Random Beautiful Humans : Pradeep Kumar

Humans of Kochi“A few weeks ago, he was hacked down by some people.”
“Oh why did they do that?”
“This is how people show their anger towards me to cause me pain. Apart being an animal welfare officer, I’m also a slaughterhouse inspector. Hence many don’t like what I do.”

“How did you start rescuing animals?”
“Even during the time of my school days, I used to rescue dogs who got hurt due to road accidents. I used to take care of them and find homes for them.”

“Could you share a rescue-story that has deeply impacted you?”
“Once I got a call to kill a dog. The caller said that the dog is in critical condition and it would be best to end its life rather than making it suffer the pain. I was on my way to Kochi from Thrissur that time, so I told him to wait and not to do anything with the dog. I was in touch with him throughout my drive to ensure that the dog was not killed before I reach there. Finally what I found was a piece of meat lying on the road, whimpering with pain. Someone had poured acid on it and the whole body was in a molten fused state. It had been lying there in that situation for almost two days. People around me were forcing me to kill it. I asked them would you do the same if this happened to any of you. And their reply was – who wants them anyway, it’s high time these dogs are all killed off.

I didn’t bother replying to them because I knew they didn’t deserve any reply. I carried the dog to my car. All the blood, flesh and pus were sticking to my shirt. I took him to Cochin Pet Hospital. The doctor was shocked to see him. He asked me what to do as he felt that there was no way the dog could be saved. I told him, you have to somehow do something or the other.

“What was the doctor’s name?”
“Dr. Sooraj. It took us four and a half hours to save him. We had to remove large amount of dirt which were sticking inside his flesh as people had thrown sand and stones at him. We had to clean all of that.”

“People had thrown sand and stones at him, even when he was lying there burnt in acid?”
“Yes, that’s how cruel the society is. We don’t have even an ounce of a feeling called compassion in our minds!“

“Oh, so how did he then recover?”
“Ricky was not able to sleep even after giving sedation. For acid attacks, the pain will not go even if you give sedatives. For five and a half months, he was not able to sit. He had to stand throughout the period. So we built an adjustable support to help him stand. With medication and proper care, Ricky became a healthy dog.”

“What is the scenario of pet dogs being abandoned in Kochi?”
“We get around 15-20 calls in a day regarding pet dogs found on the streets. 60 percent of the cases are due to people abandoning them due to old-age. Remaining 40 percent is because they don’t want to take care of their dogs when they get sick.”

“Could you elaborate on this?”

“Breeders are abandoning dogs on the streets after they become old and unusable to give birth. There are many people who keep dogs just to show off to their guests. It is a matter of pride for them to make others see that they own German Shepherd, Doberman and other expensive breeds of dogs. First of all, our climate is not suitable for dogs such as Pug, St. Bernard, German Shepherd. These dogs are later thrown into the streets when they grow old. People abandon their pet dogs when they get skin disease, when they get an eye infection, when they get pus in their ears or when the owners change their residence. I have got calls from many saying they have seen a pet dog roaming around nearby their area and if it would be possible for me to take it away. In many cases, these callers are actually the owners of the dogs pretending to be not connected with the dog and they want to somehow get rid of them through me.”

“Oh!”

“Being educated and being cultured are two different things. We are very high in being educated, but very low in being cultured. We have to develop a culture with a sense of responsibility to our society, with a sense of responsibility to the people living in that society, and with a sense of responsibility to the other living beings existing along with those people. Currently we do not have any of these, it’s all destroyed. Now if we want to revive these, they can only be developed through today’s children.”

“So what message do you wish to convey to the society?”

“God has given us abilities – not to plunder the earth and loot people. We all have the ability to love, but we are not willing to use that. We don’t want to see even when we have eyes; we don’t want to hear even when we have ears. A change is needed for all this.

PS: The interviewee, Mr. Pradeep Kumar, founder of KARMMA (Karuna Animal Rescue Ministering and Management Association), passed away last week suffering from a heart attack. We pray that his loved and dear ones get the strength to move on.

Team Propel Steps also share our tribute to such a wonderful human being.


Photo credit: Deepesh PM

This Post was originally written and posted by Humans Of Kochi

Courtesy & Source / Via- Humans Of Kochi

Picture Speaks : Factory Farming

Voiceless is an independent, non-profit think tank focused on raising awareness of animals suffering in factory farming and the kangaroo industry in Australia. Their vision is for a world in which animals are treated with respect and compassion.

Please support them. Here is their website: Voiceless

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SAVE : Thousands of Buffaloes Killed Brutally!!!

Nepal

This is a ritual that is happening in Nepal. Day one they have slaughtered 5000 Buffaloes, which worshippers believe will bring good luck. and the numbers may increase in day two and the last day – according to Times of India.

Gadhimai festival is a month-long Hindu festival that is held every 5 years at the Gadhimai temple of Bariyarpur, inBara District, about 100 miles (160 km) south of the capital Kathmandu in southern Nepal, near the Indo-Nepal border.The event involves the world’s second largest sacrificial slaughter of animals after Hajj (but third largest in terms of number of animals consumed after Thanksgiving and Eid al-Fitr) including water buffaloes, pigs, goats, chicken, rats, and pigeons – with the goal of pleasing Gadhimai, the goddess of power.

The festival has prompted numerous protests by animal rights activists and Nepalese Hindus from Hill region. In 2009 activists made several attempts to stop the ritual, including Brigitte Bardot and Maneka Gandhi, who wrote to the Nepalese government asking them to stop the killings. A government official commented that they would not “interfere in the centuries-old tradition of the Madheshi people.” Ram Bahadur Bomjon, claimed by some of his supporters to be the reincarnation of the Buddha, said that he would attempt to stop the sacrifice at the festival, preaching non-violence and offering a blessing at the place.His promise prompted the government to send additional forces to prevent any incident.

After the festival, the meat, bones and hides of the animals are sold to companies in India and Nepal.

Because the men who take on the role of killing the animals are largely unskilled in the ways of humane slaughter there is a concern that the animals are suffering needlessly, and dying slow and painful deaths.

The Indian Ministry of Home Affairs has directed the states of Bihar and Uttar Pradesh to monitor and make sure no animals get to Nepal for the festival.

Actress Joanna Lumley of United Kingdom urged to stop the mass killings of animals in Gadhimai festival urging Madheshi leader and bordering Indians to stop this savagery.

– Wikipedia

I am deeply hurt to know such barbaric practise exists among humans. Wonder is there any Blue cross or Animal Rights group exists in Nepal! Why no one is caring for the animals?

We request you to share this across, especially with people who can stop such idiotic traditions and save those animals. Please do something.

A Thought can Change #3

Why we kill Mosquitoes? Obviously, they spread diseases, deadly diseases! Of course, they are designed to survive like that by nature. Just like a lion hunting a deer, a fungus grows on a host; mosquitos need blood mostly to survive. Here comes the logic that we hate everything that is potentially a threat to our safe existence. We love butterflies with colourful wings, what if they were supposedly can survive only by sucking our blood? Then we would hate them as we do mosquitoes, which also has wings, though not colourful as a butterfly.

In Mosquitoes case, we lack immunity and that’s our weakness. That little insect thus becomes a hulk-like threat to our survival. So we are overcoming our immune disability by killing them. We hate them for our lack of immunity. 🙂 May sound ironic and I am not an extreme-naturist.

Same in the case of pathogens like viruses, bacteria, etc. Thus, this proves we are supposed to hate and eliminate any such species which is a threat to us. Right?

Then look at the mirror side, we humans are a threat to the livelihood of millions of other species on the earth. Especially to the ones which never cause a harm to humans and even to those species which helps us a lot to survive. Don’t they deserve a chance to hate us and eliminate us? Because according to our own logic, we are a threat to their existence.

Here comes our superiority hold, survival of the fittest. Just think once! Just because we hold supremacy, is it wise to exploit the rest of all other species on the earth? It’s Time to Change!

– Words by Din

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Exotic Food Humans Eat : Have you tried any of these? !!!

CONTENT ADVISE : YOU MAY FEEL DISGUSTING TO FEW OF THE IMAGES, YET THEY ARE EATING HABITS OF OUR FELLOW HUMANS. SO LET US JUST SEE WHAT THEY HAVE FOR THEIR LUNCH.
A woman prepares a dish of camel liver at her shop in Tamboal village market in Al Jazeera April 16, 2011. According to the Sudanese Ministry of Animals Resources in 2003, the country produced about 72,000 to 81,000 tonnes of camel meat annually from 1996 to 2002. (Photo by Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Reuters) 

A woman prepares a dish of camel liver at her shop in Tamboal village market in Al Jazeera April 16, 2011. According to the Sudanese Ministry of Animals Resources in 2003, the country produced about 72,000 to 81,000 tonnes of camel meat annually from 1996 to 2002. (Photo by Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Reuters)

___________

Slaughtered rats are displayed for sale at the market of Canh Nau village, 40 km (25 miles) west of Hanoi December 25, 2011. Canh Nau is known as rat meat village where people eat rats as well as other kinds of meat from animals such as pigs, cows and chickens. One kilogram of slaughtered rats costs 80,000 dong ($3.80). Rats were eaten as a result of poverty in the past but now they are eaten at the end of every month of the lunar calendar as a special dish and local media reported that an average of a hundred kilograms of rat are sold at the village per day. (Photo by Reuters/Kham) 

Slaughtered rats are displayed for sale at the market of Canh Nau village, 40 km (25 miles) west of Hanoi December 25, 2011. Canh Nau is known as rat meat village where people eat rats as well as other kinds of meat from animals such as pigs, cows and chickens. One kilogram of slaughtered rats costs 80,000 dong ($3.80). Rats were eaten as a result of poverty in the past but now they are eaten at the end of every month of the lunar calendar as a special dish and local media reported that an average of a hundred kilograms of rat are sold at the village per day. (Photo by Reuters/Kham)

Lemurs illegally killed by poachers in Madagascar to be sold to restaurants as “luxury” bushmeat are seen in this undated handout photograph. Endangered lemur species found only in Madagascar are being slaughtered and served up in local restaurants as poachers take advantage of a security vacuum on the island after a coup earlier this year. (Photo by Joel Narivony/Reuters/Fanamby) 

Lemurs illegally killed by poachers in Madagascar to be sold to restaurants as “luxury” bushmeat are seen in this undated handout photograph. Endangered lemur species found only in Madagascar are being slaughtered and served up in local restaurants as poachers take advantage of a security vacuum on the island after a coup earlier this year. (Photo by Joel Narivony/Reuters/Fanamby)

A vendor (C) cuts slaughtered dogs for sale at his roadside stall in Duong Noi village, outside Hanoi December 16, 2011. While animal rights activists have condemned eating dog meat as cruel treatment of the animals, it is still an accepted popular delicacy for some Vietnamese, as well in some other Asian countries. Duong Noi is well-known as a dog-meat village, where hundreds of dogs are killed each day for sale as popular traditional food. Dog-eating as a custom is rooted in Vietnam and was developed as a result of poverty. One kilogram of dog meat costs about 130,000 dongs ($6.2). (Photo by Reuters/Kham) 

A vendor (C) cuts slaughtered dogs for sale at his roadside stall in Duong Noi village, outside Hanoi December 16, 2011. While animal rights activists have condemned eating dog meat as cruel treatment of the animals, it is still an accepted popular delicacy for some Vietnamese, as well in some other Asian countries. Duong Noi is well-known as a dog-meat village, where hundreds of dogs are killed each day for sale as popular traditional food. Dog-eating as a custom is rooted in Vietnam and was developed as a result of poverty. One kilogram of dog meat costs about 130,000 dongs ($6.2). (Photo by Reuters/Kham)

A chef prepares a cobra meat burger at a Chinese restaurant in the ancient city of Yogyakarta April 1, 2011. Snake hunters catch about 1,000 cobras from Yogyakarta, Central Java and East Java provinces each week to harvest their meat for burgers, priced at 10,000 rupiah ($1.15) each, as well as satay and other dishes. Some customers said they believe cobra meat can cure skin diseases and asthma, and increase sexual virility. (Photo by Dwi Oblo/Reuters) 

A chef prepares a cobra meat burger at a Chinese restaurant in the ancient city of Yogyakarta April 1, 2011. Snake hunters catch about 1,000 cobras from Yogyakarta, Central Java and East Java provinces each week to harvest their meat for burgers, priced at 10,000 rupiah ($1.15) each, as well as satay and other dishes. Some customers said they believe cobra meat can cure skin diseases and asthma, and increase sexual virility. (Photo by Dwi Oblo/Reuters)

Locusts are cooked with olive oil for a discovery lunch in Brussels September 20, 2012. (Photo by Francois Lenoir/Reuters) 

Locusts are cooked with olive oil for a discovery lunch in Brussels September 20, 2012. (Photo by Francois Lenoir/Reuters)

A woman poses with a locust on her tongue at a discovery lunch in Brussels September 20, 2012. Organisers of the event, which included cookery classes, want to draw attention to insects as a source of nutrition. (Photo by Francois Lenoir/Reuters) 

A woman poses with a locust on her tongue at a discovery lunch in Brussels September 20, 2012. Organisers of the event, which included cookery classes, want to draw attention to insects as a source of nutrition. (Photo by Francois Lenoir/Reuters)

Locusts and worms are seen on a spoon after being cooked with olive oil for a discovery lunch in Brussels September 20, 2012. (Photo by Francois Lenoir/Reuters) 

Locusts and worms are seen on a spoon after being cooked with olive oil for a discovery lunch in Brussels September 20, 2012. (Photo by Francois Lenoir/Reuters)

Two snakes are seen inside their compartment in wooden cupboards labelled “Poisonous Snakes”, at a snake soup store in Hong Kong January 29, 2013. There are scores of people in Hong Kong who have through generations tamed snakes to make soup out of them, a traditional cuisine believed to be good for the health. Yet the people behind providing fresh snakes for the savoury meal thought to speed up the body's blood flow and keep it strong in the cold winter months may be doomed, with young people increasingly reluctant to take on a job they see as hard and dirty. (Photo by Bobby Yip/Reuters) 

Two snakes are seen inside their compartment in wooden cupboards labelled “Poisonous Snakes”, at a snake soup store in Hong Kong January 29, 2013. There are scores of people in Hong Kong who have through generations tamed snakes to make soup out of them, a traditional cuisine believed to be good for the health. Yet the people behind providing fresh snakes for the savoury meal thought to speed up the body’s blood flow and keep it strong in the cold winter months may be doomed, with young people increasingly reluctant to take on a job they see as hard and dirty. (Photo by Bobby Yip/Reuters)

Snake meat is seen in a bowl of snake soup served at a snake soup shop in Hong Kong  January 30, 2013. (Photo by Bobby Yip/Reuters) 

Snake meat is seen in a bowl of snake soup served at a snake soup shop in Hong Kong January 30, 2013. (Photo by Bobby Yip/Reuters)

A worker holds cobra meat after the snakes have been stripped of their skins, at a Chinese restaurant in the ancient city of Yogyakarta April 1, 2011. Snake hunters catch about 1,000 cobras from Yogyakarta, Central Java and East Java provinces each week to harvest their meat for burgers, priced at 10,000 rupiah ($1.15) each, as well as satay and other dishes. Some customers said they believe cobra meat can cure skin diseases and asthma, and increase sexual virility. (Photo by Dwi Oblo/Reuters) 

A worker holds cobra meat after the snakes have been stripped of their skins, at a Chinese restaurant in the ancient city of Yogyakarta April 1, 2011. Snake hunters catch about 1,000 cobras from Yogyakarta, Central Java and East Java provinces each week to harvest their meat for burgers, priced at 10,000 rupiah ($1.15) each, as well as satay and other dishes. Some customers said they believe cobra meat can cure skin diseases and asthma, and increase sexual virility. (Photo by Dwi Oblo/Reuters)

A vendor cuts dog meat for sale at his roadside stall in Duong Noi village, outside Hanoi December 16, 2011. While animal rights activists have condemned eating dog meat as cruel treatment of the animals, it is still an accepted popular delicacy for some Vietnamese, as well in some other Asian countries. Duong Noi is well-known as a dog-meat village, where hundreds of dogs are killed each day for sale as popular traditional food. Dog-eating as a custom is rooted in Vietnam and was developed as a result of poverty. One kilogram of dog meat costs about 130,000 dongs ($6.2). (Photo by Reuters/Kham) 

A vendor cuts dog meat for sale at his roadside stall in Duong Noi village, outside Hanoi December 16, 2011. While animal rights activists have condemned eating dog meat as cruel treatment of the animals, it is still an accepted popular delicacy for some Vietnamese, as well in some other Asian countries. Duong Noi is well-known as a dog-meat village, where hundreds of dogs are killed each day for sale as popular traditional food. Dog-eating as a custom is rooted in Vietnam and was developed as a result of poverty. One kilogram of dog meat costs about 130,000 dongs ($6.2). (Photo by Reuters/Kham)

Dog meat or “Dan go gi” in North Korean expression, is placed on a table at a famous restaurant in Pyongyang November 13, 2008. (Photo by Lee Jae-Won/Reuters) 

Dog meat or “Dan go gi” in North Korean expression, is placed on a table at a famous restaurant in Pyongyang November 13, 2008. (Photo by Lee Jae-Won/Reuters)

A cobra embryo is displayed at a snake farm ahead of the Spring Festival in Tainan, southern Taiwan, February 5, 2013. Eating cobra eggs with embryo is believed to be good for health, according to snake farm owner Huang Kuo-nan. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac. (Photo by Pichi Chuang/Reuters) 

A cobra embryo is displayed at a snake farm ahead of the Spring Festival in Tainan, southern Taiwan, February 5, 2013. Eating cobra eggs with embryo is believed to be good for health, according to snake farm owner Huang Kuo-nan. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac. (Photo by Pichi Chuang/Reuters)

A starter dish “Cremeux de mais, fois gras et croustillant de grillons au sarrasin” – creamy corn with crickets' prepared by French chef David Faure in his restaurant “Aphrodite” in Nice on May 2, 2013 in Nice, France. Crickets and worms as produce for culinary requirements cost up to 1250 euros per kilogramme on May 2, 2013 in Nice, France. Faure's restaurant, renowned for it's innovative and inventive cuisine, has been awarded one star in the Michelin Guide. (Photo by Didier Baverel/Getty Images) 

A starter dish “Cremeux de mais, fois gras et croustillant de grillons au sarrasin” – creamy corn with crickets’ prepared by French chef David Faure in his restaurant “Aphrodite” in Nice on May 2, 2013 in Nice, France. Crickets and worms as produce for culinary requirements cost up to 1250 euros per kilogramme on May 2, 2013 in Nice, France. Faure’s restaurant, renowned for it’s innovative and inventive cuisine, has been awarded one star in the Michelin Guide. (Photo by Didier Baverel/Getty Images)

Andean women display a dish of roasted cuy during a guinea pig festival in Huacho, northern Lima, July 20, 2008. The one-day festival includes an animal show and a food and fashion contest which features the guinea pig, native to the Andes. Cuy, a traditional fried or roasted guinea pig dish, dates back at least fifteen centuries to pre-Incan times. (Photo by Mariana Bazo/Reuters) 

Andean women display a dish of roasted cuy during a guinea pig festival in Huacho, northern Lima, July 20, 2008. The one-day festival includes an animal show and a food and fashion contest which features the guinea pig, native to the Andes. Cuy, a traditional fried or roasted guinea pig dish, dates back at least fifteen centuries to pre-Incan times. (Photo by Mariana Bazo/Reuters)

A woman holds a tray of maguey worms at the San Juan food market in Mexico City June 19, 2013. Mexico's taste for eating creepy crawlies, originating from the Pre-Columbian era, could be the answer to ending hunger. United Nations Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) is encouraging the production of edible insects to supplement diets in areas where malnutrition is rife and as a measure to combat obesity. Nowhere has the message been more warmly received than in Mexico where insects have been part of the diet for hundreds of years. Pre-Columbian civilizations in the country ate them frequently as a main source of protein because meat through cattle raising did not exist. Although conquistadors discouraged insect consumption, ethnic groups in the country continued to eat them. (Photo by Henry Romero/Reuters) 

A woman holds a tray of maguey worms at the San Juan food market in Mexico City June 19, 2013. Mexico’s taste for eating creepy crawlies, originating from the Pre-Columbian era, could be the answer to ending hunger. United Nations Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) is encouraging the production of edible insects to supplement diets in areas where malnutrition is rife and as a measure to combat obesity. Nowhere has the message been more warmly received than in Mexico where insects have been part of the diet for hundreds of years. Pre-Columbian civilizations in the country ate them frequently as a main source of protein because meat through cattle raising did not exist. Although conquistadors discouraged insect consumption, ethnic groups in the country continued to eat them. (Photo by Henry Romero/Reuters)

A Chinese woman eats from an ox and dog penis dish at the Guolizhuang “strength in the pot” penis restaurant in China's capital Beijing March 3, 2006. The restaurant offers more than 30 types of animal penises served in a Chinese hotpot style. According to the theory of traditional Chinese medicine, the penis of certain animals is full of nutrients which brings men energy. And because it contains gelatine albumen, it is said to have excellent cosmetic effects for women, especially beneficial for the skin. (Photo by Reinhard Krause/Reuters) 

A Chinese woman eats from an ox and dog penis dish at the Guolizhuang “strength in the pot” penis restaurant in China’s capital Beijing March 3, 2006. The restaurant offers more than 30 types of animal penises served in a Chinese hotpot style. According to the theory of traditional Chinese medicine, the penis of certain animals is full of nutrients which brings men energy. And because it contains gelatine albumen, it is said to have excellent cosmetic effects for women, especially beneficial for the skin. (Photo by Reinhard Krause/Reuters)

Hard-boiled eggs cooked in boys' urine lie inside a pot for sale in Dongyang, Zhejiang province March 26, 2012. It's the end of a school day in the eastern Chinese city of Dongyang, and eager parents collect their children after a hectic day of primary school. But that's just the start of busy times for dozens of egg vendors across the city, deep in coastal Zhejiang province, who ready themselves to cook up a unique springtime snack favoured by local residents. (Photo by Aly Song/Reuters) 

Hard-boiled eggs cooked in boys’ urine lie inside a pot for sale in Dongyang, Zhejiang province March 26, 2012. It’s the end of a school day in the eastern Chinese city of Dongyang, and eager parents collect their children after a hectic day of primary school. But that’s just the start of busy times for dozens of egg vendors across the city, deep in coastal Zhejiang province, who ready themselves to cook up a unique springtime snack favoured by local residents. (Photo by Aly Song/Reuters)

Mexican chef Alejandro Pinon fries ant eggs at the Corazon de Maguey restaurant in Mexico City June 18, 2013. (Photo by Henry Romero/Reuters) 

Mexican chef Alejandro Pinon fries ant eggs at the Corazon de Maguey restaurant in Mexico City June 18, 2013. (Photo by Henry Romero/Reuters)

A vendor holds a snail for sale in his palm at the San Juan food market in Mexico City June 19, 2013. (Photo by Henry Romero/Reuters) 

A vendor holds a snail for sale in his palm at the San Juan food market in Mexico City June 19, 2013. (Photo by Henry Romero/Reuters)

A waitress carries plates of ant eggs (L), maguey worms (R) and grasshoppers at the Corazon de Maguey restaurant in Mexico City June 18, 2013. (Photo by Henry Romero/Reuters) 

A waitress carries plates of ant eggs (L), maguey worms (R) and grasshoppers at the Corazon de Maguey restaurant in Mexico City June 18, 2013. (Photo by Henry Romero/Reuters)

A boy rests his head on his bicycle while waiting for customers to buy his crabs on a street in Cedeno, 150 km (93 miles) south of Honduras September 12, 2012. (Photo by Jorge Cabrera/Reuters) A boy sits on his bicycle while waiting for customers to buy his crabs on a street in Cedeno, 150 km (93 miles) south of Honduras September 12, 2012. (Photo by Jorge Cabrera/Reuters) 

A boy sits on his bicycle while waiting for customers to buy his crabs on a street in Cedeno, 150 km (93 miles) south of Honduras September 12, 2012. (Photo by Jorge Cabrera/Reuters)

A man holds an Uromastyx lizard, also known as a dabb lizard, in a desert near Tabuk April 19, 2013. The lizards, which are considered a delicacy in some parts of the Middle East, are caught in the spring season using hooks and sniffer dogs as well as bare hands. The lizards can be grilled or eaten raw, and according to popular belief, their blood is used to strengthen the body and treat diseases. (Photo by Mohamed Al Hwaity/Reuters) 

A man holds an Uromastyx lizard, also known as a dabb lizard, in a desert near Tabuk April 19, 2013. The lizards, which are considered a delicacy in some parts of the Middle East, are caught in the spring season using hooks and sniffer dogs as well as bare hands. The lizards can be grilled or eaten raw, and according to popular belief, their blood is used to strengthen the body and treat diseases. (Photo by Mohamed Al Hwaity/Reuters)

A man eats a part of an Uromastyx lizard, also known as a dabb lizard, in a desert near Tabuk April 19, 2013. (Photo by Mohamed Al Hwaity/Reuters) 

A man eats a part of an Uromastyx lizard, also known as a dabb lizard, in a desert near Tabuk April 19, 2013. (Photo by Mohamed Al Hwaity/Reuters)

A traditional dish known as Kabsa is seen with a tail of an Uromastyx lizard, also known as a dabb lizard, in a desert near Tabuk April 19, 2013. (Photo by Mohamed Al Hwaity/Reuters) 

A traditional dish known as Kabsa is seen with a tail of an Uromastyx lizard, also known as a dabb lizard, in a desert near Tabuk April 19, 2013. (Photo by Mohamed Al Hwaity/Reuters)

A raw blood dish is displayed with cooked entrails at a restaurant in Hanoi April 28, 2009. Frozen pudding from fresh duck or pig blood is a popular dish in the Southeast Asian country although duck blood is less consumed following bird flu outbreaks that have killed at least 55 Vietnamese since late 2003. In Vietnam, there appeared to be a degree of confusion towards swine flu which is not in fact linked to pigs alone – but an assortment of swine, human and avian viruses. One bowl of raw blood costs VND10,000 ($0.55). (Photo by Reuters/Kham) 

A raw blood dish is displayed with cooked entrails at a restaurant in Hanoi April 28, 2009. Frozen pudding from fresh duck or pig blood is a popular dish in the Southeast Asian country although duck blood is less consumed following bird flu outbreaks that have killed at least 55 Vietnamese since late 2003. In Vietnam, there appeared to be a degree of confusion towards swine flu which is not in fact linked to pigs alone – but an assortment of swine, human and avian viruses. One bowl of raw blood costs VND10,000 ($0.55). (Photo by Reuters/Kham)

A vendor selling deep-fried spiders poses with a spider as she waits for customers at bus station at Skun, Kampong Cham province, east of Phnom Penh March 14, 2009. It costs $2 for 10 deep-fried spiders, which come seasoned with garlic. The fist-sized arachnids are crunchy on the outside and taste like cold, gooey chicken on the inside. (Photo by Chor Sokunthea/Reuters) 

A vendor selling deep-fried spiders poses with a spider as she waits for customers at bus station at Skun, Kampong Cham province, east of Phnom Penh March 14, 2009. It costs $2 for 10 deep-fried spiders, which come seasoned with garlic. The fist-sized arachnids are crunchy on the outside and taste like cold, gooey chicken on the inside. (Photo by Chor Sokunthea/Reuters)

Thai farm employee Somsak Inta, 36, puts two house lizards in his mouth prior to eating them in Nakorn Nayok province, 60 kilometers away from Bangkok April 9, 2008. Somsak started eating lizards when was 16 as a means to treat health problems, which he claims could not be cured by modern medicine. He has since been eating lizards for over 20 years, believing, among other things, it increases his sex drive. (Photo by Reuters) 

Thai farm employee Somsak Inta, 36, puts two house lizards in his mouth prior to eating them in Nakorn Nayok province, 60 kilometers away from Bangkok April 9, 2008. Somsak started eating lizards when was 16 as a means to treat health problems, which he claims could not be cured by modern medicine. He has since been eating lizards for over 20 years, believing, among other things, it increases his sex drive. (Photo by Reuters)

Mealworm quiches are seen at the Rijn IJssel school for chefs in Wageningen January 12, 2011. All you need to do to save the rainforest, improve your diet, better your health, cut global carbon emissions and slash your food budget is eat bugs. Mealworm quiche, grasshopper springrolls and cuisine made from other creepy crawlies is the answer to the global food crisis, shrinking land and water resources and climate-changing carbon emissions, Dutch scientist Arnold van Huis says. To attract more insect-eaters, Van Huis and his team of scientists at Wageningen have worked with a local cooking school to produce a cookbook and suitable recipes. (Photo by Jerry Lampen/Reuters) 

Mealworm quiches are seen at the Rijn IJssel school for chefs in Wageningen January 12, 2011. All you need to do to save the rainforest, improve your diet, better your health, cut global carbon emissions and slash your food budget is eat bugs. Mealworm quiche, grasshopper springrolls and cuisine made from other creepy crawlies is the answer to the global food crisis, shrinking land and water resources and climate-changing carbon emissions, Dutch scientist Arnold van Huis says. To attract more insect-eaters, Van Huis and his team of scientists at Wageningen have worked with a local cooking school to produce a cookbook and suitable recipes. (Photo by Jerry Lampen/Reuters)

A typical dish in ant sauce is seen in the restaurant Color de Hormiga in Barichara May 19, 2009. Every year during the April-June season thousands of Colombian farmers and inhabitants of Santander province collect ants culonas (Atta Laevigata) as part of a traditional ritual in the region. The ants, named “Culonas” for their big size, are cooked and sold as exotic, specialized food. (Photo by Jose Miguel Gomez/Reuters) 

A typical dish in ant sauce is seen in the restaurant Color de Hormiga in Barichara May 19, 2009. Every year during the April-June season thousands of Colombian farmers and inhabitants of Santander province collect ants culonas (Atta Laevigata) as part of a traditional ritual in the region. The ants, named “Culonas” for their big size, are cooked and sold as exotic, specialized food. (Photo by Jose Miguel Gomez/Reuters)

Rasima, a villager, dries “ampo”, a traditional snack made from clean, gravel-free dark earth, in Tuban, East Java province March 29, 2010. Rasima is the village's only ampo producer, and can earn up to $2 a day to supplement her family's income from farming. Although there is no medical evidence, villagers believe the soil snacks are an effective pain-killer and pregnant women are encouraged to eat them as it is believed to refine the skin of the unborn baby. (Photo by Sigit Pamungkas/Reuters) 

Rasima, a villager, dries “ampo”, a traditional snack made from clean, gravel-free dark earth, in Tuban, East Java province March 29, 2010. Rasima is the village’s only ampo producer, and can earn up to $2 a day to supplement her family’s income from farming. Although there is no medical evidence, villagers believe the soil snacks are an effective pain-killer and pregnant women are encouraged to eat them as it is believed to refine the skin of the unborn baby. (Photo by Sigit Pamungkas/Reuters)

San Smey, 4, eats a piece of roasted rat in the provincial town of Battambang, 290 km (181 miles) northwest of the capital Phnom Penh February 19, 2004. Meat-eaters were forced to shy away from chicken because of the deadly bird flu virus that was rampant across Asia. (Photo by Chor Sokunthea/Reuters) 

San Smey, 4, eats a piece of roasted rat in the provincial town of Battambang, 290 km (181 miles) northwest of the capital Phnom Penh February 19, 2004. Meat-eaters were forced to shy away from chicken because of the deadly bird flu virus that was rampant across Asia. (Photo by Chor Sokunthea/Reuters)

Ms Bertha Piranes drops a skinned frog into a blender to make a drink at a market in San Juan de Lurigancho, Lima, on Aug 16, 2006. The drink, popular with working-class Peruvians, is believed to cure illnesses ranging from fatigue to sexual impotency. (Photo by Reuters) 

Ms Bertha Piranes drops a skinned frog into a blender to make a drink at a market in San Juan de Lurigancho, Lima, on Aug 16, 2006. The drink, popular with working-class Peruvians, is believed to cure illnesses ranging from fatigue to sexual impotency. (Photo by Reuters)

An indigenous Miskito woman sells turtle meat at a town market in Puerto Cabezas, along Nicaragua's Caribbean coast August 25, 2010. Around five hundred turtles are sold for food per month in the port. The going rate for turtle meat is approximately $1.10 per pound. (Photo by Oswaldo Rivas/Reuters) 

An indigenous Miskito woman sells turtle meat at a town market in Puerto Cabezas, along Nicaragua’s Caribbean coast August 25, 2010. Around five hundred turtles are sold for food per month in the port. The going rate for turtle meat is approximately $1.10 per pound. (Photo by Oswaldo Rivas/Reuters)

A worker cuts up a roasted cat in the back room of a restaurant in the Ivory Coast. Cat meat is a traditional food in much of Africa and Asia. (Photo by Reuters) 

A worker cuts up a roasted cat in the back room of a restaurant in the Ivory Coast. Cat meat is a traditional food in much of Africa and Asia. (Photo by Reuters)

 Source and Courtesy : Avaznews