“Meh! World Environment Day” : 100 simple things

earth-vs-man

 

Our Actions speak more than words. Earth Day, Nature Day, World Environment Day, Rivers Day… There are numerous days (Click here to check the complete list of Days :List of International Days by UN But what is the change that happens within us as an individual. Wearing a T-Shirt or Thinking about Earth on this Day alone is not enough and will not save it.

At least Do one good thing in our daily activities for conserving the Environment!

Here are some 100 Ideas but there are many good habits that we can practise to save the environment! Let’s Do the Doing than just Talking!

In your home—conserve energy

1. Clean or replace air filters on your air conditioning unit at least once a month.
2. If you have central air conditioning, do not close vents in unused rooms.
3. Lower the thermostat on your water heater to 120°.
4. Wrap your water heater in an insulated blanket.
5. Turn down or shut off your water heater when you will be away for extended periods.
6. Turn off unneeded lights even when leaving a room for a short time.
7. Set your refrigerator temperature at 36° to 38° and your freezer at 0° to 5°.
8. When using an oven, minimize door opening while it is in use; it reduces oven temperature by 25° to 30° every time you open the door.
9. Clean the lint filter in your dryer after every load so that it uses less energy.
10. Unplug seldom used appliances.
11. Use a microwave whenever you can instead of a conventional oven or stove.
12. Wash clothes with warm or cold water instead of hot.
13. Reverse your indoor ceiling fans for summer and winter operations as recommended.
14. Turn off lights, computers and other appliances when not in use.
15. Purchase appliances and office equipment with the Energy Star label; old refrigerators, for example, use up to 50% more electricity than newer models.
16. Only use electric appliances when you need them.
17. Use compact fluorescent light bulbs to save money and energy.
18. Keep your thermostat at 68° in winter and 78° in summer.
19. Keep your thermostat higher in summer and lower in winter when you are away from home.
20. Insulate your home as best as you can.
21. Install weather stripping around all doors and windows.
22. Shut off electrical equipment in the evening when you leave work.
23. Plant trees to shade your home.
24. Shade outside air conditioning units by trees or other means.
25. Replace old windows with energy efficient ones.
26. Use cold water instead of warm or hot water when possible.
27. Connect your outdoor lights to a timer.
28. Buy green electricity – electricity produced by low – or even zero-pollution facilities

In your home—reduce toxicity

29. Eliminate mercury from your home by purchasing items without mercury, and dispose of items containing mercury at an appropriate drop-off facility when necessary (e.g., old thermometers).
30. Learn about alternatives to household cleaning items that do not use hazardous chemicals.
31. Buy the right amount of paint for the job.
32. Review labels of household cleaners you use. Consider alternatives like baking soda, scouring pads, water or
a little more elbow grease.
33. When no good alternatives exist to a toxic item, find the least amount required for an effective, sanitary result.
34. If you have an older home, have paint in your home tested for lead. If you have lead-based paint, cover it with
wall paper or other material instead of sanding it or burning it off.
35. Use traps instead of rat and mouse poisons and insect killers.
36. Have your home tested for radon.
37. Use cedar chips or aromatic herbs instead of mothballs.

In your yard

38. Avoid using leaf blowers and other dust-producing equipment.
39. Use an electric lawn-mower instead of a gas-powered one.
40. Leave grass clippings on the yard—they decompose and return nutrients to the soil.
41. Use recycled wood chips as mulch to keep weeds down, retain moisture and prevent erosion.
42. Use only the required amount of fertilizer.
43. Minimize pesticide use.
44. Create a wildlife habitat in your yard.
45. Water grass early in the morning.
46. Rent or borrow items like ladders, chain saws, party decorations and others that are seldom used.
47. Take actions that use non hazardous components (e.g., to ward off pests, plant marigolds in a garden instead of using pesticide).
48. Put leaves in a compost heap instead of burning them or throwing them away. Yard debris too large for your
compost bin should be taken to a yard-debris recycler.

In your office

49. Copy and print on both sides of paper.
50. Reuse items like envelopes, folders and paper clips.
51. Use mailer sheets for interoffice mail instead of an envelope.
52. Set up a bulletin board for memos instead of sending a copy to each employee.
53. Use e-mail instead of paper correspondence.
54. Use recycled paper.
55. Use discarded paper for scrap paper.
56. Encourage your school and/or company to print documents with soy-based inks, which are less toxic.
57. Use a ceramic coffee mug instead of a disposable cup.

Ways you can protect our air

58. Ask your employer to consider flexible work schedules or telecommuting.
59. Recycle printer cartridges.
60. Shut off electrical equipment in the evening when you leave work.
61. Report smoking vehicles to your local air agency.
62. Don’t use your wood stove or fireplace when air quality is poor.
63. Avoid slow-burning, smoldering fires. They produce the largest amount of pollution.
64. Burn seasoned wood – it burns cleaner than green wood.
65. Use solar power for home and water heating.
66. Use low-VOC or water-based paints, stains, finishes and paint strippers.
67. Purchase radial tires and keep them properly inflated for your vehicle.
68. Paint with brushes or rollers instead of using spray paints to minimize harmful emissions.
69. Ignite charcoal barbecues with an electric probe or other alternative to lighter fluid.
70. If you use a wood stove, use one sold after 1990. They are required to meet federal emissions standards and are more efficient and cleaner burning.
71. Walk or ride your bike instead of driving, whenever possible.
72. Join a carpool or vanpool to get to work. Ways to use less water
73. Check and fix any water leaks.
74. Install water-saving devices on your faucets and toilets.
75. Don’t wash dishes with the water running continuously.
76. Wash and dry only full loads of laundry and dishes.
77. Follow your community’s water use restrictions or guidelines.
78. Install a low-flow shower head.
79. Replace old toilets with new ones that use a lot less water.
80. Turn off washing machine’s water supply to prevent leaks.

Ways to protect our water

81. Revegetate or mulch disturbed soil as soon as possible.
82. Never dump anything down a storm drain.
83. Have your septic tank pumped and system inspected regularly.
84. Check your car for oil or other leaks, and recycle motor oil.
85. Take your car to a car wash instead of washing it in the driveway.
86. Learn about your watershed. Create less trash
87. Buy items in bulk from loose bins when possible to reduce the packaging wasted.
88. Avoid products with several layers of packaging when only one is sufficient. About 33% of what we throw away is packaging.
89. Buy products that you can reuse.
90. Maintain and repair durable products instead of buying new ones.
91. Check reports for products that are easily repaired and have low breakdown rates.
92. Reuse items like bags and containers when possible.
93. Use cloth napkins instead of paper ones.
94. Use reusable plates and utensils instead of disposable ones.
95. Use reusable containers to store food instead of aluminum foil and cling wrap.
96. Shop with a canvas bag instead of using paper and plastic bags.
97. Buy rechargeable batteries for devices used frequently.
98. Reuse packaging cartons and shipping materials. Old newspapers make great packaging material.
99. Compost your vegetable scraps.
100. Buy used furniture – there is a surplus of it, and it is much cheaper than new furniture.


Information Courtesy : Wright.Edu

Know : Ranking of Countries : Where to be Born?

The index was calculated for 2013 and includes data from 80 countries and territories. The survey used ten quality of life factors along with forecasts of future GDP per capita to determine a nation’s score.

A Comparison from 1988 to 2013

Where to be born Rankings 2013

Rank Country or territory Score
(out of 10)
1   Switzerland 8.22
2  Australia 8.12
3  Norway 8.09
4  Sweden 8.02
5  Denmark 8.01
6  Singapore 8.00
7  New Zealand 7.95
8  Netherlands 7.94
9  Canada 7.81
10  Hong Kong 7.80
11  Finland 7.76
12  Ireland 7.74
13  Austria 7.73
14  Taiwan 7.67
15  Belgium 7.51
16  Germany 7.38
16  United States 7.38
18  United Arab Emirates 7.33
19  South Korea 7.25
20  Israel 7.23
21  Italy 7.21
22  Kuwait 7.18
23  Chile 7.10
24  Cyprus 7.10
25  Japan 7.08
26  France 7.04
27  United Kingdom 7.01
28  Czech Republic 6.96
28  Spain 6.96
30  Costa Rica 6.92
30  Portugal 6.92
32  Slovenia 6.77
33  Poland 6.66
34  Greece 6.65
35  Slovakia 6.64
36  Malaysia 6.62
37  Brazil 6.52
38  Saudi Arabia 6.49
39  Mexico 6.41
40  Argentina 6.39
40  Cuba 6.39
42  Colombia 6.27
43  Peru 6.24
44  Estonia 6.07
44  Venezuela 6.07
46  Croatia 6.06
46  Hungary 6.06
48  Latvia 6.01
49  China 5.99
50  Thailand 5.96
51  Turkey 5.95
52  Dominican Republic 5.93
53  South Africa 5.89
54  Algeria 5.86
54  Serbia 5.86
56  Romania 5.85
57  Lithuania 5.82
58  Iran 5.78
59  Tunisia 5.77
60  Egypt 5.76
61  Bulgaria 5.73
62  El Salvador 5.72
63=  Philippines 5.71
63  Sri Lanka 5.71
65  Ecuador 5.70
66  India 5.67
66  Morocco 5.67
68  Vietnam 5.64
69  Jordan 5.63
70  Azerbaijan 5.60
71  Indonesia 5.54
72  Russia 5.31
73  Syria 5.29
74  Kazakhstan 5.20
75  Pakistan 5.17
76  Angola 5.09
77  Bangladesh 5.07
78  Ukraine 4.98
79  Kenya 4.91
80  Nigeria 4.74

The Economist Intelligence Unit’s where-to-be-born index, (previously called the quality-of-life index) attempts to measure which country will provide the best opportunities for a healthy, safe and prosperous life in the years ahead. It is based on a method that links the results of subjective life-satisfaction surveys to the objective determinants of quality of life across countries along with a forward-looking element.

The independent variables in the estimating equa­tion include:  (2006)

  • Material wellbeing as measured by GDP per capita
  • Life expectancy at birth
  • The quality of family life based primarily on divorce rates
  • The state of political freedoms
  • Job security (measured by the unemployment rate)
  • Climate (measured by two variables: the average deviation of minimum and maximum monthly temperatures from 14 degrees Celsius; and the number of months in the year with less than 30mm rainfall)
  • Personal physical security ratings (based primarily on recorded homicide rates and ratings for risk from crime and terrorism)
  • Quality of community life (based on membership in so­cial organisations)
  • Governance (measured by ratings for corruption)
  • Gender equality (measured by the share of seats in parliament held by women).

Courtesy and Source : www.economist.com and Wikipedia

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Earth Our Home Too : List of endangered Animals in India

CRITICALLY ENDANGERED SPECIES

Birds

  1. White-bellied Heron (Ardea insignis)

  2. Great Indian Bustard (Ardeotis nigriceps)

  3. Forest Owlet (Athene blewitti)

  4. Baer’s Pochard (Aythya baeri)

  5. Spoon-billed Sandpiper (Eurynorhynchus pygmeus)

  6. Siberian Crane (Grus leucogeranus)

  7. White-rumped Vulture (Gyps bengalensis)

  8. Indian Vulture (Gyps indicus)

  9. Slender-billed Vulture (Gyps tenuirostris)

  10. Bengal Florican (Houbaropsis bengalensis)

  11. Himalayan Quail (Ophrysia superciliosa)

  12. Jerdon’s Courser (Rhinoptilus bitorquatus)

  13. Pink-headed Duck (Rhodonessa caryophyllacea)

  14. Red-headed Vulture (Sarcogyps calvus)

  15. Sociable Lapwing (Vanellus gregarius)

Fish

  1. Knifetooth sawfish (Anoxypristis cuspidata)

  2. Pondicherry shark (Carcharhinus hemiodon)

  3. Ganges shark (Glyphis gangeticus)

  4. Deccan labeo (Labeo potail)

  5. Largetooth sawfish (Pristis microdon)

  6. Longcomb sawfish (Pristis zijsron)

Reptiles and amphibians

  1. Northern river terrapin (Batagur baska)

  2. Red-crowned roofed turtle (Batagur kachuga)

  3. Leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea)

  4. Hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata)

  5. Ghats wart frog (Fejervarya murthii)

  6. Gharial (Gavialis gangeticus)

  7. Gundia Indian frog (Indirana gundia)

  8. Toad-skinned frog (Indirana phrynoderma)

  9. Charles Darwin’s frog (Ingerana charlesdarwini)

  10. Rao’s torrent frog (Micrixalus kottigeharensis)

  11. Amboli bush frog (Pseudophilautus amboli)

  12. White-spotted bush frog (Raorchestes chalazodes)

  13. Griet bush frog (Raorchestes griet)

  14. Munnar bush frog (Raorchestes munnarensis)

  15. Ponmudi bush frog (Raorchestes ponmudi)

  16. Sacred Grove bush frog (Raorchestes sanctisilvaticus)

  17. Shillong bubble-nest frog (Raorchestes shillongensis)

  18. Anaimalai flying frog (Rhacophorus pseudomalabaricus)

Mammals

  1. Namdapha flying squirrel (Biswamoyopterus biswasi)

  2. Himalayan wolf  (“Canis himalayensis“)

  3. Kashmir stag (Cervus canadensis hanglu)

  4. Elvira rat (Cremnomys elvira)

  5. Andaman shrew (Crocidura andamanensis)

  6. Jenkins’ shrew (Crocidura jenkinsi)

  7. Nicobar shrew (Crocidura nicobarica)

  8. Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis)

  9. Kondana soft-furred rat (Millardia kondana)

  10. Pygmy hog (Porcula salvania)

  11. Javan rhinoceros (Rhinoceros sondaicus)

  12. Malabar large-spotted civet (Viverra civettina)

ENDANGERED

Fish

Birds

Mammals

Documentary : Know Iceland

click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Think of Iceland and there are several familiar associations: hip Reykjavík, the beautiful therapeutic Blue Lagoon, or perhaps our musical exports Björk or Sigur Rós. But this land of boiling mud pools, spurting geysers, glaciers and waterfalls is also an adventure playground. Its breathtaking landscape is an inspiration to artists and photographers. Iceland is the least densely populated country in Europe, with a pure, unpolluted and truly magical landscape. Iceland’s summers are surprisingly warm, lush and green, with the days lengthening until midsummer, when the sun dips down to the horizon but never sets. During winter you can marvel at the amazing, undulating green, blue, yellow and pink lights of the aurora in the night sky, and the winters are not as cold as you might imagine. Regardless of when you visit, you can be assured of the warmth of the Icelanders’ welcome and their desire to share their culture and make every effort to ensure that your stay is a pleasant one.

Iceland (IcelandicÍslandIPA: [ˈistlant]Lýðveldið Ísland) is a Nordic island country marking the juncture between the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans, on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The country has a population of 321,857 and a total area of 103,000 km2 (40,000 sq mi), which makes it the most sparsely populated country in Europe. The capital and largest city is Reykjavíkwith the surrounding areas in the southwestern region of the country being home to two-thirds of the country’s population. Reykjavík is the most northern capital in the world. Iceland is volcanically and geologically active. The interior consists mainly of a plateau characterised by sand and lava fields, mountains and glaciers, while many glacial rivers flow to the sea through the lowlands. Iceland is warmed by the Gulf Stream and has a temperate climate despite a high latitude just outside the Arctic Circle.

According to Landnámabók, the settlement of Iceland began in AD 874 when the chieftain Ingólfr Arnarson became the first permanent Norse settler on the island. Others had visited the island earlier and stayed over winter. During the following centuries, Norsemen settled Iceland, bringing with them thralls of Gaelic origin. From 1262 to 1918, Iceland was part of Norwegianthe and later the Danish monarchies. The country became independent in 1918 and a republic was declared in 1944.

Until the 20th century, the Icelanders relied largely on fishing and agriculture, and the country was one of the least developed in the region. Industrialisation of the fisheries and aid through the United States’ Marshall Plan following World War II brought prosperity and, by the 1990s, Iceland had developed as one of the wealthiest and most developed nations in the world. In 1994, Iceland became party to the European Economic Area, which supported diversification of the economy into economic and financial services.

Iceland has a free-market economy with relatively low corporate taxes compared to other OECD countries. It maintains Nordica social welfare system that provides universal health care and tertiary education for its citizens.  In 2013, it was ranked as the 13th most-developed country in the world by the United Nations’ Human Development Index.

In 2008, the nation’s entire banking system systemically failed, affected by the worldwide crisis. This resulted in political substantial unrest. In the wake of the crisis, Iceland instituted “capital controls” that made it impossible for many foreigners to get their money out of the country. Though designed to be temporary, the controls remain and are among the biggest hurdles for attracting international investment in the Icelandic economy. Iceland ranks high in economic and political stability, though it is still in the process of recovering from the crisis. Gender equality is highly valued in Iceland. In the Global Gender Gap Report 2012, Iceland holds the top spot for the least gap, closely followed by Finland, Norway and Sweden.

Icelandic culture is founded upon the nation’s Norse heritage. Most Icelanders are descendants of Norse and Gaelic settlers.Icelandic, a North Germanic language, is descended from Old Norse and is closely related to Faroese and some West Norwegian dialects. The country’s cultural heritage includes traditional Icelandic cuisinepoetry, and the medieval Icelanders’ sagas. Among NATO members, Iceland has the smallest population and is the only one with no standing army. Its lightly armed Coast Guard is in charge of its defenses.

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Courtesy  and Source : Youtube, Wikipedia and Discovery Channel.

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