Eco Preservation : The brilliance of bioluminescence

Some lucky animals are naturally endowed with bioluminescence, or the ability to create light. The firefly, the anglerfish, and a few more surprising creatures use this ability in many ways, including survival, hunting, and mating. Leslie Kenna investigates this magical glow – and our quest to replicate it.

Eco-Preservation : Bioluminescence

Glowing Bioluminescent Plankton
Bioluminescence is the production and emission of light by a living organism. Bioluminescence occurs widely in marine vertebrates and invertebrates, as well as in some fungi, microorganisms and terrestrial invertebrates. Some symbiotic organisms carried within larger organisms produce light.
Glowing Bioluminescent Plankton

Before the development of the safety lamp for use in coal mines, dried fish skins were used in Britain and Europe as a weak source of light

Glowing Bioluminescent Plankton

Bioluminescence is a form of luminescence, or “cold light” emission by living organisms; less than 20% of the light generates thermal radiation. It should not be confused with iridescencestructural colorationphosphorescence.

By etymology, bioluminescence is a hybrid word, originating from the Greek bios for “living” and the Latin lumen “light”.

Bioluminescence is a form of chemiluminescence where light energy is released by a chemical reactionFirefliesanglerfish, and other creatures produce the chemicals luciferin (a pigment) and luciferase (an enzyme). The luciferin reacts with oxygen to create light. The luciferase acts as a catalyst to speed up the reaction, which is sometimes mediated by cofactors such as calcium ions or ATP. The chemical reaction can occur either inside or outside the cell. In bacteria, the expression of genes related to bioluminescence is controlled by an operon called the Lux operon.
Glowing Bioluminescent Plankton 

Bioluminescence occurs widely among some groups of animals, especially in the open sea; in some fungi and bacteria; and in various terrestrial invertebrates including insects. Many, perhaps most deep-sea animals produce light. Most marine light-emission is in the blue and green light spectrum, the wavelengths that pass furthest through seawater. However, some loose-jawed fish emit red and infrared light, and the genusTomopteris emits yellow light. Sometimes thousands of square miles of the ocean shine with the light of bioluminescent bacteria in the “Milky seas effect“.

Non-marine bioluminescence is less widely distributed. The two best-known forms of land bioluminescence are fireflies and glow worms. Other insects, insect larvaeannelidsarachnids and even species of fungi have been noted to possess bioluminescent abilities. Some forms of bioluminescence are brighter (or exist only) at night, following a circadian rhythm.

Glowing Bioluminescent Plankton 

Bioluminescent organisms are a target for many areas of research. Luciferase systems are widely used in the field of genetic engineering as reporter genes. Luciferase systems have also been harnessed for biomedical research usingbioluminescence imagingVibrio symbiosis with numerous marine invertebrates and fish, namely the Hawaiian Bobtail Squid (Euprymna scolopes), are key experimental models for bioluminescence.

The structures of photophores, the light producing organs in bioluminescent organisms, are being investigated byindustrial designers. Engineered bioluminescence could perhaps one day be used to reduce the need for street lighting, or for decorative purposes.

The gene that makes firefly‘s tails glow has been added to mustard plants. The plants glow faintly for an hour when touched, but a sensitive camera is needed to see the glow

File:Glowing tobacco plant.jpg

Glowing Bioluminescent Plankton
Glowing Bioluminescent Plankton
Glowing Bioluminescent Plankton
Glowing Bioluminescent Plankton
Glowing Bioluminescent Plankton
Glowing Bioluminescent Plankton
Glowing Bioluminescent Plankton
Glowing Bioluminescent Plankton
Glowing Bioluminescent Plankton

Disclaimer : Shared for non profit purpose and used permalinks to the original image sources 
and we do not own any copyrights or ownership on these pictures and the information shared 
are from wikipedia. Please let us know if anything need to be notified or concerns you.

Courtesy and Source : Wikipedia, Avaxnews, Aquaviews