Know : 22 Reasons : Why We Need Trees?

Trees combat the climate change

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Excess carbon dioxide (CO2) caused by many factors is a building up in our atmosphere and contributing to climate change. Trees absorb CO2, removing and storing the carbon while releasing the oxygen back into the air. In one year, an acre of mature trees absorbs the amount of CO2 produced when you drive your car 26,000 miles.

Trees clean the air

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Trees absorb odors and pollutant gases (nitrogen oxides, ammonia, sulfur dioxide and ozone) and filter particulates out of the air by trapping them on their leaves and bark.

Trees provide oxygen

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In one year an acre of mature trees can provide enough oxygen for 18 people.

Trees cool the streets and the city

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Average temperatures in Los Angeles have risen 6°F in the last 50 years as tree coverage has declined and the number of heat-absorbing roads and buildings has increased.
Trees cool the city by up to 10°F, by shading our homes and streets, breaking up urban “heat islands” and releasing water vapor into the air through their leaves.

Trees conserve energy

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Three trees placed strategically around a single-family home can cut summer air conditioning needs by up to 50 percent. By reducing the energy demand for cooling our houses, we reduce carbon dioxide and other pollution emissions from power plants.

Trees save water

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Shade from trees slows water evaporation from thirsty lawns. Most newly planted trees need only fifteen gallons of water a week. As trees transpire, they increase atmospheric moisture.

Trees help prevent water pollution

Trees cleans water

Trees reduce runoff by breaking rainfall thus allowing the water to flow down the trunk and into the earth below the tree. This prevents stormwater from carrying pollutants to the ocean. When mulched, trees act like a sponge that filters this water naturally and uses it to recharge groundwater supplies.

Trees help prevent soil erosion

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On hillsides or stream slopes, trees slow runoff and hold soil in place.

Trees shield children from ultra-violet rays

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. Trees reduce UV-B exposure by about 50 percent, thus providing protection to children on school campuses and playgrounds – where children spend hours outdoors.

Trees provide food

Governor's plum

Governor’s plum

An apple tree can yield up to 15-20 bushels of fruit per year and can be planted on the tiniest urban lot. Aside from fruit for humans, trees provide food for birds and wildlife.

Trees heal

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Studies have shown that patients with views of trees out their windows heal faster and with less complications. Children with ADHD show fewer symptoms when they have access to nature. Exposure to trees and nature aids concentration by reducing mental fatigue.

Trees reduce violence

Tree reduces violence

Neighborhoods and homes that are barren have shown to have a greater incidence of violence in and out of the home than their greener counterparts. Trees and landscaping help to reduce the level of fear.

Trees mark the seasons

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Is it winter, spring, summer or fall? Look at the trees.

Trees create economic opportunities

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Fruit harvested from community orchards can be sold, thus providing income. Small business opportunities in green waste management and landscaping arise when cities value mulching and its water-saving qualities. Vocational training for youth interested in green jobs is also a great way to develop economic opportunities from trees.

Trees are teachers and playmates

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Whether as houses for children or creative and spiritual inspiration for adults, trees have provided the space for human retreat throughout the ages.

Trees bring diverse groups of people together

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Tree plantings provide an opportunity for community involvement and empowerment that improves the quality of life in our neighborhoods. All cultures, ages, and genders have an important role to play at a tree planting or tree care event.

Trees add unity

People sitting under a tree in Placa de Santa Maria, Puigcerda, Sunday morning, August 2011

Trees as landmarks can give a neighborhood a new identity and encourage civic pride.

Trees provide a canopy and habitat for wildlife

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Sycamore and oak are among the many urban species that provide excellent urban homes for birds, bees, possums and squirrels.

Trees block things

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Trees can mask concrete walls or parking lots, and unsightly views. They muffle sound from nearby streets and freeways, and create an eye-soothing canopy of green. Trees absorb dust and wind and reduce glare.

Trees provide wood

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In suburban and rural areas, trees can be selectively harvested for fuel and craft wood.

Trees increase property values

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The beauty of a well-planted property and its surrounding street and neighborhood can raise property values by as much as 15 percent.

Trees increase business traffic

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Studies show that the more trees and landscaping a business district has, the more business will flow in. A tree-lined street will also slow traffic – enough to allow the drivers to look at the store fronts instead of whizzing by.


Courtesy: The Tree People


Eco-preservation : Chinese Air Pollution affects Japan and Korea

Buildings in the western Japanese city of Osaka, some 2,250 kilometers (1,400 miles) southeast of Beijing, are shrouded in dense smog Wednesday, February 26, 2014 a day after parts of northern China suffered a sixth straight day of severe pollution. The readings of particulate matter known as PM2.5, a key measure of pollution reached 104 micrograms per cubic meter in Osaka in the morning. The World Health Organization considers 25 micrograms a safe level. (Photo by AP Photo/Kyodo News) 

Buildings in the western Japanese city of Osaka, some 2,250 kilometers (1,400 miles) southeast of Beijing, are shrouded in dense smog Wednesday, February 26, 2014 a day after parts of northern China suffered a sixth straight day of severe pollution. The readings of particulate matter known as PM2.5, a key measure of pollution reached 104 micrograms per cubic meter in Osaka in the morning. The World Health Organization considers 25 micrograms a safe level. (Photo by AP Photo/Kyodo News)

A general view of the pollution covered Beijing CBD on February 25, 2014 in Beijing, China. The air pollution has caused an increase in the number of people seeking hospital treatment for respiratory problems and the public are asked to avoid outdoor activities. (Photo by Lintao Zhang/Getty Images)

A general view of the pollution covered Beijing CBD on February 25, 2014 in Beijing, China. The air pollution has caused an increase in the number of people seeking hospital treatment for respiratory problems and the public are asked to avoid outdoor activities. (Photo by Lintao Zhang/Getty Images)

A couple watches the Seoul skyline covered with a thick haze at Seoul Tower's observation deck in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, February 26, 2014. The Seoul metropolitan government issued a dust warning, urging people to stay indoors. (Photo by Ahn Young-joon/AP Photo) 
A couple watches the Seoul skyline covered with a thick haze at Seoul Tower’s observation deck in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, February 26, 2014. The Seoul metropolitan government issued a dust warning, urging people to stay indoors.
(Photo by Ahn Young-joon/AP Photo)

Children walk back home after school on a severely polluted day in Shijiazhuang, in northern China's Hebei province, Wednesday, February 26, 2014. (Photo by Alexander F. Yuan/AP Photo) 
Children walk back home after school on a severely polluted day in Shijiazhuang, in northern China’s Hebei province,
Wednesday, February 26, 2014.
(Photo by Alexander F. Yuan/AP Photo)

Vehicles clog a main highway during a sixth straight day of severe pollution in Beijing Tuesday, February 25, 2014. Hazardous white pollution hid much of Beijing's skyline Tuesday, despite announced closures or production cuts at 147 of the city's industrial plants. Chinese characters on board reads: “Smog weather, reduce going outside”. (Photo by Ng Han Guan/AP Photo) 
Vehicles clog a main highway during a sixth straight day of severe pollution in Beijing Tuesday, February 25, 2014. Hazardous white pollution hid much of Beijing’s skyline Tuesday, despite announced closures or production cuts at 147 of the city’s industrial plants. Chinese characters on board reads: “Smog weather, reduce going outside”.
(Photo by Ng Han Guan/AP Photo)

A watchdog stands in front of a wall with a mosaic scenic painting at a cement plant on a severely polluted day in Shijiazhuang, in northern China's Hebei province, Wednesday, February 26, 2014. The meteorological center said moderate or severe pollution had persisted in northern China since Thursday, and that it was particularly serious in Beijing and its surrounding area. It forecast that the pollution would continue in parts of eastern, northern and central China until Wednesday evening, when precipitation and wind should help to disperse it. (Photo by Alexander F. Yuan/AP Photo) 
A watchdog stands in front of a wall with a mosaic scenic painting at a cement plant on a severely polluted day in Shijiazhuang, in northern China’s Hebei province, Wednesday, February 26, 2014. The meteorological center said moderate or severe pollution had persisted in northern China since Thursday, and that it was particularly serious in Beijing and its surrounding area. It forecast that the pollution would continue in parts of eastern, northern and central China until Wednesday evening, when precipitation and wind should help to disperse it.
(Photo by Alexander F. Yuan/AP Photo)

People are seen inside a residential apartment building as city skyline shrouded with heavy haze in Beijing Wednesday, February 26, 2014. Beijing remained cloaked in hazardous white pollution hiding much of its skyline Wednesday, despite the announced closures or production cuts at 147 of the city's industrial plants. (Photo by Andy Wong/AP Photo) 
People are seen inside a residential apartment building as city skyline shrouded with heavy haze in Beijing Wednesday, February 26, 2014. Beijing remained cloaked in hazardous white pollution hiding much of its skyline Wednesday, despite the announced closures or production cuts at 147 of the city’s industrial plants.
(Photo by Andy Wong/AP Photo)

A man and a car travelling on a road are obscured in heavy haze on a severely polluted day in Pingshan county of Shijiazhuang, in northern China's Hebei province, Wednesday, February 26, 2014. Chinese President Xi Jinping braved Beijing's choking smog Tuesday, making an unannounced visit to a trendy alley and sitting with residents in his latest public relations effort to be seen as a man of the people. (Photo by Alexander F. Yuan/AP Photo) 
A man and a car travelling on a road are obscured in heavy haze on a severely polluted day in Pingshan county of Shijiazhuang, in northern China’s Hebei province, Wednesday, February 26, 2014. Chinese President Xi Jinping braved Beijing’s choking smog Tuesday, making an unannounced visit to a trendy alley and sitting with residents in his latest public relations effort to be seen as a man of the people.
(Photo by Alexander F. Yuan/AP Photo)

Vehicles clog a highway during a hazy day in Beijing, China, Wednesday, February 26, 2014. Beijing remained cloaked in hazardous white pollution hiding much of its skyline Wednesday, despite the announced closures or production cuts at 147 of the city's industrial plants. (Photo by Ng Han Guan/AP Photo) 
Vehicles clog a highway during a hazy day in Beijing, China, Wednesday, February 26, 2014. Beijing remained cloaked in hazardous white pollution hiding much of its skyline Wednesday, despite the announced closures or production cuts at 147 of the city’s industrial plants.
(Photo by Ng Han Guan/AP Photo)

Paramilitary policemen stand ready to march across Tiananmen Square on a severely polluted day in Beijing, China, Tuesday, February 25, 2014. Pollution across a large swath of northern China worsened on Tuesday. (Photo by Alexander F. Yuan/AP Photo) 
Paramilitary policemen stand ready to march across Tiananmen Square on a severely polluted day in Beijing, China, Tuesday, February 25, 2014. Pollution across a large swath of northern China worsened on Tuesday.
(Photo by Alexander F. Yuan/AP Photo)

Pedestrians cross an overhead bridge as vehicles clog a main highway during a sixth straight day of severe pollution in Beijing Tuesday, February 25, 2014. Hazardous white pollution hid much of Beijing's skyline Tuesday, despite announced closures or production cuts at 147 of the city's industrial plants. (Photo by Ng Han Guan/AP Photo) 
Pedestrians cross an overhead bridge as vehicles clog a main highway during a sixth straight day of severe pollution in Beijing Tuesday, February 25, 2014. Hazardous white pollution hid much of Beijing’s skyline Tuesday, despite announced closures or production cuts at 147 of the city’s industrial plants.
(Photo by Ng Han Guan/AP Photo)

In this photo taken Sunday February 23, 2014, residents barbecue along the river bank during a hazy day in southwest China's Chongqing municipality. Xinhua said that almost all provinces in central and east China have had serious air pollution since Friday, and that Beijing and five provinces in northern and eastern China had reported “severe smog”. (Photo by AP Photo) 
In this photo taken Sunday February 23, 2014, residents barbecue along the river bank during a hazy day in southwest China’s Chongqing municipality. Xinhua said that almost all provinces in central and east China have had serious air pollution since Friday, and that Beijing and five provinces in northern and eastern China had reported “severe smog”.
(Photo by AP Photo)

Chinese women wearing masks cross the road near the headquarters of the China Central Television headquarters during a hazy day in Beijing, China, Wednesday, February 26, 2014. (Photo by Ng Han Guan/AP Photo) 
Chinese women wearing masks cross the road near the headquarters of the China Central Television headquarters during a hazy day in Beijing, China, Wednesday, February 26, 2014.
(Photo by Ng Han Guan/AP Photo)

A combination picture shows Beijing's hazy sky (L) on February 24, 2014 and clear sky on February 27, 2014, from the top of Jingshan Park near the Forbidden City. China's environment ministry has vowed to “harshly punish” factories and power plants that contributed to a hazardous smog which enveloped much of Northern China, official state media reported on Wednesday. (Photo by Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters) 
A combination picture shows Beijing’s hazy sky (L) on February 24, 2014 and clear sky on February 27, 2014, from the top of Jingshan Park near the Forbidden City. China’s environment ministry has vowed to “harshly punish” factories and power plants that contributed to a hazardous smog which enveloped much of Northern China, official state media reported on Wednesday.
(Photo by Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters)

Tourists visit Jingshan Hill before the Forbidden City as heavy air pollution continues to shroud Beijing on February 26, 2014. Beijing's official reading for PM 2.5, small airborne particles which easily penetrate the lungs and have been linked to hundreds of thousands of premature deaths, stood at 501 micrograms per cubic metre. (Photo by Mark Ralston/AFP Photo) 

Tourists visit Jingshan Hill before the Forbidden City as heavy air pollution continues to shroud Beijing on February 26, 2014. Beijing’s official reading for PM 2.5, small airborne particles which easily penetrate the lungs and have been linked to hundreds of thousands of premature deaths, stood at 501 micrograms per cubic metre(Photo by Mark Ralston/AFP Photo)

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Eco-preservation : Alas! This many Environmental Issues Exist?

How many Environmental Issues are you aware of? This list will definitely exceed your known  list of issues. Just click the issue to know what it is all about. (Permalinks to wiki)

Courtesy and Source : Wikipedia

Alert! : Chemtrails : Have you seen them in the skies near your home?

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Have you noticed more planes flying overhead in your community that leave trails behind them in the sky? Apparently these patterns are the result of “weather modification” programs — also referred to as “solar radiation management” or “Chemtrails”. The international program involves spraying aluminum, barium, strontium and other toxic chemicals from airplanes at high altitudes that then fall to the ground, ending up in our bodies, our water, our soil and the air we breathe.

6 Pics for the 6th Sense : Air Pollution

Pollution: by Adan Iglesias Toledo

Animals Feel Pollution: by Adan Iglesias Toledo

Pollution: by Alfredo Martirena

Play with Pollution: by Alfredo Martirena

Pollution: by Sofia Mamalinga

Funding Pollution: by Sofia Mamalinga

Pollution: by Seteve Greenberg

Happy Earth Day: by Seteve Greenberg

Pollution: by Spiros Derveniotis

Global Pollution: by Spiros Derveniotis

Pollution: by Arcadio Esquivel

Christmas is nearby: by Arcadio Esquivel

Courtesy : Cartoon MovementAlfredo MartirenaArcadio EsquivelAdán Iglesias ToledoSpiros Derveniotis,  Sofia Mamalinga