Scribbling of the Day : Homeless Birds

Bird's home

A new Villa, a new dawn
His day started
with a lemon tea
and the fragrance of the mist.

There came a guest
He felt the poet in him
“Do you have a home?”
he inquired within.

“Look!” gestured
his guest flapped the wings
and began flying high to show
it’s little home – Earth!

His Villa
shrunk little as a hut.


Din

‪#‎Scribbling_of_the_Day‬


Earth Our Home Too : Golden Crowned Kinglet

Golden_Crowned Kinglet (1)

The golden-crowned kinglet (Regulus satrapa) is a very small songbird.

Golden_Crowned Kinglet (2)

Adults are olive-gray on the upperparts with white underparts, with thin bills and short tails. They have white wing bars, a black stripe through the eyes and a yellow crown surrounded by black. The adult male has an orange patch in the middle of the yellow crown.

 Golden_Crowned Kinglet (3)

Their breeding habitat is coniferous forests across Canada, the northeastern and western United States, Mexico and Central America. They nest in a well-concealed hanging cup suspended from a conifer branch.

Golden_Crowned Kinglet (4) Golden_Crowned Kinglet (5)

These birds migrate to the United States. Some birds are permanent residents in coastal regions and in the southern parts of their range. Northern birds remain further north in winter than the ruby-crowned kinglet.

Golden_Crowned Kinglet (6) Golden_Crowned Kinglet (7)

They forage actively in trees or shrubs, mainly eating insects, insect eggs and spiders.

Golden_Crowned Kinglet

They give a series of high-pitched calls on a single note, and tend not to fear human approach.

Golden_Crowned Kinglet (9)

The four continental Regulus species all have very large ranges and populations. The two single-island endemics are common within their habitat, and are not thought to be at risk. All kinglets are therefore classed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

Know : A Big List of Animal Sounds

Here is a big list of how we call the sounds of Animals in English. If you want to know how they call the sounds in any other language, please use this useful website What is Called

Alligators hiss, grunt, roar, quak,
Antelopes snort,
Anteaters hrow, Lesser Anteater.jpg
Badgers growl,
Bats screech, Big-eared-townsend-fledermaus.jpg
Bears growl, groan, moan, roar,
Bees hum, buzz, Honeybee landing on milkthistle02.jpg
Beetles drone, click, Drawing-1.png
Birds chirrup, chirp, twitter, tweet, sing, whistle, Bird Diversity 2013.png
Bitterns boom,  American Bittern Seney NWR 1.jpg
Blackbirds whistle, Common Blackbird (turdus merula).jpg
Bonobos chirp, squeal, screech, shriek, squeak, hoot, Bonobo 0155.jpg
Calves bleat,
Camels grunt, 2011 Trampeltier 1528.JPG
Capuchins chirp, chatter, trill, Capuchin Costa Rica.jpg
Cats mew, purr, meow, miaow, hiss, yowl, screech, caterwaul, Cat poster 2.jpg
Chaffinch ow, Chaffinch (fringilla coelebs) m.jpg
Chickens cluck, cackle, bock, chirp, crow, screech, peep, cockadoodledoo, Female pair.jpg
Chimpanzees pant-hoot, grunt, scream, chatter, screech, bark, Pan troglodytes (male).jpg
Chinchillas squeak, Standardchinchilla.jpg
Cicadas chirp, Tibicen linnei.jpg
Cows moo, low, bawl (calf), bellow, CH cow 2.jpg
Coyotes yelp, cry, snarl, 2009-Coyote-Yosemite.jpg
Crickets chirp, creak,
Crows caw, cah, Corvus-brachyrhynchos-001.jpg
Cuckoos coo, cuckoo,
Curlews pipe, Curlew - natures pics.jpg
Deer bell,
Dingos bark, cry, Dingo walking.jpg
Dogs bark, woof, arf, bay, bow-wow, howl, yap, YellowLabradorLooking new.jpg
Dolphins click, Bottlenose Dolphin KSC04pd0178.jpg
Donkeys bray, hee-haw, Donkey 1 arp 750px.jpg
Doves coo-coo, Rock dove - natures pics.jpg
Ducks quack, Bucephala-albeola-010.jpg
Eagles scream,  
Elephants trumpet, roar, moan, rumble,
Emus drum, Emu-wild.jpg
Falcons chant, Brown-Falcon,-Vic,-3.1.2008.jpg
Ferrets dook, Ferret 2008.png
Flies buzz, hum, Diptera1.jpg
Foxes bark, yelp, simper, Fuzzy Freddy.jpg
Frogs croak, ribbit, gribbit, Caerulea3 crop.jpg
Geese cackle, gobble, hiss, honk, quack,
Gibbons whoop, chirp, screech, wail, Hylobates lar pair of white and black 01.jpg
Giraffes bleat,
Goats bleat, baa, Hausziege 04.jpg
Gorillas hoot, bark, grunt, whine, pock, pant, Male gorilla in SF zoo.jpg
Grasshoppers chirp, Young grasshopper on grass stalk02.jpg
Guinea pigs squeak, Two adult Guinea Pigs (Cavia porcellus).jpg
Hamsters squeak, Syrian hamster filling his cheek pouches with Dandelion leaves.JPG
Hares squeak, Hare.jpg
Hens cackle, cluck Female pair.jpg
Hermit crabs chirp,
Hippopotamuses bellow, rumble, roar, growl, Hippopotamus - 04.jpg
Hogs grunt, snort, Female pair.jpg
Horses neigh, snort, whinny, nicker, sputter, Nokota Horses cropped.jpg
Humans whisper, hum, whistle, cry, scream, sing, talk, moan, laugh, sputter, mimic other animals, coo, Akha cropped hires.JPG
Hummingbirds hum, twitter, Archilochus-alexandri-002-edit.jpg
Hyenas laugh, scream, whoop,
Jackals gecker, howl, Jackal Cape cross 2009.JPG
Jays chatter, screech, Garrulus glandarius 1 Luc Viatour.jpg
Kangaroos chortle,
Koalas scream, bellow, wail, Koala climbing tree.jpg
Komodo dragons growl, snarl, hiss, Komodo dragon with tongue.jpg
Lambs bleat, baa, Flock of sheep.jpg
Larks sing, warble, Alauda arvensis 2.jpg
Linnets chuckle, Carduelis cannabina -England -male-8.jpg
Lions roar, growl, Lion waiting in Namibia.jpg
Llamas maw, Llama lying down.jpg
Magpies chatter,
Mice squeak and squeal, Мышь 2.jpg
Monkeys chatter, gecker, gibber, whoop, screech,
Moose bellow, Moose superior.jpg
Mosquitoes whine, Mosquito 2007-2.jpg
Narwhals squeal,
Nightingales pipe, sing, warble, Nachtigall (Luscinia megarhynchos)-2.jpg
Okapis cough, bellow, Okapia johnstoni -Marwell Wildlife, Hampshire, England-8a.jpg
Orangutans Groan, grunt, smooch, wheeze, chirp, squeal, sputter, Orang Utan, Semenggok Forest Reserve, Sarawak, Borneo, Malaysia.JPG
Ostriches chirp, bark, hiss, low hum, Ostriches cape point cropped 2.jpg
Owls hoot, scream, screech, shriek Athene noctua (cropped).jpg
Oxen bellow, low,
Parrots mimic a variety of sounds, screech, squawk,
Peacocks scream, Paonroue.JPG
Peafowls scream,
Pigs snort, grunt, squeal, oink, Sow with piglet.jpg
Pigeons coo, Rock dove - natures pics.jpg
Porpoises whistle, click Harbor.Porpoise.4.jpg
Prairie dogs bark,
Puffins chirp, Puffin002.jpg
Queleas chatter,
Rabbits squeak, drum, growl (when cornered) Rabbit in montana.jpg
Raccoons trill, Raccoon climbing in tree - Cropped and color corrected.jpg
Rats squeak, eek, brux, Rattus norvegicus 1.jpg
Ravens croak,
Rhinoceros bellow, Diceros bicornis.jpg
Robins chirp, Rouge gorge familier - crop (WB correction).jpg
Rooks caw, Corvus frugilegus -Dartmoor, Devon, England-8.jpg
Roosters crow,
Seagulls scream, squawk, mew Seagull in flight by Jiyang Chen.jpg
Seals bark, Pinniped collage.png
Sheep bleat, baa,
Snakes hiss, Coast Garter Snake.jpg
Sparrows chirp, twitter, House Sparrow mar08.jpg
Squirrels squeak, chatter, click,
Stags bellow, Red deer stag 2009 denmark.jpg
Swallows twitter, squeal, Red-rumpedSwallow01.jpg
Swans cry, Cygnus olor 2 (Marek Szczepanek).jpg
Tapirs whistle, squeak, Tapirus terrestris.jpg
Tigers growl, roar, snarl, Tiger in the water.jpg
Thrushes whistle, sing, American Robin 0025.jpg
Tokay Geckos croak, Tokay.jpg
Turkeys gobble, 2006-ca-turkey.jpg
Vervets chirp, chatter, grunt, bark, coo, sputter,
Vultures scream, Eagle beak sideview A.jpg
Walruses groan, Noaa-walrus22.jpg
Whales sing, Eubalaena glacialis with calf.jpg
Wolves howl, cry, yell, Wolf, voor de natuur, Saxifraga - Jan Nijendijk.5097.jpg
Wrens trill, warble, Cistothorus palustris Iona.jpg
Yaks low, moan, Bos grunniens at Letdar on Annapurna Circuit.jpg
Zebras whinny, whoop,

Note : The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view of the subject says Wikipedia

Courtesy and Source : Wikipedia

Earth Our Home Too : Demoiselle Cranes

The Demoiselle Crane (Anthropoides virgo) is a species of crane found in central Eurasia, ranging from the Black Sea to Mongolia and North Eastern China. There is also a small breeding population in Turkey. These cranes are migratory birds. Birds from western Eurasia will spend the winter in Africa whilst the birds from Asia, Mongolia and China will spend the winter in the Indian subcontinent. The bird is symbolically significant in the culture of North India, where it is known as the koonj.

A_group_of_Demoisille_cranes

Khichan is a village in the Jodhpur district of the Indian state of Rajasthan that in recent years has established a tradition of feeding wild birds, including Demoiselle Cranes that winter here every year. Up to 3,000 kilograms (6,600 lb) of bird seed are consumed every day by the feeding birds. Khichan village now hosts over 20,000 Demoiselle Cranes from as early as August each year to as late as March of the following year. The village, which has become popular among bird watchers, achieved international recognition when it was featured in Birding World magazine in an article titled, “Khichan – the Demoiselle Crane village.”

A director of the International Crane Foundation has visited Khichan. This foundation is also supporting the efforts of Marwar Crane Foundation in feeding the cranes.

Characteristics

The Demoiselle is 85–100 cm (34–39 in) long, 76 cm (30 in) tall and has a 155–180 cm (61–71 in) wingspan. It weighs 2–3 kg (4.4–6.6 lbs). It is the smallest species of crane. The Demoiselle Crane is slightly smaller than the Common Crane but has similar plumage. It has a long white neck stripe and the black on the foreneck extends down over the chest in a plume.

It has a loud trumpeting call, higher-pitched than the Common Crane. Like other cranes it has a dancing display, more balletic than the Common Crane, with less leaping.

Life

The Demoiselle Crane lives in a variety of different environments, including desert areas and numerous types of grasslands (flooded, mountain, temperate and tropical grassland) which are often within a few hundred metres of streams or lakes. However, when nesting, they prefer patchy areas of vegetation which is tall enough to conceal them and their nests, yet short enough to allow them look out for predators whilst incubating their eggs.

Demoiselle Cranes have to take one of the toughest migrations in the world. In late August through September, they gather in flocks of up to 400 individuals and prepare for their flight to their winter range. During their migratory flight south, Demoiselles fly like all cranes, with their head and neck straight forward and their feet and legs straight behind, reaching altitudes of 16,000-26,000 feet (4,875-7,925 m). Along their arduous journey they have to cross the Himalayan mountains to get to their over-wintering grounds in India. Many die from fatigue, hunger and predation from Golden Eagles. Simpler, lower routes are possible, such as crossing the range via the Khyber Pass. However, their presently preferred route has been hard-wired by countless cycles of migration. At their wintering grounds, Demoiselles have been observed flocking with Common Cranes, their combined totals reaching up to 20,000 individuals. Demoiselles maintain separate social groups within the larger flock. In March and April, they begin their long spring journey back to their northern nesting grounds.


Courtesy : Wikipedia

Earth Our Home Too : Snow Leopards

You must know this marvelous cat’s name which “Mac OS X” also carries. The Snow Leopard (Panthera uncia) is a large cat native to the mountain ranges of Central and South Asia. It is listed as endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species because as of 2003, the size of the global population was estimated at 4,080-6,590 adults, of which fewer than 2,500 individuals may reproduce in the wild.

Unusually among cats, snow leopards also eat a significant amount of vegetation, including grass and twigs.

The snow leopard is the National Heritage Animal of Pakistan. The snow leopard is distributed from the west of Lake Baikal through southern Siberia, in the Kunlun Mountains, in the Russian Altai mountainsSayan and Tannu-Ola Mountains, in the Tian Shan, across KazakhstanKyrgyzstanTajikistan, and Uzbekistan to the Hindu Kush in eastern AfghanistanKarakoram in northern Pakistan, in the Pamir Mountains, and in the high altitudes of the Himalayas in IndiaNepal, and Bhutan, and the Tibetan Plateau. In Mongolia, it is found in the Mongolian and Gobi Altai and the Khangai Mountains. In Tibet, it is found up to the Altyn-Tagh in the north.

The snow leopard cannot roar, despite possessing partial ossification of the hyoid bone. This partial ossification was previously thought to be essential for allowing the big cats to roar, but new studies show the ability to roar is due to other morphological features, especially of the larynx, which are absent in the snow leopard. Snow leopard vocalizations include hisses,chuffing, mews, growls, and wailing.

File:Snow leopard portrait.jpg

Snow leopards are slightly smaller than the other big cats but, like them, exhibit a range of sizes, generally weighing between 27 and 55 kg (60 and 121 lb), with an occasional large male reaching 75 kg (165 lb) and small female of under 25 kg (55 lb).They have a relatively short body, measuring in length from the head to the base of the tail 75 to 130 cm (30 to 50 in). However, the tail is quite long, at 80 to 100 cm (31 to 39 in), with only the domestic-cat-sized marbled cat being relatively longer-tailed. They are stocky and short-legged big cats, standing about 60 cm (24 in) at the shoulder.

Snow leopards have long, thick fur, and their base color varies from smoky gray to yellowish tan, with whitish underparts. They have dark grey to black open rosettes on their bodies, with small spots of the same color on their heads and larger spots on their legs and tails. Unusually among cats, their eyes are pale green or grey in color.

File:Schneeleopard P1040242.jpg

Snow leopards show several adaptations for living in a cold, mountainous environment. Their bodies are stocky, their fur is thick, and their ears are small and rounded, all of which help to minimize heat loss. Their paws are wide, which distributes their weight better for walking on snow, and have fur on their undersides to increase their grip on steep and unstable surfaces; it also helps to minimize heat loss. Snow leopards’ tails are long and flexible, helping them to maintain their balance, which is very important in the rocky terrain they inhabit. Their tails are also very thick due to storage of fat and are very thickly covered with fur which allows them to be used like a blanket to protect their faces when asleep.

File:Léopard des neiges 14081.jpg File:Uncia uncia.jpg

The snow leopard is solitary, except for females with cubs. They rear them in dens in the mountains for extended periods. Snow leopards are carnivores and actively hunt their prey. Like many cats, they are also opportunistic feeders, eating whatever meat they can find, including carrion and domestic livestock. They can kill animals more than three to four times their own weight, such as the bharalHimalayan tahrmarkhor and argali, but will readily take much smaller prey, such as hares and birds. They are capable of killing most animals in their range with the probable exception of the adult male yak

File:Lightmatter snowleopard.jpg

Litter sizes vary from one to five cubs, but the average is 2.2. The cubs are blind and helpless at birth, although already with a thick coat of fur, and weigh from 320 to 567 g (11.3 to 20.0 oz). Their eyes open at around seven days, and the cubs can walk at five weeks and are fully weaned by 10 weeks. The cubs leave the den when they are around two to four months of age, but remain with their mother until they become independent after around 18–22 months. 

File:SnowCubs01.jpg

Range Country Habitat Area
(km2)
Estimated
Population
Afghanistan 50,000 100–200?
Bhutan 15,000 100–200?
China 1,100,000 2,000–2,500
India 75,000 200–600
Kazakhstan 50,000 180–200
Kyrgyzstan 105,000 150–500
Mongolia 101,000 500–1,000
Nepal 30,000 300–500
Pakistan 80,000 200–420
Tajikistan 100,000 180–220
Uzbekistan 10,000 20–50

There are also approximately 600 snow leopards in zoos around the world.


Courtesy : Wikipedia

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