Statistical Study : Poor Farmers & Dirty Indian Politics

India farmer kills himself at Delhi AAP rally

cartoon_politics_india2This is the most debated news on Indian media now! Maybe for this week, till we get another sensational news. Political parties are taking their respective pickings to do politics. Blaming one another and trying to follow their traditional strategy to make people fools. None of the political parties ever tried to resolve the agricultural issues on a serious move. So many projects are been dragged for political and business reasons. Meanwhile, farmers are continuing to commit suicide across the country. When the media covered a single farmer’s suicide on daylight, the politicians are ‘ullu banaving’ making fool of us.

Delhi BJP demands AAP Govt to give compensation of Rs 5 crore to farmer’s family – What about thousands of farmers who died without making a political impact as the farmer who committed suicide in Delhi recently? Our politicians are exposing themselves by making such statements and irresponsible blaming on each other.

Why no Indian Political party is focusing on the solution to end this? They are fighting over how to acquire lands from farmers by various laws to favours industries. Why no one is talking about Indian Rivers Inter-link project?

The Indian Rivers Inter-link is a proposed large-scale civil engineering project that aims to link India‘s rivers by a network of reservoirs and canals and so reduce persistent floods in some parts and water shortages in other parts of India. Which can address the causes of farmer suicides and also enrich the Environment of the whole country!

The raw truth is, projects like inter-linking rivers would unite the people of India together. Maybe while executing the project some politics may happen but once the project gets completed the whole nation will get the benefits of it. People will come together ahead of their regional and states differences. Which will revamp agriculture, India will become more of a Green Nation than an industrial nation. This of course, will prevent Industrialists to an extent and prevent politicians’ tie up with Industries and they cannot make easy money. That’s why such effective projects are kept on hold or progressing at snail pace!

As of 2013, a total of 296,438 farmers had killed themselves in India since 1995.[4] Most farm suicides have been linked to debt, a sharp rise in input costs, serious water crises, price volatility and crop failure due to pest attacks and disease. India is an agrarian country with around 60% of its people depending directly or indirectly upon agriculture. Farmer suicides account for 11.2% of all suicides in India.[1]

In Britain farmers are taking their own lives at a rate of one a week. ƒ In India, one farmer committed suicide every 32 minutes between 1997 and 2005. Read more from UN’s article here 

The following data is bit old, but shared here for analytical purpose.

Reasons for farm suicides.
(in 2002)[27]
Percent
(of suicides)
Habits like drinking, gambling, etc. 20.35
Failure of crops 16.81
Other reasons (e.g. chit fund) 15.04
Family problems with spouse, others 13.27
Chronic illness 9.73
Marriage of daughters 5.31
Political affiliation 4.42
Property disputes 2.65
Debt burden 2.65
Price crash 2.65
Borrowing too much (e.g. for house construction) 2.65
Losses in non-farm activities 1.77
Failure of bore well 0.88
Note: “Reasons were given by close relatives and friends. There are multiple reasons for suicides. Not even one case was given only one reason.”[27]

Indian Politicians must understand that people are no fools and we can read their minds so well! Instead of blaming one another, they must act upon solutions. Shame on them if they continue doing politics with Farmers and commoners of this country.


Courtesy and Sources : Source 1, Source 2, Source 3, Source 4

Know : Max Retail Price (MRP) Violations & Complaints : Numbers

YOU CAN COMPLAINT IF YOU NEED TO PAY MORE THAN MRP, Here are Contact Numbers…

MRPAll packaged goods in India, ranging from beverages to mobile phones to cosmetics, are stamped with a price dictated by the manufacturer as being the maximum allowable cost to the consumer.
Today’s version of MRP was adapted in December 1990. Previous to this date, manufacturer’s had the option of printing the price of their commodities in two ways:

  • ->Retail price Rs, local taxes extra
  • ->Maximum retail price Rs, inclusive of all taxes

Allegations from consumers and organizations that merchants were over-charging by adding additional local taxes on products brought about the change to MRP in 1990. Merchants were tacking on charges under the guise of local taxes when the actual rates were much lower. Consumers could pay one price for a product and a much higher or lower price in a neighboring town. Thus the change was made by the Ministry of Civil Supplies and its executive wing, the Department of Legal Metrology to the Standards of Weights & Measures Act (Packaged Commodities’ Rules). The change was meant to end complaints and confusion of over-charging to consumers for products. There have since been numerous complaints regarding this system of pricing with regards to under-charging of goods relative to MRP.

What does this mean for you?
In theory you should check the MRP on products before purchasing. Some merchants will charge less than the printed price at their discretion. If this happens to me, I make a mental note to return to that store in the future. On the opposite side, some merchants will try to charge more. If questioned, you may get a response that a newer stock has since come into their store with a revised MRP under which they are selling the old stock. While this is not allowable, there isn’t much you can do unless the merchant feels you aren’t willing to ease on the lower price. Another tactic to watch for is a merchant quoting you a price which he/she will then offer a discount on. Being giddy about the prospect of receiving a discount, you may not check the MRP until you’ve reached your destination. Unwrap your item to discover the MRP is actually less than the discounted price you paid.

What can you do to protect yourself?

  • Obtain full information regarding quality and price before making any purchases.
  • Be careful, about false and /or misleading advertisement.
  • Purchase only when you need and do not purchase in a hurry.
  • Do not buy blindly. Demand full information before you buy.
  • Do not compromise on the quality of goods and services and its quality. Purchase only quality products.
  • Ask for Bills always, bills that have enough proof that you can legally claim that you have made the purchase from that particular retailer.

You can file a complaint with the District Forum if you feel you have been over-charged. However, the opposing party has 30 days to file their version of events and can even extend this for an additional 15 day period. As a tourist you have very little recourse legally unless you are a long term traveler in one location.

Do keep one thing in mind. As of 2003, hotels are not subject to the MRP act. Packed goods purchased within a hotel can be sold at the property’s discretion.
Keep your eyes open and always check prices cause your travel budget only goes so far.

For Complaining in India…

S.No. Contact Details of the Concerned Department
1. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Andhra Pradesh,

No. 209, PWD Building,

Gandhi Nagar, Hyderabad,

Andhra Pradesh – 500 380

Ph: 040-27612170

Fax: 040-27613667

HYDERABAD – 500 030

2. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Andaman & Nicobar Island,

Port Blair – 744 101

Ph: 03192-232321

PORT BLAIR – 744 101

3. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Arunachal Pradesh,

Old Secretaraiat  Complex,

Nagarlagun –791110

Ph: 0360-2350837, 2248620, 2351150

Fax:0360-2350837

4. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Assam,

Ulubari,

Guwahati-781007

Ph: 0361-2470992

5. Office of Dept., of Agriculture

Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Bihar, Raja Bajar,

Beli Road,

Patna – 800 014

Ph: 0612-2286258

Fax 0612 -2224365:

6. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Chandigarh Administration,

Old Architect Building, West Wing,

Sector 19-B,

Chandigarh

Ph: 0172-2741341

Fax: 0172-741341,2741503

7. The Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Govt of Chattisgarh,

Raipur-492001 

Ph.0771-2524294/2343274/2343275

8. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Dadra &  Nagar Haveli Administration,

Silvasa – 396 230

Ph: 02639-242721

9. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Daman & Diu Administration,

Daman – 396 220

Ph: 02638-254685

10. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of India Delhi, NCT of Delhi,

117-118, C-Block, Vikas Bhavan,

N.Delhi – 110 002

Ph: 011-23379266, 23379262

Fax: 011- 23379267:

11. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Goa,

Panaji – 403 001

Ph: 0832-2426432

Fax:0832-2220218

12. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Gujarat,

Tolmap Bhavan, Opp. Sarang Pur Water Tank,

Ahmedabad, Gujarat – 380 002

Ph: 079-22114177

Fax: 079-22114234

AHMEDABAD – 380 002 

13. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Haryana,

Footwall chowk, Dist., industries center building ,

Ambala Cantt.

Ph: 0172-708581, 701366

14. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Himachal Pradesh,

Apurti Bhavan, 1st Floor,

Block No. 42, SDA Commercial Complex,

Kasumpti Shimla – 171 009

Ph: 0177-2625345

15 Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Jammu & Kashmir,

Revenue Complex Building,

Takkipora, Srinagar

Ph: 0194-473828

16. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Jammu & Kashmir,

Civil Sectt.

Block-I/16, Jammu

Ph: 0191-2549682

Fax:0191-2566188,2458693

17. Joint Agriculture Director cum

Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Govt of Jharkhand ,Lakshmi Nivas,

Krishi Bahvan, Kanke Road, Ranchi – 834006

0651 230923 (fax)

18. Sri Ramachandra

Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Karnataka,

No.1, Ali Askar Road,

P.B. No. 175, Bangalore, Karnataka – 560 052

Ph: 080-22253500  26682715 (Res)

Fax 080-22259024

BANGALORE-560052

19. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Kerala,

Vikas Bhavan,

Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala – 695 033

Ph: 0471-2303821    2310321  (Res)

Fax:0471-2305996

20. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Lakshdweep,

Kavaratti – 682 555

Ph: 04896-262112

Fax:04896- 263298

KAVARATTI – 682 555

21. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Madhya Pradesh,

Near Dak Bhavan,

Bhopal-Hoshangabad Road,

Bhopal – 462 011

Ph: 0755-2551017;

. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Maharashtra,

Government Barrack No. 7,

Free Press Journal Marg,

Mumbai – 400 021

Ph: 022-22023354

Fax: 022-22024950

23 Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Manipur,

2nd MR Gate, North ADC Lane,

Imphal – 795 001

Ph: 0385-311687,

24. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Meghalaya,

Shillong Temple Road,

Lower Lachuier,

Shillong – 793 001

Ph: 0364-222576

25. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Mizoram,

Aizawal

Ph: 0389-2322872, 2322572

Fax:0389-2321035

26. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Nagaland,

Kohima – 797 001

Ph: 0370-2221609

0370-2222862;    2221764(Res)

27. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Orissa,

Khandagiri,

Bhubneshwar – 751 003

Ph: 0674-4129967

Fax:0674-2402854

28. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Dy. Commissioner (Excise) and Ex-officio Under Secy.(Revenue)

Thattanchavady,

Pondicherry – 605 009

Ph: 0413-252493 (personal), 253462 (Off: with extension), 372523®

255196 (Res) Fax: 0413-253462

29. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Punjab,

17, Bays Building, Sector 17,

Chandigarh

0172-2701131

30. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Rajasthan,

Udyog Bhavan, Tilak Marg,

Jaipur – 300 001

Ph: 0141-380796, 380727

Telefax:380796

31

.

Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Sikkim,

Paljor Stadium, Paljor Stadium Road,

Gangatok – 737 101

Ph: 03592-202893;

32. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Tamil Nadu,

DMS Compound,

Teynampet, Chennai – 600 006

Ph: 044-24321 438

33 Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Tripura,

Tripura, Agartala

Ph: 0381-2325997;

34. The Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Govt of Uttaranchal, 15, Gandhi Road,

Dehradun –248001.

35. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Uttar Pradesh,

7, Walaquad Road, Lucknow – 1 (Uttar Pradesh)

Ph: 0522-2628063;

36. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of West Bengal,

45, Ganesh Chandra Avenue,

Calcutta – 700 013

Ph: 033-22364258,22256647,22520052

Courtesy : http://consumeraffairs.nic.inhttp://www.fullstopindia.com

Kudos! : An Indian Chief Minister says “No Thanks” to Perks!

kejriwalwa620_blog

Ever since independence, New Delhi’s leaders have commandeered the city’s most valuable real estate for themselves – living in the same bungalows behind the same walls left by British colonialists.

But on Monday, Arvind Kejriwal, Delhi’s new chief minister, vowed for the first time to break from India’s colonial past by promising that neither he nor his ministers would take up residence in those sumptuous homes.

He also promised to do away with a culture of privilege that allows ministers and top bureaucrats to zip through Delhi’s traffic in motorcades with police escorts and flashing lights.

In a letter dated Monday, a top Delhi police official wrote to Kejriwal’s private secretary that “Delhi police needs to give the security to him as per the norms,” and asked where the vast police detail should be sent.

In a handwritten response, Kejriwal wrote that he did not need security.

“God is my biggest security,” he wrote.

He did add, however, that he “would be grateful if some help is provided for crowd management or screening at a few places where I get mobbed.”

Kejriwal’s elevation to the chief minister of India’s capital city is among the most unlikely and meteoric rises to power in Indian history. At 45, he is Delhi’s youngest chief minister ever, replacing a woman 30 years his senior.

A former tax commissioner, Kejriwal gained national attention three years ago as the top adviser to Anna Hazare, the activist who has pushed India’s Parliament to adopt legislation creating an independent corruption monitor. The movement fell apart amid resistance from the governing United Progressive Alliance and growing tension between Hazare and Kejriwal.

Hazare continued to push for the legislation but believed he needed to do so in a nonpartisan way. Kejriwal disagreed, saying the failure of the movement meant he needed to become directly involved in electoral politics. So last year he formed his own party – known as Aam Aadmi, or Common Man – and declared his intention to fight in Delhi’s state elections.

Whispers among Delhi’s political establishment suggested that he had no chance of competing in a system known for corrupt pay-outs and among voters who expected hand-outs. But two weeks ago, Aam Aadmi won 28 seats in Delhi’s elections, compared with eight by the once-dominant Indian National Congress Party. Most embarrassing, Sheila Dikshit, the Congress Party’s long-time chief minister, was crushed in her own constituency. Those results may signal that India’s long-time political dynasty, the family of Sonia and Rahul Gandhi, could soon lose its grip on power.

The Bharatiya Janata Party, a Hindu nationalist party, won 31 seats in Delhi’s elections and was initially asked to form a government. But neither of the Hindu party’s rivals would lend support, so Kejriwal’s turn came.

Whether Kejriwal was willing to govern with help from the Congress Party, which he had criticized as hopelessly corrupt, was the much-asked question.

Kejriwal asked the people. More than half a million sent emails and text messages, and the party reported that the overwhelming response was that he should govern.

“It is not me who will be the chief minister,” Kejriwal told reporters in his office Monday. “It will be Delhi’s common man who will be the chief minister. Alone I cannot do anything.”

Significant challenges remain. Delhi is one of the world’s most polluted and crowded cities. A third of its residents live in slums with little access to sanitation or clean water; its electricity is fitful and its roads and poor infrastructure. Inflation is soaring, and India’s economy is flagging.

While he based his campaign on eliminating corruption, Kejriwal also promised to slash electricity rates in half and give free water to every Delhi household. He also promised to build 200,000 community and public toilets.

“It is easy to lead a movement but difficult to run a political party,” said Sudha Pai, a political science professor at Jawaharlal Nehru University. “Now they have to deliver on their promises of cheap electricity, free water and corruption-free government. Those are not easy promises to fulfill.”

Courtesy : ©  The New York Times News Service

India : Assembly Elections : Updates

Click on the Image to see live status and Updates

Click on the Image to see live status and Updates

BJP LEADS almost in all the four states, however one among it is a neck to neck between them and Ruling Congress Party. Will this Change of Rule Bring any positives to India?

Modi’fication has begun…

Courtesy and Source : Times of India

Where India Stands in Delivery of Justice? Ex:29 Years Trail, yet no justice!

Twenty-nine years after the deadly gas leak from the Union Carbide plant in Bhopal, India, the scars of this tragedy are not just visible but continue to hound the victims amidst long legal battles and continued government apathy.

The Supreme Court of India on October 29, 2013 ordered parity in the salary of 50 women survivors who demanded equal pay for equal work.

Of the 90 survivors 50 victims approached court but every time they got a favorable order the state challenged it in a higher court. This battle continued till October 29, 2013 when the Supreme Court awarded a one time full and final settlement of Rs 2 lakh to the victims along with a salary of Rs 15,360 from November 1. The victims after this long battle are now shattered.

Many of these women are nearing the age of 60. They will soon retire from their jobs without any savings and without any pension. Every year these victims reiterate their resolve to fight for justice but there is little hope.

This order from the Supreme Court that came after 23 long years is hardly any solace as most of the women survivors are now on the verge of reaching the retirement age.

According to World Justice Project’s Survey and Data India is one of the Poor performers when it comes to Delivery of Justice. Bhopal Victims are again victimized by the Judiciary system of India.

Here are the Statistics from the report which just conveys there is absolute relevance and the data speaks the truth. Look at the scores of People’s access to affordable Civil Justice(7.1), Civil Justice free of Corruption(7.2), Discrimination(7.3), not subject to unreasonable delays(7.5), free from improper Govt. Influence(7.4) and effective enforcements(7.6), India not even stands half way mark on these when compared to the best delivery of justice in the world. [in ( braces ) are indexes to look in the graph below]

Unreasonable delays very poor! Just it tells the story of the Bhopal Case! 

Delivery of Justice INDIA

Considered the world’s worst industrial disaster, the gas tragedy took place on the intervening night of December 2-3, 1984.

The leakage of the deadly gas methyl isocyanate from the plant of multi-national company Union Carbide India Limited killed over 3000 people and affected over 5 lakh people.

The services of these women who were initially employed with the stationary production unit of the state Industries department were handed over to the government press.

At the press these women worked like any other employee but there was a huge disparity in the salaries that they got and also their services were not regularised. The victims protested at every possible forum and even undertook a march to Delhi in 1989 but all they got was just assurances.

(Inside Quotes)– Excerpts from IBN Live

Courtesy : World Justice Report and IBN LIVE