Know : TomTato – Tomato and Potato on the same plant

By combining the genes of tomatoes and potatoes they were able to create a “TomTato”, which is essentially a plant that grows tomatoes and potatoes at the same time. This is the creation of Thompson and Morgan.

TomTato (4)

TomTato (1) TomTato (2) TomTato (3)  TomTato (5)

Courtesy: Thompson and Morgan (For more details please visit their website, we shared this on our blog for educational and non-profit purposes only.


Know: Gene splicing is a post-transcriptional modification in which a single gene can code for multiple proteins. Gene Splicing is done in eukaryotes, prior to mRNA translation, by the differential inclusion or exclusion of regions of pre-mRNA. Gene splicing is an important source of protein diversity. During a typical gene splicing event, the pre-mRNA transcribed from one gene can lead to different mature mRNA molecules that generate multiple functional proteins. Thus, gene splicing enables a single gene to increase its coding capacity, allowing the synthesis of protein isoforms that are structurally and functionally distinct. Gene splicing is observed in high proportion of genes. In human cells, about 40-60% of the genes are known to exhibit alternative splicing.

Earth Our Home Too : Cute ‘Arctic Hares’

The arctic hare (Lepus arcticus), or polar rabbit, is a species of hare which is adapted largely to polar and mountainous habitats. The arctic hare survives with a thick coat of fur and usually digs holes in the ground or under snow to keep warm and sleep. Arctic hares look like rabbits, but have shorter ears, are taller when standing, and, unlike rabbits, can thrive in cold climates. They can travel together with many other hares, sometimes huddling with dozens or more, but are usually found alone, taking, in some cases, more than one partner. The arctic hare can run up to 60 kilometres per hour (40 mph). Its predators include the arctic wolf, arctic fox, and ermine.

Arctic Hare (7)

The arctic hare is distributed over the tundra regions of Greenland and the northernmost parts of Canada, while they also live as far south as the Island of Newfoundland In Newfoundland and southern Labrador, the arctic hare changes its coat colour, moulting and growing new fur, from brown or grey in the summer to white in the winter, like some other arctic animals including ermine and ptarmigan, enabling it to remain camouflaged as their environments change. However, the arctic hares in the far north of Canada, where summer is very short, remain white all year round.

The arctic hare is one of the largest living lagomorphs. On average, this species measures from 43 to 70 cm (17 to 28 in) long, not counting a tail length of 4.5–10 cm (1.8–3.9 in). The body mass of this species is typically between 2.5–5.5 kg (6–12 lb), though large individuals can weigh up to 7 kg (15 lb).

The arctic hare’s diet consists primarily of woody plants, but can also include buds, berries, leaves, and grasses. In the early summer it consumes purple saxifrage. It has a keen sense of smell and may dig for willow twigs under the snow. When foraging for plants, the arctic hare prefers spots with less snow so it may more easily locate fallen twigs or plants on the ground for it to feed on.

Female hares can have up to eight baby hares called leverets. The leverets stay within the mother’s home range until they are old enough to survive on their own.Their life spans average 5 years if they are not killed by their predators or do not die of unnatural causes.