Good vs Evil: Good Samaritan Teens / Teen Rapists

Good vs Evil: What prevails more in our society? Good or Evil? We leave the choice to you to evaluate the society you belong to. However in this new section ‘Good vs Evil’ we bring out the two extremes of the social incidents. The good one which sets an example and ensure we raise our kids like them. And the evil one which makes us aware and ensure we raise our kids unlike them and enable them to protect themselves from such evils.

The Good: Good Samaritan Teens

billy-tarbett-age-15-left-bailey-campbell-17-middle-and-aeron-mcquillin-18

Tarbett (17),  Bailey Campbell (17) and Aeron McQuillin (18)

The three teenagers from Ontario, Canada, went for a drive and spotted a stranger’s broken car. She was struggling with no help at the highway, who can’t afford to tow the vehicle. The boys decided to help her by pushing her car till her home. Interestingly, her home is not at the next street, but 7 miles far. But the good Samaritans did it. (Read the full story here)

The Evil : Teen Rapists

Rape-accused

In India, rape has become a routine crime and going on like it has no full stop. According to a report about 1,752 rape incidents are reported every year in the Indian state of Odisha, alone. But it saddens us, when the crime is committed by teenagers whom we can still call as boys next door.  A college student was allegedly gang-raped in Odisha’s Sundargarh by five youth, including three of her classmates, who dragged her into a forest on her way back to home after college. (Read the full story here)

Bottom line: Every kid is born with a blank soul, it is us the society and the parents who script their character. Teach them Good and make them practice it. Make them aware of the Evil and help them fight it.

 

Comment your thoughts… Ideas to bring up good character in kids.

News Courtesy: CBC.ca and News 18 India

Documentary : Know : Canada

Canada is a country in the northern part of North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering 9.98 million square kilometres (3.85 million square miles), making it the world’s second-largest country by total area. Canada’s southern border with the United States, stretching some 8,891 kilometres (5,525 mi), is the world’s longest bi-national land border. Its capital is Ottawa, and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver. As a whole, Canada is sparsely populated, the majority of its land area being dominated by forest and tundra. Consequently, its population is highly urbanized, with over 80 percent of its inhabitants concentrated in large and medium-sized cities, with 70% of citizens residing within 100 kilometres (62 mi) of the southern border. Canada’s climate varies widely across its vast area, ranging from arctic weather in the north, to hot summers in the southern regions, with four distinct seasons.

Know : Top 60 Green Economy Countries

This 4th edition of the GGEI is an in-depth look at how 60 countries perform in the global green economy, as well as how expert practitioners rank this performance and ranks based on perception.

Global Green Economy Index

Performance Rank

SCORE

1 Sweden 68.1
2 Norway 65.9
3 Costa Rica 64.2
4 Germany 63.6
5 Denmark 63.2
6 Switzerland 63.1
7 Austria 63
8 Finland 62.9
9 Iceland 62.6
10 Spain 59.2
11 Ireland 59
12 New Zealand 58.8
13 France 56.4
14 Colombia 56.1
15 Portugal 55.8
16 Peru 55.8
17 Kenya 55.4
18 Brazil 55.3
19 Chile 55.1
20 United Kingdom 54.6
21 Netherlands 54.2
22 Uruguay 54.1
23 Mauritius 51.5
24 Zambia 51.3
25 Italy 51.2
26 Ethiopia 50.6
27 Rwanda 50.4
28 United States 50.1
29 Canada 49.6
30 Taiwan 47.5
31 Mexico 47.4
32 Philippines 47.2
33 Israel 47
34 South Africa 46.8
35 Malaysia 46.4
36 Tanzania 46.2
37 Australia 46.1
38 Czech Republic 46
39 South Korea 45.6
40 United Arab Emirates 45.6
41 Burkina Faso 45.2
42 Cambodia 44.9
43 Turkey 44.8
44 Japan 44.6
45 Thailand 44.5
46 Ghana 44.5
47 Belgium 44.1
48 Argentina 43.8
49 India 43.4
50 Slovakia 43
51 Panama 41.5
52 Morocco 41.5
53 Mozambique 41
54 Indonesia 40.3
55 China 40.1
56 Poland 37.1
57 Senegal 33.4
58 Qatar 33.3
59 Vietnam 32.2
60 Mongolia 29.5

India Green Rank

Climate Change Performance

The perception survey for the 2014 GGEI was conducted from June through August 2014, and polled targeted respondents on how they assessed national green performance on the four main dimensions of Leadership & Climate Change, Efficiency Sectors, Markets & Investment, and Environment & Natural Capital.

Perception Rank

SCORE

1 Germany 93.6
2 Denmark 92.8
3 Sweden 90.2
4 Norway 84.8
5 Netherlands 84
6 United States 76.2
7 Japan 72.4
8 United Kingdom 71.6
9 Finland 70.2
10 Switzerland 67.8
11 Australia 66.3
12 Canada 63
13 China 61.6
14 Costa Rica 60.4
15 Brazil 59.7
16 India 56.1
17 Austria 55.1
18 New Zealand 52
19 Iceland 49.1
20 France 48.5
21 Spain 46.7
22 South Africa 45.8
23 South Korea 44.1
24 Israel 41.1
25 United Arab Emirates 40.3
26 Kenya 40
27 Malaysia 39.3
28 Mexico 37.1
29 Italy 36.1
30 Belgium 36
31 Indonesia 35.3
32 Peru 35
33 Ireland 34.3
34 Mauritius 34
35 Chile 33.5
36 Tanzania 33.3
37 Ethiopia 33.1
38 Philippines 33
39 Morocco 32.6
40 Portugal 32.5
41 Colombia 31.6
42 Poland 31.5
43 Qatar 31.2
44 Turkey 31.2
45 Vietnam 31.1
46 Taiwan 30.7
47 Argentina 30.2
48 Rwanda 30.1
49 Zambia 30
50 Mozambique 29.8
51 Thailand 29.3
52 Czech Republic 29.2
53 Cambodia 28.9
54 Ghana 28.7
55 Burkina Faso 28.5
56 Slovakia 28.2
57 Mongolia 27.7
58 Uruguay 27.6
59 Panama 27.4
60 Senegal 27.3

Germany (perception) and Sweden (performance) top the 2014 GGEI, confirming a trend observed in prior editions of strong results by Germany and the Nordic states. Besides performing well on both the economic and environmental areas of the GGEI, these nations display consistent green leadership and receive global recognition for it.

Covered for the first time in this edition, Costa Rica performs extremely well, ranking third on the GGEI performance measure behind Sweden and Norway and receiving strong recognition on the perception survey, an impressive result for such a small country.

Like in 2012, Copenhagen is the top green city as ranked by our survey of global experts, reinforcing the continued strength of the Danish green brand. Tracked for the first time this year, Vancouver and Singapore also rank in the top 10 of green cities.

Many of the fastest growing economies in the world rank poorly on the GGEI performance measure, highlighting an urgent need to reorient their economies to greener

growth pathways. Regionally, these countries are mostly in Africa (Ghana), the Gulf (Qatar, United Arab Emirates), and Asia (Cambodia, China, Thailand, Vietnam)

There are concerning results related to more developed countries as well – notably Australia, Japan, the Netherlands and the United States – where perceptions of their green economic performance dramatically exceed their actual performance on the GGEI. These countries appear to receive more credit than they deserve, an information gap that requires further exploration.

Despite its leadership founding the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI), South Korea continues not to register as a green country brand on our survey and performs poorly, ranked 39th out of 60 on this year’s GGEI. Despite better perception results, Japan also performs poorly on the 2014 GGEI, ranked 44th out of 60.

While the United Kingdom performs adequately in most areas of the GGEI, it doesn’t excel on any one topic, possibly due to inconsistent political rhetoric and policy related to green economy there. While gradually improving in each successive GGEI edition, the UK still lags behind its northern European and Nordic competitors.

Five European nations – Austria, Iceland, Ireland, Portugal and Spain – reveal performance scores that exceed their perception ones significantly – signaling an urgent need for better strategic communications and information exchange of their green merits and associated investment opportunities.

The GGEI results reveal a similar observation for a variety of non-European states – including Ethiopia, Mauritius, Rwanda in Africa and Colombia, Chile and Peru in Latin America – again suggesting a need for these states to better position their green economies on the international stage.


Courtesy and Source : GGEI-Report 2014 by DUAL CITIZEN LLC

Disclaimer: All the rights of the data and the study belong to DUAL CITIZEN LLC. We have shared the info here for educational purposes only. We do not own any info above or the rights.


Know : List of Countries using Nuclear Energy

Nuclear_power_station

Nuclear_label

Nuclear power stations operate in 31 countries. Of the thirty countries in which nuclear power plants operate, only France, Belgium, Hungary and Slovakia use them as the primary source of electricity, although many other countries have a significant nuclear power generation capacity. According to the World Nuclear Association, a nuclear power advocacy group, over 45 countries are giving “serious consideration” to introducing a nuclear power capability, with Iran, the United Arab Emirates, Turkey,Vietnam, Belarus, and Jordan at the forefront. China, South Korea and India are pursuing ambitious expansions of their nuclear power capacities

As of June 2011, Germany and Switzerland are phasing-out nuclear power which will be replaced mostly by fossil fuels, and a smaller part renewable energy.

Rank Country Capacity (MW)
(2014)
Nuclear share of
electricity production, 2013
1 United States United States 99,081 19.4%
2 France France 63,130 73.3%
3 Japan Japan 42,388 1.7%
4 Russia Russia 23,643 17.5%
5 South Korea South Korea 20,721 27.6%
6 China China 17,978 2.1%
7 Canada Canada 13,538 16.0%
8 Ukraine Ukraine 13,107 43.6%
9 Germany Germany 12,068 15.4%
10 Sweden Sweden 9,474 42.7%
11 United Kingdom United Kingdom 9,243 18.3%
12 Spain Spain 7,121 19.7%
13 Belgium Belgium 5,927 52.1%
14 India India 5,308 3.5%
15 Taiwan Taiwan 5,032 19.1%
16 Czech Republic Czech Republic 3,884 35.9%
17 Switzerland Switzerland 3,308 36.4%
18 Finland Finland 2,752 33.3%
19 Bulgaria Bulgaria 1,906 30.7%
20 Hungary Hungary 1,889 50.7%
21 Brazil Brazil 1,884 2.8%
22 South Africa South Africa 1,860 5.7%
23 Slovakia Slovakia 1,815 51.7%
24 Argentina Argentina 1,627 4.4%
25 Mexico Mexico 1,570 4.6%
26 Romania Romania 1,300 19.8%
27 Iran Iran 915 1.5%
28 Pakistan Pakistan 690 4.4%
29 Slovenia Slovenia 688 33.6%
30 Netherlands Netherlands 482 2.8%
31 Armenia Armenia 375 29.2%
World 374,704

Courtesy & Source: “Nuclear power station” by Ichabod Paleogene, Krzysztof Kori. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

Eco Preservation : The Spotted Lake, Kliluk

Spotted Lake is a saline endorheic alkali lake located northwest of Osoyoos in the eastern Similkameen Valley of British Columbia, Canada.

Kliluk Lake (11)

Spotted Lake is richly concentrated with various minerals. It contains dense deposits of magnesium sulfate, calcium and sodium sulphates. It also contains high concentrations of eight other minerals and lower amounts of silver and titanium.

Kliluk Lake

Most of the water in the lake evaporates over the summer, revealing colorful mineral deposits. Large “spots” on the lake appear and are colored according to the mineral composition and seasonal amount of precipitation. Magnesium sulfate, which crystallizes in the summer, is a major contributor to spot color. In the summer, remaining minerals in the lake harden to form natural “walkways” around and between the spots.

Kliluk Lake (9)

Originally known to the First Nations of the Okanagan Valley as Kliluk, Spotted Lake was for centuries and remains revered as a sacred site thought to provide therapeutic waters. During World War I, the minerals of Spotted Lake were used in manufacturing ammunition.

Kliluk Lake (3)

Later, the area came under the control of the Ernest Smith Family for a term of about 40 years. In 1979, Smith attempted to create interest in a spa at the lake. The First Nations responded with an effort to buy the lake, then in October 2001, struck a deal by purchasing 22 hectares of land for a total of $720,000, and contributed about 20% of the cost. The Indian Affairs Department paid the remainder.

Kliluk Lake (7)

Today, there is a roadside sign telling visitors about the lake’s mythical healing powers. Despite a fence protecting the lake shore from the liabilities of public access, the lake can be easily seen and many visitors stop to view the site.

Kliluk Lake (10) Kliluk Lake (4) Kliluk Lake (5) Kliluk Lake (1)


Courtesy & Source : Wikipedia