Know : FIFA World Cup Qualifiers Facts

Totally 204 Countries across the world aimed for a spot to play the FIFA World Cup 2014, played 820 matches and scored 2350 Goals! Finally 32 countries made it to the Group Stages! No Wonder why Football has more fans around the globe.

 Group A
Brazil
Croatia
Mexico
Cameroon
 Group B
Spain
Netherlands
Chile
Australia
 Group C
Colombia
Greece
Côte d’Ivoire
Japan
 Group D
Uruguay
Costa Rica
England
Italy
 Group E
Switzerland
Ecuador
France
Honduras
 Group F
Argentina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Iran
Nigeria
 Group G
Germany
Portugal
Ghana
USA
 Group H
Belgium
Algeria
Russia
Korea Republic

Qualifiers

Continent wise Qualified / Unqualified Teams

(Click on the link of the countries for more details)

AFRICA

QUALIFIED TEAMS (5)

  1. AlgeriaAlgeria
  2. CameroonCameroon
  3. Côte d'IvoireCôte d’Ivoire
  4. GhanaGhana
  5. NigeriaNigeria

NOT QUALIFIED TEAMS (47)

  1. AngolaAngola
  2. BeninBenin
  3. BotswanaBotswana
  4. Burkina FasoBurkina Faso
  5. BurundiBurundi
  6. Cape Verde IslandsCape Verde Islands
  7. Central African RepublicCentral African Republic
  8. ChadChad
  9. ComorosComoros
  10. CongoCongo
  11. Congo DRCongo DR
  12. DjiboutiDjibouti
  13. EgyptEgypt
  14. Equatorial GuineaEquatorial Guinea
  15. EritreaEritrea
  16. EthiopiaEthiopia
  17. GabonGabon
  18. GambiaGambia
  19. GuineaGuinea
  20. Guinea-BissauGuinea-Bissau
  21. KenyaKenya
  22. LesothoLesotho
  23. LiberiaLiberia
  24. LibyaLibya
  25. MadagascarMadagascar
  26. MalawiMalawi
  27. MaliMali
  28. MauritiusMauritius
  29. MoroccoMorocco
  30. MozambiqueMozambique
  31. NamibiaNamibia
  32. NigerNiger
  33. RwandaRwanda
  34. Sao Tome e Principe Sao Tome e Principe
  35. SenegalSenegal
  36. SeychellesSeychelles
  37. Sierra LeoneSierra Leone
  38. SomaliaSomalia
  39. South AfricaSouth Africa
  40. SudanSudan
  41. SwazilandSwaziland
  42. TanzaniaTanzania
  43. TogoTogo
  44. TunisiaTunisia
  45. UgandaUganda
  46. ZambiaZambia
  47. ZimbabweZimbabwe


ASIA

QUALIFIED TEAMS (4)

  1. AustraliaAustralia
  2. IranIran
  3. JapanJapan
  4. Korea RepublicKorea Republic

NOT QUALIFIED TEAMS (39)

  1. AfghanistanAfghanistan
  2. BahrainBahrain
  3. BangladeshBangladesh
  4. CambodiaCambodia
  5. China PRChina PR
  6. Chinese TaipeiChinese Taipei
  7. Hong KongHong Kong
  8. IndiaIndia
  9. IndonesiaIndonesia
  10. IraqIraq
  11. JordanJordan
  12. Korea DPRKorea DPR
  13. KuwaitKuwait
  14. KyrgyzstanKyrgyzstan
  15. LaosLaos
  16. LebanonLebanon
  17. MacauMacau
  18. MalaysiaMalaysia
  19. MaldivesMaldives
  20. MongoliaMongolia
  21. MyanmarMyanmar
  22. NepalNepal
  23. OmanOman
  24. PakistanPakistan
  25. PalestinePalestine
  26. PhilippinesPhilippines
  27. QatarQatar
  28. Saudi ArabiaSaudi Arabia
  29. SingaporeSingapore
  30. Sri LankaSri Lanka
  31. SyriaSyria
  32. TajikistanTajikistan
  33. ThailandThailand
  34. Timor-LesteTimor-Leste
  35. TurkmenistanTurkmenistan
  36. United Arab EmiratesUnited Arab Emirates
  37. UzbekistanUzbekistan
  38. VietnamVietnam
  39. YemenYemen

Know : List of Top 50 Countries : E-Government Readiness

E-government (short for electronic government, also known as e-gov, Internet government, digital government, online government, or connected government) consists of the digital interactions between a government and citizens (G2C), government and businesses/commerce (G2B), government and employees (G2E), between government and employees /agencies (G2G), as well as citizen interaction with their government (C2G).

The following is the list of the top 50 countries, according to the UN’s 2012 e-Government Readiness Index.

Rank Country Index
1  South Korea 0.9283
2  Netherlands 0.9125
3  United Kingdom 0.8960
4  Denmark 0.8889
5  United States 0.8687
6  France 0.8635
7  Sweden 0.8599
8  Norway 0.8593
9  Finland 0.8505
10  Singapore 0.8474
11  Canada 0.8430
12  Australia 0.8390
13  New Zealand 0.8381
14  Liechtenstein 0.8264
15   Switzerland 0.8134
16  Israel 0.8100
17  Germany 0.8079
18  Japan 0.8019
19  Luxembourg 0.8014
20  Estonia 0.7987
21  Austria 0.7840
22  Iceland 0.7835
23  Spain 0.7770
24  Belgium 0.7718
25  Slovenia 0.7492
26  Monaco 0.7468
27  Russian Federation 0.7345
28  United Arab Emirates 0.7344
29  Lithuania 0.7333
30  Croatia 0.7328
31  Hungary 0.7208
32  Italy 0.7190
33  Portugal 0.7165
34  Ireland 0.7194
35  Malta 0.7131
36  Bahrain 0.6946
37  Greece 0.6872
38  Kazakhstan 0.6844
39  Chile 0.6769
40  Malaysia 0.6703
41  Saudi Arabia 0.6658
42  Latvia 0.6604
43  Colombia 0.6572
44  Barbados 0.6566
45  Cyprus 0.6508
46  Czech Republic 0.6491
47  Poland 0.6441
48  Qatar 0.6405
49  Antigua and Barbuda 0.6345
50  Uruguay 0.6315

There are several international rankings of e-government maturity. The Eurostat rankings, Economist, Brown University, and the UN e-Government Readiness Index are among the most frequently cited. The United Nations Public Administration Network conducts a bi-annual e-Government survey which includes a section titled e-Government Readiness. It is a comparative ranking of the countries of the world according to two primary indicators: i) the state of e-government readiness; and ii) the extent of e-participation. Constructing a model for the measurement of digitized services, the Survey assesses the 191 member states of the UN according to a quantitative composite index of e-government readiness based on website assessment; telecommunication infrastructure and human resource endowment.


Courtesy : Wikipedia

Know : Ranking of Countries : Where to be Born?

The index was calculated for 2013 and includes data from 80 countries and territories. The survey used ten quality of life factors along with forecasts of future GDP per capita to determine a nation’s score.

A Comparison from 1988 to 2013

Where to be born Rankings 2013

Rank Country or territory Score
(out of 10)
1   Switzerland 8.22
2  Australia 8.12
3  Norway 8.09
4  Sweden 8.02
5  Denmark 8.01
6  Singapore 8.00
7  New Zealand 7.95
8  Netherlands 7.94
9  Canada 7.81
10  Hong Kong 7.80
11  Finland 7.76
12  Ireland 7.74
13  Austria 7.73
14  Taiwan 7.67
15  Belgium 7.51
16  Germany 7.38
16  United States 7.38
18  United Arab Emirates 7.33
19  South Korea 7.25
20  Israel 7.23
21  Italy 7.21
22  Kuwait 7.18
23  Chile 7.10
24  Cyprus 7.10
25  Japan 7.08
26  France 7.04
27  United Kingdom 7.01
28  Czech Republic 6.96
28  Spain 6.96
30  Costa Rica 6.92
30  Portugal 6.92
32  Slovenia 6.77
33  Poland 6.66
34  Greece 6.65
35  Slovakia 6.64
36  Malaysia 6.62
37  Brazil 6.52
38  Saudi Arabia 6.49
39  Mexico 6.41
40  Argentina 6.39
40  Cuba 6.39
42  Colombia 6.27
43  Peru 6.24
44  Estonia 6.07
44  Venezuela 6.07
46  Croatia 6.06
46  Hungary 6.06
48  Latvia 6.01
49  China 5.99
50  Thailand 5.96
51  Turkey 5.95
52  Dominican Republic 5.93
53  South Africa 5.89
54  Algeria 5.86
54  Serbia 5.86
56  Romania 5.85
57  Lithuania 5.82
58  Iran 5.78
59  Tunisia 5.77
60  Egypt 5.76
61  Bulgaria 5.73
62  El Salvador 5.72
63=  Philippines 5.71
63  Sri Lanka 5.71
65  Ecuador 5.70
66  India 5.67
66  Morocco 5.67
68  Vietnam 5.64
69  Jordan 5.63
70  Azerbaijan 5.60
71  Indonesia 5.54
72  Russia 5.31
73  Syria 5.29
74  Kazakhstan 5.20
75  Pakistan 5.17
76  Angola 5.09
77  Bangladesh 5.07
78  Ukraine 4.98
79  Kenya 4.91
80  Nigeria 4.74

The Economist Intelligence Unit’s where-to-be-born index, (previously called the quality-of-life index) attempts to measure which country will provide the best opportunities for a healthy, safe and prosperous life in the years ahead. It is based on a method that links the results of subjective life-satisfaction surveys to the objective determinants of quality of life across countries along with a forward-looking element.

The independent variables in the estimating equa­tion include:  (2006)

  • Material wellbeing as measured by GDP per capita
  • Life expectancy at birth
  • The quality of family life based primarily on divorce rates
  • The state of political freedoms
  • Job security (measured by the unemployment rate)
  • Climate (measured by two variables: the average deviation of minimum and maximum monthly temperatures from 14 degrees Celsius; and the number of months in the year with less than 30mm rainfall)
  • Personal physical security ratings (based primarily on recorded homicide rates and ratings for risk from crime and terrorism)
  • Quality of community life (based on membership in so­cial organisations)
  • Governance (measured by ratings for corruption)
  • Gender equality (measured by the share of seats in parliament held by women).

Courtesy and Source : www.economist.com and Wikipedia

Know : Rankings of Countries : Global Innovation Index

The core of the Global Innovation Index Report consists of a ranking of world economies’ innovation capabilities and results. Recognizing the key role of innovation as a driver of economic growth and prosperity, and the need for a broad horizontal vision of innovation applicable to developed and emerging economies, the GII includes indicators that go beyond the traditional measures of innovation such as the level of research and development.

Global Innovation Index

The top-ranked countries in the GII come from different parts of the globe, confirming the global dispersion of innovation. The top 10 this year are ranked as follows:

1. Switzerland (1st in 2012)
2. Sweden (2nd)
3. United Kingdom (5th)
4. Netherlands (6th)
5. United States of America (10th)
6. Finland (4th)
7. Hong Kong (China) (8th)
8. Singapore (3rd)
9. Denmark (7th), and
10. Ireland (9th).

Top GII by region

Complete List of Rankings

Country/Economy Score (0–100) Overall Rank Income  Income Rank Region Regional Rank Efficiency Ratio  Rank
Switzerland 66.59 1 HI 1 EUR 1 1 12
Sweden 61.36 2 HI 2 EUR 2 0.81 55
United Kingdom 61.25 3 HI 3 EUR 3 0.8 60
Netherlands 61.14 4 HI 4 EUR 4 0.91 26
United States of America 60.31 5 HI 5 NAC 1 0.74 86
Finland 59.51 6 HI 6 EUR 5 0.79 67
Hong Kong (China) 59.43 7 HI 7 SEAO 1 0.68 109
Singapore 59.41 8 HI 8 SEAO 2 0.64 121
Denmark 58.34 9 HI 9 EUR 6 0.76 78
Ireland 57.91 10 HI 10 EUR 7 0.81 57
Canada 57.6 11 HI 11 NAC 2 0.78 68
Luxembourg 56.57 12 HI 12 EUR 8 0.89 33
Iceland 56.4 13 HI 13 EUR 9 0.89 30
Israel 55.98 14 HI 14 NAWA 1 0.87 38
Germany 55.83 15 HI 15 EUR 10 0.87 40
Norway 55.64 16 HI 16 EUR 11 0.76 81
New Zealand 54.46 17 HI 17 SEAO 3 0.74 90
Korea Rep. 53.31 18 HI 18 SEAO 4 0.72 95
Australia 53.07 19 HI 19 SEAO 5 0.65 116
France 52.83 20 HI 20 EUR 12 0.79 63
Belgium 52.49 21 HI 21 EUR 13 0.76 75
Japan 52.23 22 HI 22 SEAO 6 0.66 112
Austria 51.87 23 HI 23 EUR 14 0.71 98
Malta 51.79 24 HI 24 EUR 15 1.06 4
Estonia 50.6 25 HI 25 EUR 16 0.82 51
Spain 49.41 26 HI 26 EUR 17 0.71 101
Cyprus 49.32 27 HI 27 NAWA 2 0.86 43
Czech Republic 48.36 28 HI 28 EUR 18 0.81 53
Italy 47.85 29 HI 29 EUR 19 0.79 62
Slovenia 47.32 30 HI 30 EUR 20 0.78 70
Hungary 46.93 31 HI 31 EUR 21 0.94 23
Malaysia 46.92 32 UM 1 SEAO 7 0.81 52
Latvia 45.24 33 UM 2 EUR 22 0.77 74
Portugal 45.1 34 HI 32 EUR 23 0.73 92
China 44.66 35 UM 3 SEAO 8 0.98 14
Slovakia 42.25 36 HI 33 EUR 24 0.75 84
Croatia 41.95 37 HI 34 EUR 25 0.82 50
United Arab Emirates 41.87 38 HI 35 NAWA 3 0.55 133
Costa Rica 41.54 39 UM 4 LCN 1 1.02 9
Lithuania 41.39 40 UM 5 EUR 26 0.69 105
Bulgaria 41.33 41 UM 6 EUR 27 0.88 35
Saudi Arabia 41.21 42 HI 36 NAWA 4 0.8 61
Qatar 41 43 HI 37 NAWA 5 0.71 97
Montenegro 40.95 44 UM 7 EUR 28 0.72 94
Moldova Rep. 40.94 45 LM 1 EUR 29 1.08 2
Chile 40.58 46 UM 8 LCN 2 0.74 88
Barbados 40.48 47 HI 38 LCN 3 0.73 91
Romania 40.33 48 UM 9 EUR 30 0.88 34
Poland 40.12 49 HI 39 EUR 31 0.68 110
Kuwait 40.02 50 HI 40 NAWA 6 1.03 8
TFYR of Macedonia 38.18 51 UM 10 EUR 32 0.72 96
Uruguay 38.08 52 UM 11 LCN 4 0.85 45
Mauritius 38 53 UM 12 SSF 1 0.8 59
Serbia 37.87 54 UM 13 EUR 33 0.82 49
Greece 37.71 55 HI 41 EUR 34 0.65 118
Argentina 37.66 56 UM 14 LCN 5 0.94 20
Thailand 37.63 57 UM 15 SEAO 9 0.76 76
South Africa 37.6 58 UM 16 SSF 2 0.71 99
Armenia 37.59 59 LM 2 NAWA 7 0.86 42
Colombia 37.38 60 UM 17 LCN 6 0.76 79
Jordan 37.3 61 UM 18 NAWA 8 0.77 73
Russian Federation 37.2 62 UM 19 EUR 35 0.7 104
Mexico 36.82 63 UM 20 LCN 7 0.81 56
Brazil 36.33 64 UM 21 LCN 8 0.78 69
Bosnia and Herzegovina 36.24 65 UM 22 EUR 36 0.7 103
India 36.17 66 LM 3 CSA 1 1.02 11
Bahrain 36.13 67 HI 42 NAWA 9 0.62 123
Turkey 36.03 68 UM 23 NAWA 10 0.9 29
Peru 35.96 69 UM 24 LCN 9 0.77 72
Tunisia 35.82 70 UM 25 NAWA 11 0.88 36
Ukraine 35.78 71 LM 4 EUR 37 0.89 31
Mongolia 35.77 72 LM 5 SEAO 10 0.62 122
Georgia 35.56 73 LM 6 NAWA 12 0.71 100
Brunei Darussalam 35.53 74 HI 43 SEAO 11 0.65 119
Lebanon 35.47 75 UM 26 NAWA 13 0.66 114
Viet Nam 34.82 76 LM 7 SEAO 12 0.96 17
Belarus 34.62 77 UM 27 EUR 38 0.75 82
Guyana 34.36 78 LM 8 LCN 10 0.97 15
Dominican Republic 33.28 79 UM 28 LCN 11 0.9 28
Oman 33.25 80 HI 44 NAWA 14 0.54 134
Trinidad and Tobago 33.17 81 HI 45 LCN 12 0.75 85
Jamaica 32.89 82 UM 29 LCN 13 0.79 65
Ecuador 32.83 83 UM 30 LCN 14 0.94 21
Kazakhstan 32.73 84 UM 31 CSA 2 0.61 126
Indonesia 31.95 85 LM 9 SEAO 13 1.04 6
Panama 31.82 86 UM 32 LCN 15 0.61 127
Guatemala 31.46 87 LM 10 LCN 16 0.79 66
El Salvador 31.32 88 LM 11 LCN 17 0.76 80
Uganda 31.21 89 LI 1 SSF 3 0.95 19
Philippines 31.18 90 LM 12 SEAO 14 0.93 24
Botswana 31.14 91 UM 33 SSF 4 0.51 136
Morocco 30.89 92 LM 13 NAWA 15 0.75 83
Albania 30.85 93 LM 14 EUR 39 0.58 129
Ghana 30.6 94 LM 15 SSF 5 0.8 58
Bolivia Plurinational St. 30.48 95 LM 16 LCN 18 0.88 37
Senegal 30.48 96 LM 17 SSF 6 0.95 18
Fiji 30.46 97 LM 18 SEAO 15 0.51 137
Sri Lanka 30.45 98 LM 19 CSA 3 0.99 13
Kenya 30.28 99 LI 2 SSF 7 0.78 71
Paraguay 30.28 100 LM 20 LCN 19 0.82 48
Tajikistan 30 101 LI 3 CSA 4 0.9 27
Belize 29.98 102 LM 21 LCN 20 0.73 93
Cape Verde 29.69 103 LM 22 SSF 8 0.57 130
Swaziland 29.6 104 LM 23 SSF 9 1.06 5
Azerbaijan 28.99 105 UM 34 NAWA 16 0.65 117
Mali 28.84 106 LI 4 SSF 10 1.13 1
Honduras 28.8 107 LM 24 LCN 21 0.66 115
Egypt 28.48 108 LM 25 NAWA 17 0.68 108
Namibia 28.36 109 UM 35 SSF 11 0.48 139
Cambodia 28.07 110 LI 5 SEAO 16 0.87 39
Gabon 28.04 111 UM 36 SSF 12 0.81 54
Rwanda 27.64 112 LI 6 SSF 13 0.64 120
Iran Islamic Rep. 27.3 113 UM 37 CSA 5 0.68 107
Venezuela Bolivarian Rep. 27.25 114 UM 38 LCN 22 1.02 10
Nicaragua 27.1 115 LM 26 LCN 23 0.62 125
Burkina Faso 27.03 116 LI 7 SSF 14 0.79 64
Kyrgyzstan 26.98 117 LI 8 CSA 6 0.56 131
Zambia 26.79 118 LM 27 SSF 15 0.89 32
Malawi 26.73 119 LI 9 SSF 16 0.87 41
Nigeria 26.57 120 LM 28 SSF 17 1.03 7
Mozambique 26.5 121 LI 10 SSF 18 0.67 111
Gambia 26.39 122 LI 11 SSF 19 0.86 44
Tanzania United Rep. 26.35 123 LI 12 SSF 20 0.66 113
Lesotho 26.29 124 LM 29 SSF 21 0.47 140
Cameroon 25.71 125 LM 30 SSF 22 0.84 47
Guinea 25.7 126 LI 13 SSF 23 1.07 3
Benin 25.1 127 LI 14 SSF 24 0.69 106
Nepal 24.97 128 LI 15 CSA 7 0.76 77
Ethiopia 24.8 129 LI 16 SSF 25 0.74 87
Bangladesh 24.52 130 LI 17 CSA 8 0.84 46
Niger 24.03 131 LI 18 SSF 26 0.71 102
Zimbabwe 23.98 132 LI 19 SSF 27 0.91 25
Uzbekistan 23.87 133 LM 31 CSA 9 0.52 135
Syrian Arab Republic 23.73 134 LM 32 NAWA 18 0.45 142
Angola 23.46 135 UM 39 SSF 28 0.94 22
Côte d’Ivoire 23.42 136 LM 33 SSF 29 0.74 89
Pakistan 23.33 137 LM 34 CSA 10 0.97 16
Algeria 23.11 138 UM 40 NAWA 19 0.46 141
Togo 23.04 139 LI 20 SSF 30 0.56 132
Madagascar 22.95 140 LI 21 SSF 31 0.59 128
Sudan 19.81 141 LM 35 SSF 32 0.49 138
Yemen 19.32 142 LM 36 NAWA 20 0.62 124

Note: World Bank Income Group Classification (July 2012): LI = low income; LM = lower-middle income; UM = upper-middle income; and HI = high income. Regions are based on the United Nations Classification (11 February 2013): EUR = Europe; NAC = Northern America; LCN = Latin America and the Caribbean; CSA = Central and Southern Asia; SEAO = South East Asia and Oceania; NAWA = Northern Africa and Western Asia; and SSF = Sub-Saharan Africa.

The Global Innovation Index 2013 (GII), in its 6th edition this year, is co-published by Cornell University, INSEAD, and the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO, a specialized agency of the United Nations).


Courtesy: Wikipedia and www.globalinnovationindex.org

Know : Vegetarianism by country

Asia

China

Native Chinese religion, generally falling under the label of Daoism (though this tends to confuse the native religion with the Daoist school of philosophy, represented by Laotzu, Chuangtzu, and others), is a form of animism. Similar to Shintoism in Japan, though the killing and eating of animals is not forbidden, it is considered impure.

Classical Chinese texts pointed to a period of abstinence from meat as well as sex and contact with other things that are considered impure (e.g. women in menstruation) before undertaking matters of great import or of religious significance.

With the influx of Buddhist influences, vegetarianism became more popular, but there is a distinction—Daoist vegetarianism is based on a perception of purity, while Buddhist vegetarianism is based on the dual bases of refraining from killing and subduing one’s own subservience to the senses. Because of this, two types of “vegetarianism” came to be—one where one refrained from eating meat, the other being refraining from eating meat as well as pepper, garlic, onions, and other such strongly flavored foods. This Buddhism-influenced vegetarianism has been known and practiced by some since at least the 7th century. In recent years, it has seen a new resurgence in the cities as the emerging middle class in China pay attention to issues of health and diet. In 2010, Prime Minister Wen Jiabao (温家宝总理) proposed a nationwide campaign of “one day of vegetarianism every week” (每周一素), mainly as part of a broader environmental platform.

Republic of China (Taiwan)

In Taiwan, 1.7 million people, or 13% of the population of Taiwan, follows a vegetarian diet at least some of the time. There are more than 6,000 vegetarian eating establishments in Taiwan. Food labelling laws for vegetarian food are the world’s strictest, because around 2 million Taiwanese people use vegetarian food. A popular movement of “one day vegetarian every week” has been advocated on a national level, and on a local level, even government bodies are involved, such as the Taipei City Board of Education.

Thailand

Buddhist monks are not vegetarians as they have to accept all food offerings. Fish sauce and oil are very common Thai food ingredients even in food described as vegetarian. The number of real vegetarians-vegans, semi-vegetarians (Pesco= eating fish) and regular part-time vegetarians (once or twice a week, or the whole 10 days during the Annual Vegetarian Festival in October) are significantly growing. The number of vegetarian shops and restaurants are also increasing in 76 provinces around the country.

The population of Thai vegetarians could be counted by groups as the followings: 1. Real vegetarians-vegans, 2. Semi-vegetarians 3. Regular part-time vegetarians

Israel

Vegetarianism has become increasingly popular in Israel in recent years, as more and more people become aware of the health and moral aspects of the phenomenon and as many vegan food stalls and restaurants emerge. In the only study conducted on adults by the Ministry of Health in 2001, 7.2% of the men and 9.8% of the women identified themselves as vegetarians. In a 2004 study on youth, 11% of the boys and 20% of the girls considered themselves as vegetarians. Although Vegetarianism is quite common in Israel, the estimated percentage of vegetarians in Israel may be lower – the Israeli food industry estimated it at 5%.

India

As of 2007, UNFAO statistics indicated that Indians had the lowest rate of meat consumption in the world. In India, vegetarianism is usually synonymous with lacto vegetarianism. Most restaurants in India clearly distinguish and market themselves as being either “non-vegetarian”, “vegetarian”, or “pure vegetarian”. Vegetarian restaurants abound, usually, many vegetarian (Shakahari: plant-eater, in Sanskrit) options are available. Animal-based ingredients (other than milk and honey) such as lard,gelatin, and meat stock are not used in the traditional cuisine. India has devised a system of marking edible products made from only vegetarian ingredients, with a green dot in a green square. A mark of a brown dot in a brown square conveys that some animal-based ingredients (other than milk or its direct derivatives) were used.

According to the 2006 Hindu-CNN-IBN State of the Nation Survey, 31% of Indians are vegetarians, while another 9% consumes eggs. Among the various communities, vegetarianism was most common among Jain community and then Brahmins at 55%, and less frequent among Muslims (3%) and residents of coastal states. Other surveys cited by FAO and USDA estimate 20%–42% of the Indian population as being vegetarian. These surveys indicate that even Indians who do eat meat, do so infrequently, with less than 30% consuming it regularly, although the reasons are mainly cultural and partially economical.

The recent growth in India’s organized retail has also been hit by some controversy, because some vegetarians are demanding meatless supermarkets.

Japan

Japan has been dubbed by SkyScanner as one of the “Top 5 Carnivorous Countries”.

Oceania

Australia

In Australia, some manufacturers who target the vegetarian market will label their foods with the statement “suitable for vegetarians”; however, for foods intended for export to the UK, this labelling can be inconsistent because flavourings in ingredients lists do not need to specify if they come from animal origin. As such, natural flavour could be derived from either plant or animal sources.

Animal rights organisations such as Animal Liberation promote vegan and vegetarian diets. “Vegetarian Week” runs from 01 – 7 October every year, and food companies are taking advantage of the growing number of vegetarians by producing meat-free alternatives of popular dishes, including sausages and mash and Spaghetti Bolognese.

According to a 2010 Newspoll Survey, 5% of Australians identify themselves as vegetarians with 2% actually eating a diet defined by the survey as vegetarian.

Another 2000 Newspoll survey (commissioned by Sanitarium) shows 44% of Australians report eating at least one meat-free evening meal a week, while 18% said they prefer plant-based meals.

New Zealand

Similar to other Australasian countries such as Australia, in New Zealand the term vegetarian refers to individuals who eat no animal meat such as pork, chicken, and fish; but may still consume animal products such as milk and eggs. In contrast, the term vegan is used to describe those who do not eat any by-products of animals. In 2002 New Zealand’s vegetarians made up a tiny minority, between 1-2% of the country’s 4.5 million people

As New Zealand and Australia work together to form common food standards (as seen in the Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) and the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code), there is also a lot of ambiguity surrounding the “natural flavour” ingredients.

Europe

The definition of vegetarianism throughout Europe is not uniform, creating the potential for products to be labelled inaccurately.

Belgium

Since May 2009, Belgium has the first city in the world (Ghent) with a weekly “veggie day”.

France

In October 2011, the European Vegetarian Union reported that the French government’s Décret 2011-1227 and associated Arrêté (September 30, 2011) effectively outlaws the serving of vegan meals at any public or private school in France. Similar decrees are proposed for kindergartens, hospitals, prisons and retirement homes.

Studies in the 1990s showed that one million French (1.5% of the total population) called themselves vegetarians, although more recently this number has reportedly increased to 2%.

Germany

According to Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Germany has over six million vegetarians. A survey conducted by Institut Produkt und Markt, found that 9% of the population (7,380,000 people) are vegetarian,which the Italian research institute Eurispes reports as the second highest rate of vegetarianism in the European Union (after Italy).

Italy

The Italian research institute Eurispes reports that according to the European Vegetarian Union, Italy has over six million vegetarians and the highest rate of vegetarianism in the European Union, at 10% of the population.

Netherlands

Vegetarianism is fairly common in the Netherlands. A study has shown that the number of vegetarians out of a population of nearly 16.5 million people increased from 560,000 in 2004 to 720,000 in 2006. It is estimated that 4.5% of the Dutch population don’t eat meat. The number of part-time vegetarians grew rapidly as well: around 3.5 million Dutch citizens abstain from eating meat a few days a week.

The sales of meat substitutes has an annual growth of around 25%, making it one of the fastest-growing markets in the Netherlands. In supermarkets and stores, it is sometimes necessary to read the fine print on products in order to make sure that there are no animal-originated ingredients. Increasingly, however, vegetarian products are labeled with the international “V-label,” overseen by the Dutch vegetarian association Vegetarisch Keurmerk.

Veganism is uncommon in the Netherlands: the Dutch Association for Veganism estimates that there are approximately 16,000 vegans in the Netherlands, or around 0.1% of the Dutch population.

Portugal

The Vegetarian Society of Portugal was founded c. 1908 by Amílcar de Sousa. In 2007, the number of vegetarians in Portugal was estimated at 30,000, which equates to less than 0.3% of the population. In October 2012, this number was estimated at 200.000, being more noticeable in people aged 55 to 70.

Spain

In Spain, different sources estimate that there are between 1.5 to 2 million vegetarians. In a 2002 article El Mundo cited 1.5 million vegetarians at the time. More recent sources (Asociación Vegana) set the demographics in two millions and observed that in the latest years the trend accelerated. In the other hand in a 2012 article, El Pais wrote that 0.5% of the population were vegetarians. The European Vegetarian Union cites 1.800.000 vegetarians, a 4% of the population.

Sweden

In Sweden, vegetarian most often means lacto-ovo vegetarian. Most but not all restaurants offer at least one lacto-ovo vegetarian dish. Different studies give different number of vegetarians in Sweden, but likely somewhere between 1% and 3% of the population are vegetarians.

Switzerland

According to Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Switzerland has the second highest rate of vegetarianism in the European Union (even though Switzerland is not in the EU, it was most likely included with the other EU countries for this study). Older governmental data from 1997 suggest that 2.3% of the population never eat meat and the observed trend seemed to point towards less meat consumption. Newer studies suggest that the percentage of vegetarians has risen to 5% by 2007.

United Kingdom

In the United Kingdom, increasing numbers of people have adopted a vegetarian diet since the end of World War II. The Food Standards Agency Public Attitudes to Food Survey 2009 reported that 3% of respondents were found to be “completely vegetarian”, with an additional 5% “partly vegetarian (don’t eat some types of fish or meat)”. Some independent market studies suggest that vegetarians constitute 7% to 11% of the UK adult population (4 million people). As of 2003, the Vegetarian Society estimates that there are between three and four million vegetarians in the UK. There are twice as many vegetarian women as men. Despite the clear classification by the Vegetarian Society, some people in the UK identify as vegetarians while still eating fish, either for health reasons, or because of differing ethical perspectives on vegetarianism, while others use the term “flexitarian” or part-vegetarian. As of 2009, people in the UK are now also being identified with the labels “meat-avoiders” and “meat-reducers” by marketeers, denoting people who do not self-identify as vegetarians, but are reducing or avoiding meat for reasons of health or climate change impacts, with one survey identifying 23% of the population as “meat-reducers”, and 10% as “meat-avoiders”, although the same survey indicated the “vast majority” in the UK still eat meat, with one-in-five liking to eat meat every day. According to Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, the UK has the third highest rate of vegetarianism in the European Union.

Foods labelled as suitable for vegetarians or vegans are subject to provisions within the Trades Descriptions Act 1968. The Food Standards Agency issues guidance on the labelling of foods as suitable for vegetarians:

The term ‘vegetarian’ should not be applied to foods that are, or are made from or with the aid of, products derived from animals that have died, have been slaughtered, or animals that die as a result of being eaten. Animals means farmed, wild or domestic animals, including for example, livestock poultry, game, fish, shellfish, crustaceans, amphibians, tunicates, echinoderms, molluscs, and insects.

—Food Standards Agency
The FSA’s definition has now passed into European law, with legislation due in 2015.

In addition to voluntary labelling, the Vegetarian Society operates a scheme whereby foods that meet its criteria can be labelled “Vegetarian Society approved”. Under this scheme, a product is vegetarian if it is free of meat, fowl, fish, shellfish, meat or bone stock, animal or carcass fats, gelatin, aspic, or any other ingredient resulting from slaughter, such as rennet. Cheese is often labelled as well, making it possible to identify cheeses that have been made with rennet derived from non-animal sources. Many hard cheeses in continental Europe contain rennet derived from animal sources.

Russia

Much of Russian traditional food is meat-based, and fast food such as McDonald’s and KFC are becoming quite popular in Russia, so vegetarianism is not very widespread in the country. Sources have implied that it is growing but the numbers are still small compared to Western nations. However, a Russian-language vegetarian group on VK has over 60,000 members, also implying a growth of vegetarianism in the country.

The Americas

Brazil

In 2004, Marly Winckler, President of the Brazilian Vegetarian Society claimed that 5% of the population is vegetarian. According to a 2012 survey undertaken by the Brazilian Institute of Public Opinion and Statistics, 8% of the population, that is, 15.2 million people, identified themselves as vegetarian. The city of São Paulo has the most vegetarians in absolute terms (792,120 people), while Fortaleza has the highest percentage, at 14% of the total population.

Marly Winckler claims that the central reasons for the deforestation of the Amazon are expansive livestock raising (mainly cattle) and soybean crops, most of it for use as an animal feeding, and a minor percentage for edible oil processing (being direct human consumption for use as food nearly negligible), claims that are widely known to have a basis.

As in Canada, vegetarianismo (Portuguese pronunciation: veʒiˌtaɾjɐ̃ˈnizmu) is usually synonymous with lacto-ovo-vegetarianism and vegetarians are sometimes wrongly assumed to be pescetarians and/or pollotarians who tolerate the flesh of fish or poultry, respectively. Nevertheless, veganism, and freeganism, are very common among Brazilian anarchists, punks and members of other groups in the counterculture and/or left-wingmovements. Other beliefs generally associated with Brazilian vegetarians are Eastern philosophies and religions, New Age and Spiritism, while it is also commonly said to be related to the emo and indie youth subculturesas influence from the local punks. Brazilian vegetarians reportedly tend to be urban, of middle or upper class and live in the Central-Southern half of the country. Since the 1990s, and especially since the 2000s, several vegetarian and vegan restaurants appeared in the metropolitan regions of São Paulo, Porto Alegre, Curitiba and Rio de Janeiro.

Canada

In Canada, vegetarianism is usually synonymous with ovo-lacto vegetarianism. However, vegetarians are sometimes wrongly assumed to be pescetarians or pollotarians. Approximately 4.0% of adults are vegetarians as of 2003.

United States

Vegetarianism was endorsed in the United States in 1838 by the American Health Convention. In 1971, 1 percent of U.S. citizens described themselves as vegetarians. A 2013 Public Policy Polling survey found 13% of Americans identify as vegetarian (6%) or vegan (7%). A 2012 Gallup poll found 5% of Americans identify as vegetarian and 2% as vegan. A 2008 Harris Interactive poll found that 10% of adults “largely follow a vegetarian-inclined diet,” with 3.2% following a vegetarian diet and 0.5% identifying as vegans. A 2000 Zogby Poll found that 2.5% of respondents reported not eating meat, poultry, or fish; while 4.5 percent reported not eating meat.

Many children in the United States whose parents follow vegetarian diets follow them because of religious or ethical beliefs, for animal rights, or for the environment or other reasons. In the government’s first estimate of how many children avoid meat, the number is about 1 in 200. Also, the CDC survey included children ages 0 to 17 years. Possibly, older children are more likely to follow a vegetarian diet, so differences in age could explain some of the difference in results between the surveys.

U.S. vegetarian food sales (meat replacements such as soy milk and textured vegetable protein) doubled between 1998 and 2003, reaching $1.6 billion in 2003.

By U.S. law, food packaging is regulated by the Food and Drug Administration, and generally must be labeled with a list of all its ingredients. However, there are exceptions. For example, certain trace ingredients that are “ingredients of ingredients” do not need to be listed.

Courtesy : Wikipedia