God is far beyond Religions: The way I see…

spiritual journey

You can understand your God Spiritually, only when you abandon the attachment to your religion. One can follow any religion to explore God, but if you do not follow the virtues of God. Then you are just religious…

In this article I tried to explain my spiritual journey, the questions I asked myself and the answers I found. With no bias, with no hatred, just a logical sequence of thoughts.

Well known, ultimate truths about religions

Whatever the religion one may follow, they do because they believe in God that religion claims as a super power.

At deeper level of thoughts it is clear that religion is just a name of the path, to reach the God.

All religions preach some values, morals, practices and procedures, which indeed are purely based on cultures that had developed in the particular regions. Culture and Religion grown together.

Culture and Religion

Culture is nothing but the way of living, as we know, we all have different cultures. We knew a little history which no one need to explain us or teach us. That history is our life time. We witness things by our very own senses and understand. So think how was your religion and the culture associated, when you were a child and now? You can obviously see some changes.

Yesterday’s taboo have got acceptance and today it is ok. I think you can find any example easily for this.

Change changes Everything, so as religion

Look at how man interpreted God, be it any religion. From most feared mythical figure to least bothered superstitious statue, we have given various importance to God. Religion also got so many changes from its original version, we consistently revived the religious terms based on the social acceptance and released advanced versions of religions, just like a software program. Example : Look at your own religions and sub faiths you have in that.

What Changes religion?

Nothing but the human compatibility. Yes. On the stone age, the expectation of a human being is just to eat food and to survive. But we are the only species which has been evolving continuously at thoughts. So those days the food source might be regarded as a gods,then our predators, then the protectors might be regarded as gods, later we seen humans as god, with extra abilities.

All are just predictions we cannot surely say which history of our religions is the truth, but the changes that had occur were undeniable. The changes the happened to the religions are undeniable truth.

Unreliable History

Think of a news that you see today, or a data. Can you assure 100% reliability on everything? Even the Science could only predict certain things. So that’s the reason why people still fight over religions, because there is no concrete proof to support their stand. All religious followers have chosen to believe in something. Nothing wrong with their beliefs, but the problems had began, when one’s belief tried to suppress others’ belief. When people tried to dominate one over another, they used the religion as a tool.

God Vs Religion

Religion is explainable. But God is not. You all agree this, though we have statues, mosques, churches, temples, idols, etc to worship god, when it comes to the question of feeling god – we all will be unanimous and say God can be felt, cannot be shown as we do in movie graphics. Back in history they had no HD cameras, so they sculptured God, written texts about God and believed that is the best way they can explain god. Named the faith with a religion’s name.

Deeper, It is all about feeling the God. But people tried to explain god via religion that has caused problems which we have not solved till date.

Spiritual Understanding

When people talk about spiritual but not religious, others may look at them like “oh here comes a meditation master from a Bodhi Tree District!” 🙂 No, it is not that complex to understand spirituality, when we feel about our relationship with another human, we may call it as love, caring, parenting, etc.

Same goes as Spiritual when we start to feel about God. One person can be spiritual only if he is not attached to any religions or any worldly things.

The major decision is whether you choose to believe in God or not is the first step, then exploring various faiths can make you understand the virtues of God, this is step two. Step three, you will realize all the faiths has the same values and characteristic of God.

Then the final step, when you try to be like God or follow the virtues of God, then you are spiritual being.

Why we need to understand something with so much complexity:

Because we have made it so complex. At our origin, we humans are not supposed to struggle like this, for example, to invent something like nuclear weapons and fight against it. We carve for more, we are addicted to selfishness.

Simply we attach ourselves to things and struggle to detach from that. We spend our whole life battling these attachments. Now our social system is built and strongly based on such attachments.

We just had one earth to live in harmony with all living beings. Look at where are we now? we have countries, borders, rules, weapons to kill one another, and what else is not there to complicate life? So un-tieing all these and going back to understanding God in a spiritual sense is just difficult only because we made it look difficult.

Keep it Simple

I hope you will accept everything in the earth serves for a purpose, lives for a purpose. Tree helps birds, they help trees, forests give rains, rains help oceans, oceans help fishes, the cycle goes round and round.

So believe, the system of Universe also has a purpose. Mars has its purpose, the Sun has, Jupiter has, A distant meteor has a purpose too. Don’t you believe? Why the planets should abide by some laws to revolve the Sun without clashing one another? Why the moon is kept at a distance, supporting life on earth?

Science can explain all these as how it works? but cannot tell why it works? That’s what I feel as the Universal Purpose.

Now if you see, religion looks so tiny in the large scale of the universe. Religions are myth. Religions are man made. Religions are imaginary stuff.

So, if we can understand this. Life will be so meaningful and pleasant, not only for us but also for the rest of the living beings.

You can understand your God Spiritually, only when you abandon the attachment to your religion. One can follow any religion to explore God, but if you do not follow the virtues of God. Then you are still religious.

- Din

Note: Whatever, i have tried to communicate here are my own understandings of God, I neither tried to convince you to accept it nor speak against your faith. Please do your own thinking, taking these points as some insights.

Know : World Population List and Facts

 

World_population 2014

What is the Total Population of the World?

Check out the list below, but here are some interesting facts about Population

World population refers to the total number of humans living in the world. The world population has been on a constant rise since the Great Famine and Black Death ended in 1350. With more humans born every year than dead, the earth is under increasing pressure to provide for their sustenance. Census is the exercise of counting the number of individuals living in a country. It is held by every country separately at regular intervals. The census come out with interesting facts and figures and some of them are listed below:

1. The world population is estimated to be more than 7.08 billion according the report of USCB (United States Census Bureau).

2. The highest growth rate of world population, ever recorded, was 2.2% back in 1963.

3. The rate of growth of world population reached its lowest level in recorded history during 2011 when it was just 1.1%.

4. The continent with highest population is Asia that accounts for 60% of world’s population. It has 4.2 billion inhabitants.

5. Antarctica is the only continent that does not have permanent inhabitants. Its population varies depending on the number of polar stations established there.

6. China is the most populous country of the world closely followed by India. China has a population of 1.35 billion whereas India closely follows it with a population of 1.21 billion. They, together, are home to 37% of world’s population.

7. Singapore is the most densely populated country of the world housing more than 7300 persons in an area of 1 square kilometer.

8. It is estimated that it took almost 123 years for the world’s population to reach 2 billion mark in 1927 from 1 billion in 1804 whereas it took only 13 years to reach 7 billion in 2012 form 6 billion in 1999.

9. The global sex ratio is 1010 males per 1000 females. This gender imbalance has been because of the severe imbalances present in Indian and Chinese populations.

10. The average life expectancy of the global population is 65.07 years. This means that an individual, on an average, dies at an age of 65.07 years.

11. Women have higher life expectancy of 69 years as compared to men who, on an average, live for only 65 years.

12. If the average weight of a person is considered to be 140 pounds then the total weight of the entire global population is estimated to be 287 million tonnes.

13. 12.44% of world’s population speaks Mandarin making it the most spoken language of the world. Mandarin is followed by Spanish (4.85%) and English (4.83%).

14. The global literacy rate is 85%. This means that 85 out of 100 people of the world which are aged 15 or more can read and write.

15. The number of individuals with age less than 15 years constitute 26.3% of the total population whereas those aged between 15 and 64 have a 65.9% share of the global .population. 7.9% of the world population has an age of 65 years or above.

Rank Continent Population
2013
±% p.a.
2010-2013
World 7,162,119,000 1.17%
1 Asia 4,298,723,000 1.06%
2 Africa 1,110,635,000 2.51%
3 Americas 972,005,000 1.03%
4 Europe 742,452,000 0.10%
5 Oceania 38,304,000 1.47%

Countrywise List

Note: All dependent territories are shown in italics.

Rank Country (or dependent territory) Population Date % of world
population
Source
1  China 1,364,430,000 May 14, 2014 19% Official population clock
2  India 1,244,050,000 May 14, 2014 17.4% Population clock
3  United States 318,036,000 May 14, 2014 4.44% Official population clock
4  Indonesia 247,424,598 July 1, 2013 3.45% Official estimate
5  Brazil 202,554,000 May 14, 2014 2.83% Official population clock
6  Pakistan 186,444,000 May 14, 2014 2.6% Official population clock[9]
7  Nigeria 173,615,000 July 1, 2013 2.42% UN projection[6]
8  Bangladesh 152,518,015 July 16, 2012 2.13% Official estimate
9  Russia 143,700,000 January 1, 2014 2.04% Official estimate
10  Japan 127,140,000 April 1, 2014 1.78% Monthly official estimate
11  Mexico 119,713,203 July 1, 2014 1.67% CONAPO Official projection
12  Philippines 99,559,300 May 14, 2014 1.39% Official population clock
13  Vietnam 89,708,900 July 1, 2013 1.25% Official estimate
14  Ethiopia 86,613,986 July 1, 2013 1.21% Official estimate
15  Egypt 86,452,000 May 14, 2014 1.21% Official population clock
16  Germany 80,716,000 September 30, 2013 1.13% Monthly official estimate
17  Iran 77,430,000 May 14, 2014 1.08% Official population clock
18  Turkey 76,667,864 December 31, 2013 1.07% Official estimate
19  Democratic Republic of the Congo 67,514,000 July 1, 2013 0.94% UN projection
20  France[10] 65,885,000 April 1, 2014 0.92% Monthly official estimate
21  Thailand 64,456,700 July 1, 2012 0.9% Official estimate
22  United Kingdom 63,705,000 July 1, 2012 0.89% Official estimate
23  Italy 60,021,955 November 30, 2013 0.84% Monthly official estimate
24  Burma 53,259,000 July 1, 2013 0.74% UN projection
25  South Africa 52,981,991 July 1, 2013 0.74% Official estimate
26  South Korea 50,423,955 July 1, 2014 0.7% Official projection
27  Colombia 47,590,000 May 14, 2014 0.66% Official population clock
28  Spain 46,609,700 July 1, 2013 0.65% Annual official estimate
29  Ukraine 45,395,604 March 1, 2014 0.63% Monthly official estimate
30  Tanzania 44,928,923 August 26, 2012 0.63% 2012 census result
31  Kenya 44,354,000 July 1, 2013 0.62% UN projection
32  Argentina 42,669,500 July 1, 2014 0.6% Official annual projection
33  Algeria 38,700,000 January 1, 2014 0.54% Official estimate
34  Poland 38,496,000 December 31, 2013 0.54% Official estimate
35  Sudan 37,289,406 July 1, 2014 0.52% Official annual projection
36  Uganda 35,357,000 July 1, 2013 0.49% Annual official estimate
37  Canada 35,344,962 January 1, 2014 0.49% Official estimate
38  Iraq 34,035,000 July 1, 2012 0.48% Annual official estimate
39  Morocco 33,258,800 May 14, 2014 0.46% Official population clock
40  Peru 30,475,144 June 30, 2013 0.43% Annual official estimate
41  Uzbekistan 30,183,400 July 1, 2013 0.42% Official estimate
42  Malaysia 30,114,000 May 14, 2014 0.42% Official population clock
43  Saudi Arabia 29,994,272 July 1, 2013 0.42% Official estimate
44  Venezuela 28,946,101 October 30, 2011 0.4% Preliminary 2011 census result
45    Nepal 26,494,504 June 22, 2011 0.37% Final 2011 census result
46  Afghanistan 25,500,100 January 1, 2013 0.36% Official estimate
47  Yemen 25,235,000 July 1, 2013 0.35% Official estimate
48  North Korea 24,895,000 July 1, 2013 0.35% UN projection
49  Ghana 24,658,823 September 26, 2010 0.34% Final 2010 census result
50  Mozambique 23,700,715 July 1, 2012 0.33% Official estimate
51  Australia 23,489,400 May 14, 2014 0.328% Official population clock
52  Taiwan 23,382,948 April 30, 2014 0.33% Monthly official estimate
53  Ivory Coast 23,202,000 July 1, 2012 0.32% Official estimate
54  Syria 21,898,000 July 1, 2013 0.31% UN projection
55  Madagascar 21,263,403 July 1, 2012 0.3% Annual official estimate
56  Angola 20,609,294 July 1, 2012 0.29% Official estimate
57  Cameroon 20,386,799 July 1, 2012 0.28% Annual official estimate
58  Sri Lanka 20,277,597 March 21, 2012 0.28% Preliminary 2012 census result
59  Romania 20,121,641 October 20, 2011 0.28% Final 2011 census result
60  Chile 17,620,000 July 1, 2013 0.25% UN projection
61  Burkina Faso 17,322,796 July 1, 2013 0.24% Official estimate
62  Kazakhstan 17,221,000 April 1, 2014 0.24% Monthly official estimate
63  Niger 17,138,707 December 10, 2012 0.24% Preliminary 2012 census result
64  Netherlands 16,850,400 May 14, 2014 0.24% Official population clock
65  Malawi 16,363,000 July 1, 2013 0.23% UN projection
66  Guatemala 15,806,675 June 30, 2014 0.22% Official estimate
67  Ecuador 15,739,500 May 14, 2014 0.22% Official population clock
68  Mali 15,302,000 July 1, 2013 0.21% UN projection
69  Cambodia 15,135,000 July 1, 2013 0.21% UN projection
70  Zambia 14,580,290 July 1, 2013 0.2% Official estimate
71  Zimbabwe 13,061,239 August 17, 2012 0.18% 2012 Census Result
72  Senegal 12,873,601 November 19, 2013 0.18% Preliminary 2013 census result
73  Chad 12,825,000 July 1, 2013 0.18% UN projection
74  South Sudan 11,296,000 July 1, 2013 0.16% UN projection
75  Belgium 11,190,649 March 1, 2014 0.16% Monthly official estimate
76  Cuba 11,167,325 September 15, 2012 0.16% Preliminary 2012 census result
77  Tunisia 10,886,500 July 1, 2013 0.15% Official estimate
78  Guinea 10,824,200 July 1, 2010 0.15% Official estimate
79  Greece 10,815,197 May 24, 2011 0.15% Final 2011 census result
80  Rwanda 10,537,222 August 15, 2012 0.15% Preliminary 2012 census result
81  Czech Republic 10,512,400 December 31, 2013 0.15% Official quarterly estimate
82  Somalia 10,496,000 July 1, 2013 0.15% UN projection
83  Portugal 10,477,800 December 31, 2013 0.15% Annual official estimate
84  Haiti 10,413,211 July 1, 2012 0.15% Official estimate
85  Bolivia 10,027,254 November 21, 2012 0.14% 2012 census result
86  Benin 9,988,068 July 1, 2014 0.14% Official annual projection
87  Hungary 9,879,000 January 1, 2014 0.14% Annual official estimate
88  Sweden 9,666,871 March 31, 2014 0.13% Monthly official estimate
89  Azerbaijan 9,477,100 December 31, 2013 0.13% Official estimate
90  Belarus 9 467,000 April 1, 2014 0.13% Monthly official estimate
91  Dominican Republic 9,445,281 December 1, 2010 0.13% Final 2010 census result
92  Burundi 9,420,248 July 1, 2013 0.13% Official estimate
93  United Arab Emirates 9,346,000 July 1, 2013 0.13% UN projection
94  Honduras 8,555,072 July 1, 2013 0.12% Annual official estimate
95  Austria 8,504,850 January 1, 2014 0.12% Official quarterly estimate
96  Israel 8,169,700 March 31, 2014 0.11% Official Monthly Estimate
97  Tajikistan 8,160,000 January 1, 2014 0.11% Official estimate
98   Switzerland 8,136,700 December 31, 2013 0.11% Annual provisional figure
99  Papua New Guinea 7,398,500 July 1, 2013 0.103% Annual official estimate
100  Bulgaria 7,245,677 December 31, 2013 0.101% Official estimate
101  Hong Kong (China) 7,219,700 December 31, 2013 0.101% Official estimate
102  Serbia 7,181,505 January 1, 2013 0.1% Annual official estimate
103  Paraguay 6,783,374 2013 0.095% Official estimate
104  Jordan 6,582,890 May 14, 2014 0.0919% Official population clock
105  Laos 6,580,800 July 1, 2013 0.092% Annual official estimate
106  El Salvador 6,340,000 July 1, 2013 0.089% UN projection
107  Eritrea 6,333,000 July 1, 2013 0.088% UN projection
108  Libya 6,202,000 July 1, 2013 0.087% UN projection
109  Togo 6,191,155 November 6, 2010 0.086% Final 2010 census result
110  Sierra Leone 6,190,280 2013 0.086% Official estimate
111  Nicaragua 6,071,045 June 30, 2012 0.085% Official estimate
112  Kyrgyzstan 5,776,570 2014 0.081% Official estimate
113  Denmark 5,634,437 April 1, 2014 0.079% Quarterly official estimate
114  Finland 5,453,784 February 28, 2014 0.076% Monthly official estimate
115  Slovakia 5,415,949 December 31, 2013 0.076% Official estimate
116  Singapore 5,399,200 July 1, 2013 0.075% Official estimate
117  Turkmenistan 5,240,000 July 1, 2013 0.073% UN projection
118  Norway 5,109,056 January 1, 2014 0.071% Quarterly official estimate
119  Lebanon 4,822,000 July 1, 2013 0.067% UN projection
120  Costa Rica 4,667,096 July 1, 2013 0.065% Official estimate
121  Central African Republic 4,616,000 July 1, 2013 0.064% UN projection
122  Ireland 4,593,100 April 1, 2013 0.064% Annual official estimate
123  New Zealand 4,529,170 May 14, 2014 0.063% Official population clock
124  Georgia 4,490,500 January 1, 2014 0.063% Annual official estimate
125  Republic of the Congo 4,448,000 July 1, 2013 0.062% UN projection
126  Palestine 4,420,549 July 1, 2013 0.062% Official estimate
127  Liberia 4,294,000 July 1, 2013 0.06% UN projection
128  Croatia 4,290,612 March 31, 2011 0.114% 2011 census result
129  Moldova 4,062,800 January 1, 2014 0.05% Official estimate
130  Oman 4,018,000 April 30, 2014 0.056% Monthly official estimate
131  Bosnia and Herzegovina 3,791,622 October 15, 2013 0.053% Preliminary 2013 census result
132  Puerto Rico (USA) 3,615,086 July 1, 2013 0.05% Official estimate
133  Mauritania 3,461,041 July 1, 2013 0.048% Annual official estimate
134  Panama 3,405,813 May 16, 2010 0.048% Final 2010 census result
135  Uruguay 3,286,314 September 30, 2011 0.046% Final 2011 census result
136  Kuwait 3,065,850 July 1, 2011 0.043% Official estimate
137  Armenia 3,017,400 December 31, 2013 0.042% Quarterly official estimate
138  Lithuania 2,939,431 March 1, 2014 0.041% Monthly official estimate
139  Mongolia 2,931,300 December 31, 2013 0.041% Official preliminary result
140  Albania 2,821,977 October 1, 2011 0.039% 2011 census result
141  Jamaica 2,711,476 December 31, 2012 0.038% Annual official estimate
142  Qatar 2,155,446 April 30, 2014 0.301% Monthly official estimate
143  Namibia 2,113,077 August 28, 2011 0.03% Final 2011 census result
144  Lesotho 2,074,000 July 1, 2013 0.029% UN projection
145  Slovenia 2,062,601 May 14, 2014 0.029% Official population clock
146  Macedonia 2,062,294 December 31, 2012 0.029% Official estimate
147  Botswana 2,024,904 August 22, 2011 0.028% Final 2011 census result
148  Latvia 2,003,000 March 1, 2014 0.028% Monthly official estimate
149  Gambia 1,882,450 April 15, 2013 0.026% Preliminary 2013 census result
150  Kosovo 1,815,606 December 31, 2012 0.025% Official estimate
151  Guinea-Bissau 1,704,000 July 1, 2013 0.024% UN projection
152  Gabon 1,672,000 July 1, 2013 0.023% UN projection
153  Equatorial Guinea 1,622,000 July 1, 2010 0.023% Annual official estimate
154  Trinidad and Tobago 1,328,019 January 9, 2011 0.019% 2011 census result
155  Estonia 1,311,870 January 1, 2014 0.018% Official estimate
156  Mauritius 1,257,900 July 3, 2011 0.018% 2011 census result
157  Swaziland 1,250,000 July 1, 2013 0.017% UN projection
158  Bahrain 1,234,571 April 27, 2010 0.017% Final 2010 census result
159  Timor-Leste 1,066,409 July 11, 2010 0.015% Final 2010 census result
160  Djibouti 873,000 July 1, 2013 0.012% UN projection
161  Cyprus 865,878 December 31, 2012 0.012% Official estimate
162  Fiji 858,038 July 1, 2012 0.012% Annual official estimate
163  Réunion (France) 840,974 January 1, 2013 0.012% Official annual estimate
164  Guyana 784,894 July 1, 2010 0.011% Annual official estimate
165  Bhutan 747,290 May 14, 2014 0.0104% Official population clock
166  Comoros 743,798 July 1, 2013 0.0104% Official estimate
167  Montenegro 620,029 April 1, 2011 0.0087% Final 2011 census result
168  Macau (China) 607,500 December 31, 2013 0.0084% Official quaterly estimate
169  Solomon Islands 581,344 July 1, 2013 0.0081% Annual official estimate
170  Western Sahara 567,000 July 1, 2013 0.0079% UN projection
171  Luxembourg 549,700 December 31, 2013 0.0075% Annual official estimate
172  Suriname 534,189 August 13, 2012 0.0075% Preliminary 2012 census result
173  Cape Verde 491,875 June 16, 2010 0.0069% Final 2010 census result
174  Malta 416,055 November 20, 2011 0.0058% Preliminary 2011 census result
175  Guadeloupe (France) 405,739 January 1, 2013 0.0057% Official annual estimate
176  Brunei 393,162 June 20, 2011 0.0055% Preliminary 2011 census result
177  Martinique (France) 392,291 January 1, 2011 0.0055% Official annual estimate
178  Bahamas 351,461 May 3, 2010 0.0049% Final 2010 census result
179  Belize 349,728 July 1, 2013 0.0049% Official estimate
180  Iceland 326,340 March 31, 2014 0.0045% Quarterly official estimate
181  Maldives 317,280 July 1, 2010 0.0044% Official estimate
182  Barbados 285,000 July 1, 2013 0.004% Official estimate
183  French Polynesia (France) 268,270 August 22, 2012 0.0037% Preliminary 2012 census result
184  Vanuatu 264,652 July 1, 2013 0.0037% Annual official estimate
185  New Caledonia (France) 258,958 July 1, 2013 0.0036% Annual official estimate
186  French Guiana (France) 237,549 January 1, 2011 0.0033% Official annual estimate
187  Mayotte (France) 212,645 August 21, 2012 0.003% 2012 census result
188  Samoa 187,820 November 7, 2011 0.0026% Final 2011 census result
189  São Tomé and Príncipe 187,356 May 13, 2012 0.0026% 2012 census result
190  Saint Lucia 180,000 May 10, 2013 0.0025% Preliminary 2010 census result
191  Guam (USA) 159,358 April 1, 2010 0.0022% Final 2010 census result
192  Curaçao (Netherlands) 150,563 March 26, 2011 0.0021% 2011 census result
193  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 109,000 July 1, 2013 0.0015% UN projection
194  Kiribati 106,461 July 1, 2013 0.0015% Annual official estimate
195  United States Virgin Islands (USA) 106,405 April 1, 2010 0.0015% Final 2010 census result
196  Grenada 103,328 May 12, 2011 0.0014% 2011 census result
197  Tonga 103,036 November 30, 2011 0.0014% 2011 census result
198  Aruba (Netherlands) 101,484 September 29, 2010 0.0014% 2010 census result
199  Federated States of Micronesia 101,351 July 1, 2013 0.0014% Annual official estimate
200  Jersey (UK) 99,000 December 31, 2012 0.0014% 2011 census result
201  Seychelles 90,945 August 26, 2010 0.0013% Final 2010 census result
202  Antigua and Barbuda 86,295 May 27, 2011 0.0012% Preliminary 2011 census result
203  Isle of Man (UK) 84,497 March 27, 2011 0.0012% 2011 census result
204  Andorra 76,098 July 1, 2013 0.0011% Annual official estimate
205  Dominica 71,293 May 14, 2011 0.001% Preliminary 2011 census result
206  Bermuda (UK) 64,237 May 20, 2010 0.0009% Final 2010 census result
207  Guernsey (UK) 63,085 March 31, 2012 0.00088% Annual official estimate
208  Greenland (Denmark) 56,483 July 1, 2013 0.00079% Annual official estimate
209  Marshall Islands 56,086 July 1, 2013 0.00078% Annual official estimate
210  American Samoa (USA) 55,519 April 1, 2010 0.00078% Final 2010 census result
211  Cayman Islands (UK) 55,456 October 10, 2010 0.00077% Final 2010 census result
212  Saint Kitts and Nevis 54,000 July 1, 2013 0.00075% UN projection
213  Northern Mariana Islands (USA) 53,883 April 1, 2010 0.00075% Final 2010 census result
214  Faroe Islands (Denmark) 48,308 January 1, 2014 0.00067% Monthly official estimate
215  Sint Maarten (Netherlands) 37,429 January 1, 2010 0.00052% Official estimate
216  Liechtenstein 37,132 December 31, 2013 0.00052% Semi annual official estimate
217  Saint Martin (France) 36,979 January 1, 2010 0.00052% Official estimate
218  Monaco 36,950 December 31, 2013 0.0005% Annual official estimate
219  San Marino 32,646 March 31, 2014 0.00046% Monthly official estimate
220  Turks and Caicos Islands (UK) 31,458 January 25, 2012 0.00044% 2012 census result
221  Gibraltar (UK) 30,001 December 31, 2012 0.00042% Annual official estimate
222  British Virgin Islands (UK) 29,537 July 1, 2010 0.00041% Annual official estimate
223  Åland Islands (Finland) 28,502 December 31, 2012 0.0004% Official estimate
224  Caribbean Netherlands (Netherlands) 23,296 January 1, 2013 0.00033% Official estimate
225  Palau 20,901 July 1, 2013 0.00029% Annual official estimate
226  Cook Islands (NZ) 14,974 December 1, 2011 0.00021% Final 2011 census result
227  Anguilla (UK) 13,452 May 11, 2011 0.00019% Preliminary 2011 census result
228  Wallis and Futuna (France) 13,135 July 1, 2013 0.00018% Annual official estimate
229  Tuvalu 11,323 July 1, 2013 0.00016% Annual official estimate
230  Nauru 9,945 October 30, 2011 0.00014% 2011 census result
231  Saint Barthélemy (France) 8,938 January 1, 2010 0.00012% Official estimate
232  Saint Pierre and Miquelon (France) 6,081 January 1, 2010 0.000085% Official estimate
233  Montserrat (UK) 4,922 May 12, 2011 0.000069% 2011 census result
234  Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha (UK) 4,000 July 1, 2013 0.000056% UN projection
235  Falkland Islands (UK) 3,000 July 1, 2013 0.000042% UN projection
236  Svalbard and Jan Mayen (Norway) 2,655 September 1, 2012 0.000037% Official estimate
237  Norfolk Island (Australia) 2,302 August 9, 2011 0.000032% 2011 census result
238  Christmas Island (Australia) 2,072 August 9, 2011 0.000029% 2011 census result
239  Niue (NZ) 1,613 September 10, 2011 0.000023% Final 2011 census result
240  Tokelau (NZ) 1,411 October 18, 2011 0.000020% Final 2011 census result
241   Vatican City 839 July 1, 2012 0.000012% Official estimate
242  Cocos (Keeling) Islands (Australia) 596 January 14, 2014 0.0000083% 2011 census result
243  Pitcairn Islands (UK) 56 February 1, 2013 0.00000078% Official estimate

Know : 10 Quick Facts Water

Beautiful-Water

  1. When ground water is contaminated it may remain that way for several thousand years.

  2. Human blood is 83% water.  Human bones are 25% water.

  3. Salt water is 97% of water on earth.  Three percent is fresh water.   Most of the freshwater stored on the earth is frozen in glaciers.

  4. Each day the sun evaporates 1,000,000,000,000 (one trillion) tons of water.

  5. The earth’s surface is about 80% water.  That is about 320,000,000,000,000 (363 trillion) gallons of water.

  6. In some deserts, rain is so uncommon that the natives to not have a word for it.

  7. Heating water is the second largest energy user in the home.

  8. In some countries the law requires solar heating of water for domestic uses.

  9. In one glass of water, there are about 8,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (8 septillion water molecules.)

  10. In a one hundred year period, a water molecule spends 98 years in the ocean, 20 months as ice, about 2 weeks in lakes and rivers, and less than a week in the atmosphere.

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Courtesy : www.waterbank.com

Know : National Anthem | Afghanistan

600px-Flag_of_Afghanistan.svgThe Afghan National Anthem (Pashto: ملی سرود‎ – Milli Surood; Persian: سرود ملی‎ – “Surūd-e Millī”) was adopted and officially announced by a Loya Jirga in May 2006. According to article 20 of the Afghan Constitution, the national anthem shall be in Pashto with the mention of “God is Greatest” as well as the names of the various tribes of Afghanistan. The lyrics were written by Abdul Bari Jahani and the music was written by German-Afghan composer Babrak Wassa (de)

Milli Surood
Original Pashto Lyrics Pashto Transliteration Dari Translation Dari Transliteration English Translation
First stanza
دا وطن افغانستان دی
دا عزت د هر افغان دی
کور د سولې، کور د تورې
هر بچی يې قهرمان دی
Dā watan Afğānistān di
Dā izat da har Afğān di
Kor da sole, kor da tūre
Har bačay ye qahramān di
این وطن افغانستان است
این عزت هر افغان است
میهن صلح، جایگاه شمشیر
هر فرزندش قهرمان است
īn watan Afğānestān ast
īn ezat-e har Afğān ast
mīhan-e solh, jāygāh-e šamšīr
har farzandeš qahramān ast
This land is Afghanistan!
It is the pride of every Afghan.
The land of peace, the land of the sword.
Its sons are all brave.
Second stanza
دا وطن د ټولو کور دی
د بلوڅو، د ازبکو
د پښتون او هزاره وو
د ترکمنو، د تاجکو
Dā watan da ṭolo kor di
Da Balotso, da Uzbəko
Da Pax̌tūn aw Hazārawo
Da Turkməno, da Tājəko
این وطن میهن همه است
از بلوچ، از ازبکها
از پشتون، هزاره‌ها
از ترکمن و تاجیکها
īn watan mīhan-e hame ast
az Baloč, az Uzbakhā
az Paštūn, Hazārahā
az Turkman o Tājīkhā
This is the country of every tribe,
The land of Baloch andUzbeks,
Pashtuns and Hazaras,
Turkmen and Tajiks.
Third stanza
ور سره عرب، ګوجر دي
پاميريان، نورستانيان
براهوي دي، قزلباش دي
هم ايماق، هم پشه يان
Wər sara Arab, Gūjər dī
Pāmīryān, Nūristānyān
Brāhawī dī, Qizilbāš dī
Ham Aymāq, ham Pašayān
هم عرب و گوجرها
پامیری‌، نورستانیها
براهویی است و قزلباش
هم ایماق و پشه‌ئیان
ham Arab o Gūjarhā
Pāmīrī, Nūristānīhā
Brāhawī ast o Qizilbāš
ham Aymāq o Pašaiyān
With them, Arabs andGujjars,
PamirisNuristanis,
Brahuis and Qizilbash,
Also Aimaqs andPashayis.
Fourth stanza
دا هيواد به تل ځلېږي
لکه لمر پر شنه اسمان
په سينه کې د آسيا به
لکه زړه وي جاويدان
Dā hīwād ba təl źaleǵī
Ləka lmar pər šnə asmān
Pə sīna ke da Āsyā ba
Ləka zṛə wī jāwīdān
این کشور همیشه تابان خواهد بود
مثل آفتاب در آسمان کبود
در سینهٔ آسیا
مثل قلب جاویدان
īn kešwar hamīše tābān xāhad būd
mesl-e āftāb dar āsemān-e kabūd
dar sīna-ye āsyā
mesl-e qalb jāwīdān
This Land will shine for ever,
Like the sun in the blue sky.
In the chest of Asia,
It will remain as the heart forever.
Fifth stanza
نوم د حق مو دی رهبر
وايو الله اکبر
وايو الله اکبر
وايو الله اکبر
Nūm da haq mo day rahbar
Wāyū Allāhu Akbar
Wāyū Allāhu Akbar
Wāyū Allāhu Akbar
نام حق است ما را رهبر
می‌گوییم الله اکبر
می‌گوییم الله اکبر
می‌گوییم الله اکبر
nām-e haq ast mā rā rahbar
mīgūyīm Allāh-o-Akbar
mīgūyīm Allāh-o-Akbar
mīgūyīm Allāh-o-Akbar
We will follow the one God;
We all say, Allah is great!
We all say, Allah is great!

____

NOTE: National Anthems of various Countries are presented here (on alphabetical order) for educational purposes only with a good intention to spread peace and harmony among nations and mutually respecting one another. In no way the comments should hurt the other country’s sentiments and patriotism. Every Country has its own national pride. Let us value it.

Source and Courtesy: Wikipedia and YouTube

Know : Intergovernmental Organizations

world_flagsAn intergovernmental organization (or international governmental organizationIGO) is an organization composed primarily of sovereign states (referred to as member states), or of other intergovernmental organizations. Intergovernmental organizations are often called international organizations, although that term may also include international nongovernmental organization such as international nonprofit organizations or multinational corporations.

Intergovernmental organizations are an important aspect of public international law. IGOs are established by treaty that acts as a charter creating the group. Treaties are formed when lawful representatives (governments) of several states go through a ratification process, providing the IGO with an international legal personality.

Intergovernmental organizations in a legal sense should be distinguished from simple groupings or coalitions of states, such as the G8 or the Quartet. Such groups or associations have not been founded by a constituent document and exist only as task groups.

Intergovernmental organizations must also be distinguished from treaties. Many treaties (such as the North American Free Trade Agreement, or the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade before the establishment of the World Trade Organization) do not establish an organization and instead rely purely on the parties in their administration, becoming legally recognized as an ad hoc commission. Other treaties have established an administrative apparatus which was not deemed to have been granted international legal personality.

Types and Purposes

Intergovernmental organizations differ in function, membership and membership criteria. They have various goals and scopes, often outlined in the treaty or charter. Some IGOs developed to fulfill a need for a neutral forum for debate or negotiation to resolve disputes. Others developed to carry out mutual interests with unified aims to preserve peace through conflict resolution and better international relations, promote international cooperation on matters such as environmental protection, to promote human rights, to promote social development (education, health care), to render humanitarian aid, and to economic development. Some are more general in scope (the United Nations) while others may have subject-specific missions (such as Interpol or the International Organization for Standardization and other standards organizations). Common types include:

Worldwide or global organizations – generally open to nations worldwide as long as certain criteria are met. This category includes the United Nations (UN) and its specialized agencies, the Universal Postal UnionInterpol, the World Trade Organization (WTO), the World Customs Organization (WCO), World Nature Organization (WNO), and the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

Regional organizations – open to members from a particular region or continent of the world. This category includes the Council of Europe (CoE), European Union(EU), NATOOrganization for Security and Co-operation in EuropeAfrican Union (AU), Organization of American States (OAS), Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), Arab League, and Union of South American Nations.

Cultural, linguistic, ethnic, religious, or historical organizations – open to members based on some cultural, linguistic, ethnic, religious, or historical link. Examples include the Commonwealth of NationsOrganisation internationale de la FrancophonieCommunity of Portuguese Language CountriesLatin UnionTurkic Council,International Organization of Turkic Culture, or Organisation of Islamic Cooperation

Economic organizations – based on economic organization. Some are dedicated to free trade, the reduction of trade barriers (the World Trade Organization) and International Monetary Fund. Others are focused on international development. International cartels, such as OPEC, also exist. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development was founded as an economics-focused organization. An example of a recently formed economic IGO is the Bank of the South.

Educational organizations – centered around tertiary level studyAcademy of European Law offers training in European law to lawyers, judges, barristers, solicitors, in-house counsel and academics. EUCLID (university) chartered as a university and umbrella organization dedicated to sustainable development in signatory countries and United Nations University efforts to resolve the pressing global problems that are the concern of the United Nations, its Peoples and Member States.
Health and Population Organizations- based on the common perceived health and population goals and to address those challenges collectively. An example is the intergovernmental partnership for population and development”Partners in Population and Development

Some organizations, such as NATO, have collective security or mutual defense provisions.

The Union of International Associations publishes an annual directory of organizations and provides ancillary information on most international organizations, both intergovernmental and non-governmental.

Participation and involvement

There are several different reasons a state may choose membership in an intergovernmental organization. But there are also reasons membership may be rejected. These reasons are explored in the sections below.

Reasons for participation:

  1. Economic rewards: In the case of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), many different countries receive economic benefits from membership in the free trade agreement. For example, Mexican companies are given better access to U.S. markets due to their membership.
  2. Political influence: Smaller countries, such as Portugal and the Netherlands, who do not carry much political clout on the international stage, are given a substantial increase in influence through membership in IGOs, such as the European Union. Also for countries with more influence such as France and Germany they are beneficial as the nation increases influence in the smaller countries’ internal affairs and expanding other nation’s dependence on themselves, so to preserve allegiance
  3. Security: Membership in an IGO such as NATO gives security benefits to member countries. This provides an arena where political differences can be resolved.
  4. Improve democracy and the likelihood of democratic survival: It has been noted that member countries experience a greater degree of democracy and those democracies survive longer.

Reasons for rejecting membership:

  1. Loss of sovereignty: Membership often comes with a loss of state sovereignty as treaties are signed which require cooperation on the part of all member states.
  2. Insufficient benefits: Often membership does not bring about substantial enough benefits to warrant membership in the organization.

Privileges and immunities

Intergovernmental organizations are provided with privileges and immunities that are intended to ensure their independence and effective functioning. They are specified in the treaties that give rise to the organization (such as the Convention on the Privileges and Immunities of the United Nations and the Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Criminal Court), which are normally supplemented by further multinational agreements and national regulations (for example the International Organizations Immunities Act in the United States). The organizations are thereby immune from the jurisdiction of national courts.

Rather than by national jurisdiction, legal accountability is intended to be ensured by legal mechanisms that are internal to the intergovernmental organization itself and access to administrative tribunals. In the course of many court cases where private parties tried to pursue claims against international organizations, there has been a gradual realization that alternate means of dispute settlement are required, as states have fundamental human rights obligations to provide plaintiffs with access to court in view of their right to a fair trial. Otherwise, the organizations’ immunities may be put in question in national and international courts. Some organizations hold proceedings before tribunals relating to their organization to be confidential, and in some instances have threatened disciplinary action should an employee disclose any of the relevant information. Such confidentiality has been criticized as a lack of transparency.

The immunities also extend to employment law. In this regard, immunity from national jurisdiction necessitates that reasonable alternative means are available to effectively protect employees’ rights; in this context, a first instance Dutch court considered an estimated duration of proceedings before the Administrative Tribunal of the International Labour Organisation of 15 years to be too long.

Strengths and weaknesses

These are some of the strengths and weaknesses of IGOs:

Strengths:

  1. They hold state authority.
  2. Their institutions are permanent.
  3. They provide a forum for discussion.
  4. They are issue specific.
  5. They provide information.
  6. They allow multilateral cooperation.

Weaknesses:

  1. Membership is limited. Prohibits the membership of private citizens. This makes IGOs undemocratic. In addition, not all IGOs allow universal membership.
  2. IGOs often overlap resulting in a complex network.
  3. States have to give up part of their sovereignty, which weakens the state’s ability to assert its authority.
  4. Inequality among state members creates biases and can lead powerful states to misuse these organizations.

They can be deemed unfair as countries with a higher percentage voting power have the right to veto any decision that is not in their favor, leaving the smaller countries powerless.


Source and Courtesy :Wikipedia