Know : List of Foods’ Storage Periods

 

Food-storage-shelf-items

Proper food storage helps maintain food quality by retaining flavor, color, texture and nutrients, while reducing the chance of contracting a food-borne illness. Foods can be classified into three groups.

  • Perishable foods include meat, poultry, fish, milk, eggs and many raw fruits and vegetables. All cooked foods are considered perishable foods. To store these foods for any length of time, perishable foods need to be held at refrigerator or freezer temperatures. If refrigerated, perishable foods should be used within several days.
  • Semi-perishable foods, if properly stored and handled, may remain unspoiled for six months to about one year. Flour, grain products, dried fruits and dry mixes are considered semi-perishable.
  • Staple, or non-perishable, foods such as sugar, dried beans, spices and canned goods do not spoil unless they are handled carelessly. These foods will lose quality, however, if stored over a long time, even if stored under ideal conditions.

There is no exact method to determine how long a food will maintain quality and be safe to eat, because many conditions affect the quality. The storage life of foods is affected by the:

  • freshness of the food when it reached the grocery store
  • length of time and the temperature at which it was held before purchase
  • temperature of your food storage areas
  • humidity level in your food storage areas
  • type of storage container or packaging the food is stored in
  • characteristics of the food item

 

Storage Periods for Retaining Food Quality
Food Room Temperature Refrigerator Freezer at 0°F
Milk/Milk Products
Milk 1 week 1 month
Butter 2 weeks 12 months
Canned or dry milk (unopened) 6 months
Cottage cheese 1 week 3 months
Cream 1-2 weeks
Ice cream 2-3 weeks
Margarine 1 month 12 months
Natural cheese 1 month 4-6 months
Processed cheese 1 month 4-6 months
Sour cream, buttermilk, cream cheese 2 weeks Not recommended
Yogurt 1 month
Meat
Fresh roasts, steaks, chops 3-4 days 2-3 months
Fresh livers, hearts, kidneys, other variety meats 1-2 days 3-4 months
Fresh ground meat, stew meat 1-2 days 3-4 months
Cured pork and lunch meat 1 week Not recommended
Cooked meat, gravies made with meat stock 2-3 days 2-3 months
Canned meat 1 year
Meat pies, stews, casseroles, meat salads 2-3 days 3 months
Hotdogs 1 week (opened) 2 weeks (unopened) 1-2 months
Bacon 7 days 1 month
Sausage, raw from pork, beef, turkey 1-2 days 1-2 months
Hard sausage-pepperoni, jerky sticks 2-3 weeks 1-2 months
Poultry/Eggs
Fresh poultry 2 days 6-8 months
Cooked poultry 2-3 days 6 months
Poultry stuffing 1 day
Poultry pies, stews, creamed dishes, gravies 1 day 6 months
Poultry salads 1 day
Eggs 2-4 weeks 1 year
Raw yolk, whites 2-4 days 1 year
Hardcooked eggs 1 week Not recommended
Liquid pasteurized eggs or egg substitutes 10 days (unopened) 3 days (opened) 1 year (unopened)
Egg-containing products: custards, custard sauces, puddings, custard-filled pastries or cakes 1-2 days Not recommended
Puddings, canned 1-2 days (opened)
Fish/Seafood
Fresh fish 1-2 days 3-6 months
Cooked fish 3-4 days 1 month
Fish salad 1 day
Smoked fish 10 days 4-5 weeks
Canned fish 1 year Not recommended
Dried or pickled fish 3-4 weeks
Clams, oyster (shucked) and scallops 7-9 days
Crab 7 days 2 months
Shrimp 3-5 days 6-12 months
Lobster (shelled or unshelled) 3-7 days 6-12 months
Wild Game
Venison 3-5 days 3-4 months
Rabbit, squirrel 1-2 days 12 months
Wild duck, pheasant, goose(whole) 1-2 days 6 months
Fruits
Apples Until ripe 1 month
Citrus fruits 2-6 weeks
Grapes 1-3 weeks
Melons, most varieties 1 week
Peaches, nectarines 2-3 weeks
Pears (mature but not fully ripe) 1-3 months
Pineapple, ripe 1 week
Other fresh fruit Until ripe 3-5 days 9-12 months
Canned fruit 1 year 2-4 days (opened)
Dried fruit 6 months 2-4 days (cooked)
Fruit juice concentrates 1 year
Canned fruit juices 1 year 3-4 days (opened)
Vegetables
Asparagus 2-3 days
Broccoli, brussels sprouts, green peas, green onions, lima beans, rhubarb, greens, summer squash, mushrooms 3-5 days
Cabbage, cauliflower, celery, cucumbers, snap beans, lettuce, peppers, tomatoes 1 week
Carrots, beets, parsnips, radishes, turnips 2 weeks
Corn 1 day
White potatoes, sweet potatoes, winter squash, rutabagas, dry onions 1 week (several months at 50-60°F)
Canned or dried vegetables 1 year 1-4 days (opened/cooked)
Cereal Products
Flour, white 1 year
Flour, whole or wheat 6-8 months 1 year
Rice, white 2 years
Rice, brown 6 months
Ready-to-eat cereals 1 year
Uncooked cereals 1 year
Pasta 1 year
Corn meal 1 year
Bakery Goods
Breads, baked with no preservatives 2-3 weeks 2-3 months
Breads, quick, baked 2 months
Cake, angel 6-12 months
Cake, baked, frosted 1 month
Cake, baked, unfrosted 2-4 months
Cakes, batter 1 month
Cakes, fruit 6-12 months
Cinnamon rolls, partially baked 2 months
Cookies, baked, homemade 2-3 weeks 6-12 months
Cookies, dough 1-2 days 3 months
Cookies, packaged 2 months 12-18 months
Crackers 2 months
Doughnuts, unfrosted 2-4 months
Muffins, baked 6-12 months
Pies, fruit 2-3 days (baked) 1-2 days (unbaked) 6-8 months (baked) 2-4 months (unbaked)
Pies, pumpkin or chiffon 2-3 days 1-2 months
Rolls and bread, unbaked 2-3 weeks 1 month
Waffles 1 month
Mixes/Packaged Foods
Biscuit, brownie, muffin mix 9 months
Cake mixes 6-9 months
Casserole mix 9-12 months
Cookies, homemade 2-3 weeks
Cookies, packaged 2 months
Crackers 3 months
Croutons and bread crumbs 6 months 6 months 1 year
Frosting, canned 3 months
Frosting, mix 8 months
Hot roll mix 18 months
Pancake mix 6-9 months
Piecrust, mix 6-9 months
Potatoes, instant 6-12 months
Rice mixes 6 months
Sauce and gravy mixes 6-12 months
Soup mixes 12 months
Toaster pastries 2-3 months
Other Foods
Baking powder 18 months
Baking soda 2 years
Chocolate syrup 2 years (unopened) 6 months (opened)
Cocoa mixes 8 months
Coffee, lighteners (dry) 9 months (unopened) 6 months (opened)
Cornstarch 18 months
Gelatin 18 months
Pectin 1 year
Salad dressings, bottled 12 months (unopened) 1-3 months (opened) Not recommended
Sugar, brown 18 months
Sugar, confectioners’ 18 months
Sugar, granulated 2 years
Vinegar 2 years (unopened) 1 year (opened)
Cheese, parmesan, grated 10 months (unopened) 2 months (opened)
Coconut, shredded 12 months (unopened) 6 months (opened)
Imitation bacon bits, etc. 4 months
Peas, beans, dried 12 months
Popcorn 2 years
Whipped topping, dry 12 months
Yeast, dry Expiration date on package
Honey, jams, syrups, molasses 1 year
Nuts, unshelled 6 months
Nuts, shelled 6 months
Peanut butter 6 months (unopened) 2 months (opened)
Chocolate 1 year
Coffee 1 year (unopened) 2-4 weeks (opened)
Coffee, instant 6 months (unopened) 2 months (opened)
Pudding mixes 1 year
Shortening, solid 8 months
Vegetable oils 1-3 months
Tea, bags or loose 1 year
Tea, instant 1 year
Soft drinks 3 months
Bouillon products 1 year
Mayonnaise 10-12 weeks Not recommended
Spices, Herbs, Condiments, Extracts
Catsup, chili sauce 12 months (unopened) 1 month (opened)
Mustard, prepared yellow (refrigerate 2 years (unopened) for longer storage) 6-8 months (opened)
Spices, whole 1-2 years
Spices, ground 6 months
Herbs 6 months
Herb/spice blends 2 years (unopened) 12 months (opened)
Other extracts 12 months

Exclusive Cupboard Storage Chart
• Store foods in cool cabinets and away from appliances which produce heat.
• Many staples and canned foods have a relatively long shelf life, but buy only what you can expect to use within the time recommended in the chart. Date food packages and use the oldest first. Foods stored for longer than recommended times or beyond date on the package may change quality, color and flavor.
• Buy fresh-looking packages. Dusty cans or torn labels can indicate old stock. Do not purchase dented or bulging cans.

Cupboard Storage Cupboard Storage2

Courtesy & Credits : UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA–LINCOLN &  North Dakota State University

Excerpts from original articles by


 

Know : Two Reasons to Stop Drinking Milk (Part 2 of 2)

They are huge, but very docile. The native breed is creamy white in colour, with a distinctive hump. Sometimes the pious people of India can be seen feeding a roadside cow with a carrot or chappati or some water.

The two reasons to stop drinking milk are The Health perspective and The Moral perspective to save the cows. This is the second part we see the Moral perspective

Even if the Indian cow eats paper and plastic surprisingly there is negligible effect on its milk and urine as they take all ill effects in its own body.

Even if the Indian cow eats paper and plastic surprisingly there is negligible effect on its milk and urine as they take all ill effects in its own body.

What happens in Dairy farming?

Crated_CalvescowFor many people, dairy farming conjures up images of small herds of cows leisurely grazing on open pastures. Although scenes like this still exist, most milk is produced by cows raised in intensive production systems. Some cows are housed indoors year-round and lactating cows are often kept restrained in tie stalls or stanchions.

Although they don’t reach mature size until at least 4 years old, dairy cows first give birth at about 2 years of age and are usually bred again beginning at about 60 days after giving birth, to maintain a yearly schedule.

Most dairy calves are removed from their mothers immediately after birth. The males are mainly sold for veal or castrated and raised for beef. “Bob veal” calves are killed as soon as a few days after birth; those used to produce “special-fed veal” are typically kept tethered in individual stalls until slaughtered at about 16 to 20 weeks of age. The female calves are commonly subjected to tail docking, dehorning, and the removal of “extra” teats. Until weaned at 8 weeks of age, most female calves are fed colostrum, then a milk replacer or unsaleable waste milk. Each year hundreds of thousands of these female calves die between 48 hours and 8 weeks of age, mostly due to scours, diarrhea, and other digestive problems.

What about Cows in India?

People for Ethical Treatment of Animals (Peta), backed up by The Independent’s own investigation, which reveals the Indian treatment of its holiest animal as a scandal of cruelty, greed and corruption.

The cow’s special status in India is enshrined in law. Some States allow the slaughter of cattle with restrictions like a “fit-for-slaughter” certificate which may be issued depending on factors like age and gender of cattle, continued economic viability etc. Others completely ban cattle slaughter, while there is no restriction in a few states, most notably Kerala. By default, Bulls and bullocks and she-buffaloes are protected up to 15 years of age. But all this apparent reverence and protection masks a trade in cows and cow products which involves unbelievable barbarity and cruelty. 

The issues of slaughtering

Cows are routinely shipped to states with lower or no requirement for slaughter, even though most States make it illegal to transport the animals for slaughter across State borders. Many illegal slaughterhouses operate in large cities such as Chennai and Mumbai. While there are approximately 3,600 slaughterhouses operating legally in India, there are estimated to be over 30,000 illegal slaughterhouses.

Much of the abuse stems from the fact that the trade in and slaughter of cows is almost entirely clandestine and illegal – but the authorities which should be stopping it are routinely bribed to let it continue. There is, therefore, no scrutiny or regulation of the trade anywhere along the line. Much Indian beef finds its way to the Middle East and Europe from Kerala and Bangladesh

Some cruel stats

cow2The slaughter of cows has been banned in all Indian states and territories except West Bengal, in the north-east, and Kerala in the far south. But the main result is an appalling traffic of cattle. There is a huge amount of trafficking of cattle to both West Bengal and Kerala. The ones going to West Bengal go by truck and train and they go by the millions. The law says you cannot transport more than 4 per truck but they are putting in up to 70. When they go by train, each wagon is supposed to hold 80 to 100, but they cram in up to 900, 400 to 500 of them go out dead.

Insane practice

“In Kerala they also have a unique way of killing them – they beat their heads to a pulp with a dozen hammer blows. A well-intentioned visitor from the West, trying to improve slaughterhouse practice in Kerala, exhorted them to use stun guns, saying that the meat of an animal killed in this fashion (rather than having its throat slit) tasted sweeter. The stun guns that she left behind quickly broke and fell into disuse, but the belief that the meat was sweeter took hold – which explains this horrible method of slaughtering.” 

US Statistics

cow_downed6Between 1940 and 2012, the average amount of milk produced per cow rose from 2 tons per year to 10 tons. Although genetic selection and feeding are used to increase production efficiency, cows do not adapt well to high milk yields or their high grain diets.7 Metabolic disorders are common, and millions of cows suffer from mastitis (a very painful infection of the udder), lameness, and infertility problems.

The term “downer” refers to an animal who is too injured, weak, or sick to stand and walk. The exact number of downer cattle on U.S. farms or feedlots or sent to slaughter facilities is difficult to ascertain, but estimates approach 500,000 animals per year; most are dairy cows. Complications associated with calving and injuries from slipping and falling are leading causes, and the condition most often occurs within one day of giving birth.

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Courtesy : ajitvadakayil.blogspot.comveganoutreach.orgindependent.co.uk

Read the Part 1: The Health perspective to stop drinking milk


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Know : Two Reasons to Stop Drinking Milk (Part 1 of 2)

The two reasons to stop drinking milk are The Health perspective and The Moral perspective to save the cows.

This is the first part we see the health perspective

Milk nutritional factChoose Vegetable Calcium Over Animal Calcium

A lot of people believe a vegetable-based diet, which excludes milk and cheese, doesn’t provide enough calcium. Fruits and vegetables contain ample amounts of calcium and this veggie-calcium is actually retained more efficiently in our bodies.

Green vegetables, beans, tofu, sesame seeds, and even oranges contain lots of usable calcium, without problems associated with dairy. Keep in mind that you retain the calcium better and just do not need as much when you don’t consume a diet heavy in animal products , sugar and sodium, and caffeine.

Despite its reputation, milk’s calcium-absorption rate is lower than what you might think:

Many green vegetables have calcium-absorption rates of over 50 percent, compared with about 32 percent for milk. 1 Additionally, since animal protein induces calcium excretion in the urine, the calcium retention from vegetables is higher. All green vegetables are high in calcium.

Cow’s Milk and Kids Aren’t Made for Each Other

The leading cause of digestive intolerance leading to stomach complaints is dairy products. Many kids have subtle allergies to cow’s milk that perpetuate their nasal congestion, leading to ear infections.

0404_milkMilk, which is designed by nature for the rapidly growing cow, has about half its calories supplied from fat. The fatty component is concentrated more to make cheese and butter. Milk and cheese are the foods that many encourage their children to eat, believing them to be healthy foods. Fifty years of heavy advertising by economically powerful industries has shaped the public’s perception, illustrating the power of one-sided advertising, but the reality and true health effects on our children is a different story. Besides the link between high-saturated-fat foods (dairy fat) and cancer, there is a body of scientific literature linking the consumption of cow’s milk to many other diseases. If we expect our children to resist many common illnesses, they simply must consume less milk, cheese, and butter. Dairy foods should be consumed in limited quantity or not at all.

Cow’s milk contains the calcium people need, but other foods are rich in calcium, too, including vegetables, beans, nuts, and seeds. Today we do not need to rely on cows for our calcium. We can eat greens directly for calcium, the place where cows get it to begin with, and orange juice and soy milks are fortified with calcium and vitamin D, too. It is easy to meet our nutrient needs for these substances without the risks of cow’s milk.

So, health wise, we have enough alternatives to choose than milk. Then what is the Moral perspective to stop drinking milk. Just wait for our update tomorrow.

Courtesy : Excerpts from Dr. Fuhrman’s www.diseaseproof.com

Read the Part 2: The Moral perspective to stop drinking milk

______________________

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Food We Eat : Conventional Breakfast (30 Countries)

Argentina: Danish Pastries filled with Custard

Breakfast (1)

Australia: Cold Cereal, Milk and Toast
Breakfast (2)

Brazil: Ham, Cheese, Bread, Milk, Coffee
Breakfast (3)

Canada: Eggs, Potatoes, Sausage, Ham, Pancakes
Breakfast (4)

Chile: Bread and Cheese, Jelly or Yogurt and Cereal
Breakfast (30)

China: Dim sum
Breakfast (5)

Colombia: Changua Milk, Scallion, and Egg soup
Breakfast (6)

Cuba: Cuban Bread dunked in Sweetened Coffee
Breakfast (7)

Egypt: Fava Beans, Chickpeas, Hard Boiled Egg, Veggies
Breakfast (8)

England: Eggs, Sausage, Bacon, Beans, and Mushrooms
Breakfast (9)

Finland: Open Sandwiches, Cheese, Cold Cuts, Cereal
Breakfast (10)

France: Croissants and Coffee
Breakfast (11)

Ghana: Rice cooked with Beans and Spices
Breakfast (12)

Germany: Cold Meats, Sausages, Cheese, Bread
Breakfast (13)

India: Idli Wada- Fermented Black Lentils and Rice
Breakfast (14)

Italy: Cappuccino and Hard Roll or Biscotti
Breakfast (15)

Japan: Miso soup, Cteamed Rice, and Pickles
Breakfast (16)

Mexico: Huevos rancheros, Chorizo, Tortillas and Coffee
Breakfast (17)

Mongolia: Fatty, Boiled Mutton with Rice
Breakfast (18)

Morocco: Breads with Jam, and Cheese or Butter
Breakfast (19)

Nigeria: Moi Moi Ground Bean in a Wrap
Breakfast (20)

Pakistan: Bread filled with Vegetables
Breakfast (21)

Peru: Bread with Butter, Jam, Cheese, Ham, Oatmeal
Breakfast (22)

Poland: Chleb bread, Cold Meats, Eggs, Cottage Cheese
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Portugal: Stuffed Croissants with Jam or Cheese, Coffee
Breakfast (24)

Russia: Russian Oladi, Yeast Pancakes and Oatmeal
Breakfast (25)

Spain: Caf con leche, Sweet Rolls with Jam, Cheese
Breakfast (26)

Thailand: Pork heart, Pork Intestine, Chinese doughnuts
Breakfast (27)

Turkey: Bread, Cheese, Butter, Olives, Eggs
Breakfast (28)

USA: Eggs, Pancakes, Sausage, Bacon, Hash Browns
Breakfast (29)