Know : 22 Reasons : Why We Need Trees?

Trees combat the climate change

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Excess carbon dioxide (CO2) caused by many factors is a building up in our atmosphere and contributing to climate change. Trees absorb CO2, removing and storing the carbon while releasing the oxygen back into the air. In one year, an acre of mature trees absorbs the amount of CO2 produced when you drive your car 26,000 miles.

Trees clean the air

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Trees absorb odors and pollutant gases (nitrogen oxides, ammonia, sulfur dioxide and ozone) and filter particulates out of the air by trapping them on their leaves and bark.

Trees provide oxygen

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In one year an acre of mature trees can provide enough oxygen for 18 people.

Trees cool the streets and the city

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Average temperatures in Los Angeles have risen 6°F in the last 50 years as tree coverage has declined and the number of heat-absorbing roads and buildings has increased.
Trees cool the city by up to 10°F, by shading our homes and streets, breaking up urban “heat islands” and releasing water vapor into the air through their leaves.

Trees conserve energy

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Three trees placed strategically around a single-family home can cut summer air conditioning needs by up to 50 percent. By reducing the energy demand for cooling our houses, we reduce carbon dioxide and other pollution emissions from power plants.

Trees save water

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Shade from trees slows water evaporation from thirsty lawns. Most newly planted trees need only fifteen gallons of water a week. As trees transpire, they increase atmospheric moisture.

Trees help prevent water pollution

Trees cleans water

Trees reduce runoff by breaking rainfall thus allowing the water to flow down the trunk and into the earth below the tree. This prevents stormwater from carrying pollutants to the ocean. When mulched, trees act like a sponge that filters this water naturally and uses it to recharge groundwater supplies.

Trees help prevent soil erosion

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On hillsides or stream slopes, trees slow runoff and hold soil in place.

Trees shield children from ultra-violet rays

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. Trees reduce UV-B exposure by about 50 percent, thus providing protection to children on school campuses and playgrounds – where children spend hours outdoors.

Trees provide food

Governor's plum

Governor’s plum

An apple tree can yield up to 15-20 bushels of fruit per year and can be planted on the tiniest urban lot. Aside from fruit for humans, trees provide food for birds and wildlife.

Trees heal

Tree heals

Studies have shown that patients with views of trees out their windows heal faster and with less complications. Children with ADHD show fewer symptoms when they have access to nature. Exposure to trees and nature aids concentration by reducing mental fatigue.

Trees reduce violence

Tree reduces violence

Neighborhoods and homes that are barren have shown to have a greater incidence of violence in and out of the home than their greener counterparts. Trees and landscaping help to reduce the level of fear.

Trees mark the seasons

Trees Animated seasons

Is it winter, spring, summer or fall? Look at the trees.

Trees create economic opportunities

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Fruit harvested from community orchards can be sold, thus providing income. Small business opportunities in green waste management and landscaping arise when cities value mulching and its water-saving qualities. Vocational training for youth interested in green jobs is also a great way to develop economic opportunities from trees.

Trees are teachers and playmates

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Whether as houses for children or creative and spiritual inspiration for adults, trees have provided the space for human retreat throughout the ages.

Trees bring diverse groups of people together

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Tree plantings provide an opportunity for community involvement and empowerment that improves the quality of life in our neighborhoods. All cultures, ages, and genders have an important role to play at a tree planting or tree care event.

Trees add unity

People sitting under a tree in Placa de Santa Maria, Puigcerda, Sunday morning, August 2011

Trees as landmarks can give a neighborhood a new identity and encourage civic pride.

Trees provide a canopy and habitat for wildlife

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Sycamore and oak are among the many urban species that provide excellent urban homes for birds, bees, possums and squirrels.

Trees block things

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Trees can mask concrete walls or parking lots, and unsightly views. They muffle sound from nearby streets and freeways, and create an eye-soothing canopy of green. Trees absorb dust and wind and reduce glare.

Trees provide wood

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In suburban and rural areas, trees can be selectively harvested for fuel and craft wood.

Trees increase property values

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The beauty of a well-planted property and its surrounding street and neighborhood can raise property values by as much as 15 percent.

Trees increase business traffic

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Studies show that the more trees and landscaping a business district has, the more business will flow in. A tree-lined street will also slow traffic – enough to allow the drivers to look at the store fronts instead of whizzing by.


Courtesy: The Tree People


Earth Our Home Too : Meerkats

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Meerkat Classification and Evolution
The Meerkat (also known as the Suricate) is a small species of foraging mammal that is found inhabiting the harsh conditions of the open and arid, semi-desert plains in southern Africa. A member of the Mongoose family, Meerkats differ from the other 35 Mongoose species in a number of ways with the biggest difference being that Meerkats are incredibly sociable animals, where most Mongooses are not (only 3 other species are known to live in groups larger than pairs). There are three different sub-species of Meerkat that are found in varying geographic locations and although they are very similar in appearance, they differ slightly in their fur colouration and markings. All however, live in highly organised communities known as gangs or bands, that rely on one another for their survival in such hostile conditions as whilst the majority of the group is out foraging for food, others stand on guard to keep a watchful eye out for approaching predators.

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Meerkat Anatomy and Appearance
The Meerkat is a small sized mammal that has a long and slender body with a long and light but black-tipped tail that can almost double the animal’s total length. Meerkats are sandy to light brown in colour with eight darker stripes on their back, markings on their sides (which are unique to the individual) and a lighter face and underside. They have elongated muzzles with a black nose and dark coloured bands around their eyes. Meerkats have long, sharp claws on their front paws that are curved and can grow up to 2cm long and help them to both dig their burrows and to find small animals that are buried beneath the soft sand. The fur of the Meerkat has actually adapted remarkably to the differing desert conditions, not only helping to keep the animal cool during the boiling hot days, but also acting as a layer of insulation to keep it warm during the freezing-cold winter nights.

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Meerkat Distribution and Habitat
The Meerkat is found in southern and western Africa inhabiting the dry and hostile scrub-lands of the Kalahari Desert. Spanning across five different countries in southern Africa from Angola to South Africa, Meerkats are found throughout this vast, arid region foraging for food on the ground during the day and retiring into their immense burrows in the sand at night. Conditions in the Kalahari Desert are incredibly extreme with temperatures reaching up to 40 degrees Centigrade in the summer (with a sand temperature of 70 degrees), and falling to well below zero down to -10 degrees during the bitter, winter nights. This area of Africa has an incredibly low level of annual rainfall with only a rare, small amount falling generally between January and April and after which, the Kalahari briefly transforms into a well-vegetated and life-filled region before the cooler winter months set in.

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Meerkat Behaviour and Lifestyle
Unlike all but three other Mongoose species, the Meerkat is a highly sociable animal that inhabits territories in the desert in groups that usually contain between 10 and 30 individuals (although much larger bands are not uncommon in areas where there is an ample supply of food), and consist of three or four family units of a male and female pair, with their young. After emerging from their burrow to sunbathe in the early morning sun, the majority of the band goes off to forage for food while others either babysit the young, or act as guards. By standing upright on their hind legs and tails on the top of mounds and in bushes, Meerkat guards are able to have a good vantage point to watch out for approaching predators, particularly from the sky. One of a series of different alarm calls will then be sounded to alert the rest of the group what the danger is, often causing the whole band to dive into their underground burrow to hide.

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Meerkat Reproduction and Life Cycles
Although there may be a number of breeding pairs in one band, Meerkat society is generally dominated by one male and female pair. Young Meerkats are usually born in November after a gestation period that lasts for around 11 weeks. Having mated with her partner at the start of the summer, the female Meerkat gives birth to between 2 and 5 small kits in a grass-lined chamber in the burrow, that are born blind and without their full coat of fur. Unlike with the rearing of numerous other small mammal species, both females and males tend to their young with males and siblings known to help to teach the young Meerkats the skills of surviving in the surrounding desert. Whilst the majority of the band is out foraging for food, the young Meerkats never stray far from the den and whilst playing in the hot sand, are kept a watchful eye on by an appointed babysitter. Meerkats can live for up to 10 years in the wild but have been known to live for longer in captivity.

Meerkats (1)

Meerkat Diet and Prey
The Meerkat is a carnivorous animal which means that despite it’s small size, it only forages for and eats small animals in order to gain all of the nutrition (and most of the moisture) that is needs to survive. Like other Mongoose species, Meerkats have an excellent sense of smell which is used to sniff out potentialprey that is lurking just under the surface of the sand. Once detected, Meerkats then used their long and sharp front claws to dig out their prey, with the majority of their diet being made up of insects and other small invertebrates, along with also eating larger animals such as Lizards and Rodents. Due to the fact that Meerkats are small in size and have adapted to living in such a harsh environment, they must spend a great deal of their waking hours foraging for food as they are known to loose around 5% of their body-weight during the night and must therefore ensure that they have enough to eat every day.

meerkat and snake

Meerkat Predators and Threats
Due to the small size of the Meerkat, they are natural prey to numerous animal species that are both on the ground and in the air. The biggest threat to Meerkats are Birds of Prey such as Hawks and Eagles that can spot these animals from high above their heads, along with ground-dwelling predators such as Snakes that hunt them on the ground. In order to try and protect themselves from being so vulnerable in their open and arid surroundings, Meerkats adopt the safety in numbers tactic and ensure that there is always an individual on guard to warn the rest of the group of any approaching danger. In places that are closer to growing Human settlements and near to areas where domestic animals are grazed, Meerkats have been known to contract both bovine diseases and rabies that can affect whole populations of these adaptable and otherwise resilient animals.

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Meerkat Interesting Facts and Features
If the individual Meerkat on guard spots approaching danger they will sound the alarm to the rest of the group. Meerkats are known to use a wide range of vocal calls to communicate between one another sounding long howls to warn the rest of the band of an approaching bird of prey, and using short double-barks to alert them of a predator nearing the group on the ground. The individual territory of a Meerkat group covers a large enough area to ensure that the band has everything they need to most successfully survive. This includes areas of both hard and soft sand as although the hard sand provides the perfect ground for building their tunnels in, it requires more energy for Meerkats to forage for food in it too. Digging in the softer sand requires less effort and therefore means that they can conserve more energy for other activities.

Meerkat Relationship with Humans
The Meerkat is one of those species that has always fascinated people with their characteristic behaviours having made them one of Africa’s most iconic small mammal species. The real delights into Meerkat life were displayed in the BBC series Meerkat Manor which involved the following and filming of one band of Meerkats in the Kalahari Desert. Although they are not threatened by Human activity as drastically as a number of Africa’s other unique species, Meerkats have been susceptible to contracting diseases from other animals which can have devastating implications on local populations.

Meerkat Conservation Status and Life Today
Today, the Meerkat is an animal that listed by the IUCN as being of Least Concern from being extinct in it’s natural environment in the near future. Although they are widespread and common throughout much of their natural range, populations in certain areas can be affected by the lack of rainfall or increasing numbers of their natural predators. Populations across southern Africa however, appear to be generally stable with large numbers of Meerkats also found in a few of the big national parks.


Courtesy  : a-z-animals.com, Will Burrad-Lucas (via Google), Wikipedia

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Ecological Preservation : A New Interactive map of Deforestation

A new global map of deforestation reveals that 888,000 square miles (2.3 million square kilometers) of forest have vanished since 2000.

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Click here to view the interactive map

The interactive map (viewable online Click here) is based on satellite data and is the first of its kind. The calculations are accurate down to about 100 feet (30 meters), enough detail to provide useful local information while still covering the whole globe.
The map covers the time frame from 2000 to 2012, and includes both forest losses and forest gains. During that time, 309,000 square miles (800,000 square km) of new forests were gained. Of the 888,000 square miles lost and 309,000 square miles gained, about 77,000 square miles (200,000 square km) were areas that were lost between 2000 and 2012 and then re-established.

The rest of the loss and gain occur in tandem all over the globe. For example, Brazil’s efforts to slow deforestation have paid off, with about 500 square miles (1,300 square km) less loss each year. But the rest of the tropics more than made up for Brazil’s improvements with rapidly increasing losses.

Indonesia saw the fastest increases in deforestation. Before 2003, the country lost less than 4,000 square miles (10,000 square km) per year. By 2011, more than 7,700 square miles (20,000 square km) of Indonesian forests vanished each year

– Source and Courtesy – Excerpts from Discovery News

6 Pics for the 6th Sense : Hicory Ticory Dock, Little Jumbo on a Walk :)

Welcome to our Home :)

Welcome to our Home 🙂

Hicory Ticory Dock... Little Jumbo on a walk.. Hicory ticory dock

Hicory Ticory Dock… Little Jumbo on a walk.. Hicory ticory dock..

Hey Stop there Humo'n Poachers!  you are no welcomedd! This is my Dadda's Territory

Hey Stop there Humo’n Poachers! you are no welcomedd! This is my Dadda’s Territory

Hey! You all can come in Littley fellas,  my brother wont harm you :)

Hey! You all can come in Littley fellas, my brother wont harm you 🙂

Aahoy! This is fun, Anybody like to join me! huh? :)

Aahoy! This is fun, Anybody like to join me! huh? 🙂

Save Elephants! Leave forests for them. It's their home.

Save Elephants! Leave forests for them. It’s their home.

– Share this with your friends now use the social buttons below 🙂 

Our sincere courtesy to the original photographers who captured these lovely images and the copyrights belongs to the respective photographers / people.

What is Carbon Dioxide? – Is Carbon Dioxide Poisonous? – Carbon Dioxide Toxicity –

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Thanks “Forest of Peace” for sharing this eye opening article…