.

Five European nations – Austria, Iceland, Ireland, Portugal and Spain – reveal performance scores that exceed their perception ones significantly – signaling an urgent need for better strategic communications and information exchange of their green merits and associated investment opportunities.

The GGEI results reveal a similar observation for a variety of non-European states – including Ethiopia, Mauritius, Rwanda in Africa and Colombia, Chile and Peru in Latin America – again suggesting a need for these states to better position their green economies on the international stage.


Courtesy and Source : GGEI-Report 2014 by DUAL CITIZEN LLC

Disclaimer: All the rights of the data and the study belong to DUAL CITIZEN LLC. We have shared the info here for educational purposes only. We do not own any info above or the rights.


The Making #2 : Baloons

Balloons are manufactured from a liquid rubber called latex. The balloon gets its color from the pigment that is added to the latex. Pigments are both organic and inorganic compounds that absorb certain wavelengths of visible light and reflect others. For example, a red balloon is red because the balloon absorbs all the visible light except red frequency light which is reflected back to the eye.

Latex harvesting does not hurt the tree! Latex balloons are earth-friendly! Rubber trees grow in rain forests. Latex harvesting discourages deforestation because latex-producing trees are left intact. A tree can produce latex for up to 40 years!

The strength of balloons can be affected by the pigment if the pigment particle is large in size and interferes with the film continuity and if the pigment reacts with any of the other ingredients in the balloon. As far as which color has the most effect on the balloons strength, we have not done any in depth study. Since we use pigments that are water dispersions of very, very, small particle size, and they do not react with any other ingredients in the latex, we do not detect any difference.

The natural rubber latex that we use comes from the sap of the rubber tree , Heveabrasiliensis, that grows in Malaysia. This sap looks like milk and is shipped to America in large ocean tanker ships. Once removed from the tree, the sap is called latex. To make this suitable for balloon production, curing agents, accelerators, oil, color, and water must be added. After these are added, the completed latex is put in an open top tank, and the balloon form, which is in the shape of a balloon, isdipped. Before the form is dipped into latex, it is dipped into a coagulent that causes the rubber particles of the latex to collect on the form. This coagulent is calcium nitrate, water, and/or alcohol. After the coagulent coated form is dried, it is then dipped into the compounded latex. Then the latex coated form passed through a set of revolving brushes that rolls the balloon neck into the bead that is used to aid in the inflation of the balloon. The latex coated form is then washed in hot water to remove any unused nitrate. Following the leaching, the form is put in a 200-220 degrees Fahrenheit oven to cure for 20-25 minutes. When cured, the rubber balloon is removed from the form (Read More)


Source and Courtesy : Youtube (How It’s Made) and www.balloonhq.com

Know : How Maglev Trains Work without Wheels?

Magnets always fascinate us and a favourite topic for many physics lovers. Magnets just not have the property to attract metals but also attracted the interests of modern day scientists. The principle of magnetism is been applied many utilities in our daily life.

Ever since the issue of global warming and fossil fuels popped up, the world is looking for an alternate energy. Transportation is one of the major factors when it comes to greenhouse gases.

How about using magnets for transportation? A transport without any fuel? without any emission? Is that possible?

Maglev Transportation is the first step towards a great future. Let us learn more about it.

What is Maglev?

Maglev (derived from magnetic levitation) is a transport method that uses magnetic levitation to move vehicles without touching the ground. With maglev, a vehicle travels along a guideway using magnets to create both lift and propulsion, thereby reducing friction and allowing higher speeds.

Maglev

When you were a kid, you might have tried to balance one magnet in the air using other magnets. The same basic principle is applied using electromagnetic (maglev) tracks.

The Differences

The big difference between a maglev train and a conventional train is that maglev trains do not have an engine — at least not the kind of engine used to pull typical train cars along steel tracks. The engine for maglev trains is rather inconspicuous. Instead of using fossil fuels, the magnetic field created by the electrified coils in the guideway walls and the track combine to propel the train.

maglev-track mag-lev-diagram

How Maglev Train works

Comparison with conventional trains

Maglev transport is non-contact and electric powered. It relies less or not at all on the wheels, bearings and axles common to wheeled rail systems.

  • Speed: Maglev allows higher top speeds than conventional rail, but experimental wheel-based high-speed trains have demonstrated similar speeds.
  • Maintenance: Maglev trains currently in operation have demonstrated the need for minimal guideway maintenance. Vehicle maintenance is also minimal (based on hours of operation, rather than on speed or distance traveled). Traditional rail is subject to mechanical wear and tear that increases exponentially with speed, also increasing maintenance.
  • Weather: Maglev trains are little affected by snow, ice, severe cold, rain or high winds. However, they have not operated in the wide range of conditions that traditional friction-based rail systems have operated.[citation needed] Maglev vehicles accelerate and decelerate faster than mechanical systems regardless of the slickness of the guideway or the slope of the grade because they are non-contact systems.
  • Track: Maglev trains are not compatible with conventional track, and therefore require custom infrastructure for their entire route. By contrast conventional high-speed trains such as the TGV are able to run, albeit at reduced speeds, on existing rail infrastructure, thus reducing expenditure where new infrastructure would be particularly expensive (such as the final approaches to city terminals), or on extensions where traffic does not justify new infrastructure.
  • Weight: The electromagnets in many EMS and EDS designs require between 1 and 2 kilowatts per ton. The use of superconductor magnets can reduce the electromagnets’ energy consumption. A 50-ton Transrapid maglev vehicle can lift an additional 20 tons, for a total of 70 tons, which consumes 70-140 kW.[citation needed] Most energy use for the TRI is for propulsion and overcoming air resistance at speeds over 100 mph.[citation needed]
  • Weight loading: High speed rail requires more support and construction for its concentrated wheel loading. Maglev cars are lighter and distribute weight more evenly.
  • Noise: Because the major source of noise of a maglev train comes from displaced air rather than from wheels touching rails, maglev trains produce less noise than a conventional train at equivalent speeds. However, the psychoacoustic profile of the maglev may reduce this benefit: a study concluded that maglev noise should be rated like road traffic, while conventional trains experience a 5–10 dB “bonus”, as they are found less annoying at the same loudness level.
  • Braking: Braking and overhead wire wear have caused problems for the Fastech 360 rail Shinkansen. Maglev would eliminate these issues.
  • Magnet reliability: At higher temperatures magnets may fail. New alloys and manufacturing techniques have addressed this issue.
  • Control systems: No signalling systems are needed for high-speed rail, because such systems are computer controlled. Human operators cannot react fast enough to manage high-speed trains. High speed systems require dedicated rights of way and are usually elevated. Two maglev system microwave towers are in constant contact with trains. There is no need for train whistles or horns, either.
  • Terrain: Maglevs are able to ascend higher grades, offering more routing flexibility and reduced tunneling.

Comparison with aircraft

Differences between airplane and maglev travel:

  • Efficiency: For maglev systems the lift-to-drag ratio can exceed that of aircraft (for example Inductrack can approach 200:1 at high speed, far higher than any aircraft). This can make maglev more efficient per kilometer. However, at high cruising speeds, aerodynamic drag is much larger than lift-induced drag. Jets take advantage of low air density at high altitudes to significantly reduce air drag. Hence despite their lift-to-drag ratio disadvantage, they can travel more efficiently at high speeds than maglev trains that operate at sea level.
  • Routing: While aircraft can theoretically take any route between points, commercial air routes are rigidly defined. Maglevs offer competitive journey times over distances of 800 kilometres (500 miles) or less. Additionally, maglevs can easily serve intermediate destinations.
  • Availability: Maglevs are little affected by weather.
  • Safety: Maglevs offer a significant safety margin since maglevs do not crash into other maglevs or leave their guideways.
  • Travel time: Maglevs do not face the extended security protocols faced by air travelers nor is time consumed for taxiing, or for queuing for take-off and landing.

Despite decades of research and development, only two commercial maglev transport systems are in operation, with two others under construction. The highest recorded maglev speed is 603 km/h (375 mph), achieved in Japan by JR Central’s L0 superconducting Maglev on 2015 April,21. The Japanese trains use super-cooled, superconducting electromagnets. This kind of electromagnet can conduct electricity even after the power supply has been shut off.


Courtesy: Wikipedia, Google and Youtube