Know : List of Foods’ Storage Periods

 

Food-storage-shelf-items

Proper food storage helps maintain food quality by retaining flavor, color, texture and nutrients, while reducing the chance of contracting a food-borne illness. Foods can be classified into three groups.

  • Perishable foods include meat, poultry, fish, milk, eggs and many raw fruits and vegetables. All cooked foods are considered perishable foods. To store these foods for any length of time, perishable foods need to be held at refrigerator or freezer temperatures. If refrigerated, perishable foods should be used within several days.
  • Semi-perishable foods, if properly stored and handled, may remain unspoiled for six months to about one year. Flour, grain products, dried fruits and dry mixes are considered semi-perishable.
  • Staple, or non-perishable, foods such as sugar, dried beans, spices and canned goods do not spoil unless they are handled carelessly. These foods will lose quality, however, if stored over a long time, even if stored under ideal conditions.

There is no exact method to determine how long a food will maintain quality and be safe to eat, because many conditions affect the quality. The storage life of foods is affected by the:

  • freshness of the food when it reached the grocery store
  • length of time and the temperature at which it was held before purchase
  • temperature of your food storage areas
  • humidity level in your food storage areas
  • type of storage container or packaging the food is stored in
  • characteristics of the food item

 

Storage Periods for Retaining Food Quality
Food Room Temperature Refrigerator Freezer at 0°F
Milk/Milk Products
Milk 1 week 1 month
Butter 2 weeks 12 months
Canned or dry milk (unopened) 6 months
Cottage cheese 1 week 3 months
Cream 1-2 weeks
Ice cream 2-3 weeks
Margarine 1 month 12 months
Natural cheese 1 month 4-6 months
Processed cheese 1 month 4-6 months
Sour cream, buttermilk, cream cheese 2 weeks Not recommended
Yogurt 1 month
Meat
Fresh roasts, steaks, chops 3-4 days 2-3 months
Fresh livers, hearts, kidneys, other variety meats 1-2 days 3-4 months
Fresh ground meat, stew meat 1-2 days 3-4 months
Cured pork and lunch meat 1 week Not recommended
Cooked meat, gravies made with meat stock 2-3 days 2-3 months
Canned meat 1 year
Meat pies, stews, casseroles, meat salads 2-3 days 3 months
Hotdogs 1 week (opened) 2 weeks (unopened) 1-2 months
Bacon 7 days 1 month
Sausage, raw from pork, beef, turkey 1-2 days 1-2 months
Hard sausage-pepperoni, jerky sticks 2-3 weeks 1-2 months
Poultry/Eggs
Fresh poultry 2 days 6-8 months
Cooked poultry 2-3 days 6 months
Poultry stuffing 1 day
Poultry pies, stews, creamed dishes, gravies 1 day 6 months
Poultry salads 1 day
Eggs 2-4 weeks 1 year
Raw yolk, whites 2-4 days 1 year
Hardcooked eggs 1 week Not recommended
Liquid pasteurized eggs or egg substitutes 10 days (unopened) 3 days (opened) 1 year (unopened)
Egg-containing products: custards, custard sauces, puddings, custard-filled pastries or cakes 1-2 days Not recommended
Puddings, canned 1-2 days (opened)
Fish/Seafood
Fresh fish 1-2 days 3-6 months
Cooked fish 3-4 days 1 month
Fish salad 1 day
Smoked fish 10 days 4-5 weeks
Canned fish 1 year Not recommended
Dried or pickled fish 3-4 weeks
Clams, oyster (shucked) and scallops 7-9 days
Crab 7 days 2 months
Shrimp 3-5 days 6-12 months
Lobster (shelled or unshelled) 3-7 days 6-12 months
Wild Game
Venison 3-5 days 3-4 months
Rabbit, squirrel 1-2 days 12 months
Wild duck, pheasant, goose(whole) 1-2 days 6 months
Fruits
Apples Until ripe 1 month
Citrus fruits 2-6 weeks
Grapes 1-3 weeks
Melons, most varieties 1 week
Peaches, nectarines 2-3 weeks
Pears (mature but not fully ripe) 1-3 months
Pineapple, ripe 1 week
Other fresh fruit Until ripe 3-5 days 9-12 months
Canned fruit 1 year 2-4 days (opened)
Dried fruit 6 months 2-4 days (cooked)
Fruit juice concentrates 1 year
Canned fruit juices 1 year 3-4 days (opened)
Vegetables
Asparagus 2-3 days
Broccoli, brussels sprouts, green peas, green onions, lima beans, rhubarb, greens, summer squash, mushrooms 3-5 days
Cabbage, cauliflower, celery, cucumbers, snap beans, lettuce, peppers, tomatoes 1 week
Carrots, beets, parsnips, radishes, turnips 2 weeks
Corn 1 day
White potatoes, sweet potatoes, winter squash, rutabagas, dry onions 1 week (several months at 50-60°F)
Canned or dried vegetables 1 year 1-4 days (opened/cooked)
Cereal Products
Flour, white 1 year
Flour, whole or wheat 6-8 months 1 year
Rice, white 2 years
Rice, brown 6 months
Ready-to-eat cereals 1 year
Uncooked cereals 1 year
Pasta 1 year
Corn meal 1 year
Bakery Goods
Breads, baked with no preservatives 2-3 weeks 2-3 months
Breads, quick, baked 2 months
Cake, angel 6-12 months
Cake, baked, frosted 1 month
Cake, baked, unfrosted 2-4 months
Cakes, batter 1 month
Cakes, fruit 6-12 months
Cinnamon rolls, partially baked 2 months
Cookies, baked, homemade 2-3 weeks 6-12 months
Cookies, dough 1-2 days 3 months
Cookies, packaged 2 months 12-18 months
Crackers 2 months
Doughnuts, unfrosted 2-4 months
Muffins, baked 6-12 months
Pies, fruit 2-3 days (baked) 1-2 days (unbaked) 6-8 months (baked) 2-4 months (unbaked)
Pies, pumpkin or chiffon 2-3 days 1-2 months
Rolls and bread, unbaked 2-3 weeks 1 month
Waffles 1 month
Mixes/Packaged Foods
Biscuit, brownie, muffin mix 9 months
Cake mixes 6-9 months
Casserole mix 9-12 months
Cookies, homemade 2-3 weeks
Cookies, packaged 2 months
Crackers 3 months
Croutons and bread crumbs 6 months 6 months 1 year
Frosting, canned 3 months
Frosting, mix 8 months
Hot roll mix 18 months
Pancake mix 6-9 months
Piecrust, mix 6-9 months
Potatoes, instant 6-12 months
Rice mixes 6 months
Sauce and gravy mixes 6-12 months
Soup mixes 12 months
Toaster pastries 2-3 months
Other Foods
Baking powder 18 months
Baking soda 2 years
Chocolate syrup 2 years (unopened) 6 months (opened)
Cocoa mixes 8 months
Coffee, lighteners (dry) 9 months (unopened) 6 months (opened)
Cornstarch 18 months
Gelatin 18 months
Pectin 1 year
Salad dressings, bottled 12 months (unopened) 1-3 months (opened) Not recommended
Sugar, brown 18 months
Sugar, confectioners’ 18 months
Sugar, granulated 2 years
Vinegar 2 years (unopened) 1 year (opened)
Cheese, parmesan, grated 10 months (unopened) 2 months (opened)
Coconut, shredded 12 months (unopened) 6 months (opened)
Imitation bacon bits, etc. 4 months
Peas, beans, dried 12 months
Popcorn 2 years
Whipped topping, dry 12 months
Yeast, dry Expiration date on package
Honey, jams, syrups, molasses 1 year
Nuts, unshelled 6 months
Nuts, shelled 6 months
Peanut butter 6 months (unopened) 2 months (opened)
Chocolate 1 year
Coffee 1 year (unopened) 2-4 weeks (opened)
Coffee, instant 6 months (unopened) 2 months (opened)
Pudding mixes 1 year
Shortening, solid 8 months
Vegetable oils 1-3 months
Tea, bags or loose 1 year
Tea, instant 1 year
Soft drinks 3 months
Bouillon products 1 year
Mayonnaise 10-12 weeks Not recommended
Spices, Herbs, Condiments, Extracts
Catsup, chili sauce 12 months (unopened) 1 month (opened)
Mustard, prepared yellow (refrigerate 2 years (unopened) for longer storage) 6-8 months (opened)
Spices, whole 1-2 years
Spices, ground 6 months
Herbs 6 months
Herb/spice blends 2 years (unopened) 12 months (opened)
Other extracts 12 months

Exclusive Cupboard Storage Chart
• Store foods in cool cabinets and away from appliances which produce heat.
• Many staples and canned foods have a relatively long shelf life, but buy only what you can expect to use within the time recommended in the chart. Date food packages and use the oldest first. Foods stored for longer than recommended times or beyond date on the package may change quality, color and flavor.
• Buy fresh-looking packages. Dusty cans or torn labels can indicate old stock. Do not purchase dented or bulging cans.

Cupboard Storage Cupboard Storage2

Courtesy & Credits : UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA–LINCOLN &  North Dakota State University

Excerpts from original articles by


 

Know : List of Largest Producers of Vegetables and Fruits

Here are the lists of top two vegetables and fruits producing countries.

Note: Not all the vegetables and fruits are listed.

Vegetables

 

Vegetable Largest Producer Second Largest Producer
Dry Bean  India  Brazil
Onion and Garlic  China  India
Cabbage  China  India
Green Bean  China  Indonesia
Chick peas  India  Pakistan
Pulses  India  Mozambique
Cauliflowers and Broccoli  China  India
Brinjal  China  India
Potato  China  India
Tomato  China  United States
Spinach  China  United States
Cassava  Nigeria  Thailand
Soybean  United States  Brazil
Carrot  China  Russia
Cucumber  China  Iran

Fruits

Fruit Largest Producer Second Largest Producer
Apricot  Turkey  Iran
Banana  India  China
Mango  India  China
Coconut  Philippines  Indonesia
Sugar cane  Brazil  India
Grapes  China  Italy
Oranges  Brazil  United States
Papaya  India  Brazil
Peach  China  Italy
Apple  China  United States
Pineapples  Philippines  Thailand
Almond  United States  Spain
Sweet Potato  China  Tanzania
Lemon  Mexico  India
Raspberry  Russia  Poland
Stone fruits  Iran  China
Strawberry  United States  Spain
Blueberry  United States  Canada
Kiwifruit  Italy  New Zealand
Currant  Russia  Poland
Date  Egypt  Saudi Arabia
Cherry  Turkey  United States
Avocado  Mexico  Chile
Watermelon  China  Iran

Courtesy and Source : Wikipedia

 

 


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Food We Eat : 15 Rare Fruits! :)

Exotic Fruits 15

 

Ackee

In Jamaica, the ackee fruit is a mixed blessing. Though originally native to West Africa, it migrated to Jamaica in 1778 and is now the country’s national fruit. If improperly eaten, though, ackee can cause what has been dubbed the Jamaican Vomiting Sickness — which, other than the self-explanatory symptoms, can lead to coma or death. Unripe ackee fruit contains a poison called hypoglycin, so preparers must be careful to wait until the fruit’s protective pods turn red and open naturally. Once open, the only edible portion is the yellow arilli, which surround always-toxic black seeds. With all that risk comes a delicious payoff — Jamaica’s national dish is ackee with codfish. You have to commend the bravery of whoever first tried these strange-looking fruits. The ackee is sometimes called a “vegetable brain” because only the inner, brain-shaped, yellowish arils are edible. 

Rambutan

Native to the Malay Archipelago, the name of this fruit is derived from the Malay word meaning “hairy,” and you can see why. But once the hairy exterior of the rambutan is peeled away, the tender, fleshy, delicious fruit is revealed. Its taste is described as sweet and sour, much like a grape.

Physalis

These fruits encased in an unusual, lantern-like husk are part of the nightshade family and thus share a relation with the much more familiar tomato. Since it has a mild, refreshing acidity similar to the tomato, it can be used in many of the same ways. Imagine enjoying some pasta with fresh physalis sauce

Jabuticaba

jabu

The jabuticaba fruit is unusual in that it appears to blossom right out of the bark and trunk of its tree. The tree may even look covered in purple warts or pimples when it is fully in season. It is often used in its native lands in South America much like grapes are used elsewhere. Jabuticaba wines and liqueurs are both popular and exquisite.

Africian Horned Cucumber

Cucumis metuliferus aka Kiwano, African Horned Cucumber Originated in semi arid Africa near the Kalahari desert. Thorny oval fruits are filled with green-gold gel and lots of seeds; very high in vitamin C. The flavor is reminiscent of pomegranate and citrus. The primary market niche is for garnishes and decorative fruits.

Durian 

Revered in Southeast Asia as the “king of fruits,”  This large fruit can be recognized by its thorn-covered husk and pungent odor, which has been likened to the smell of gym socks or rotten onions. That may not sound appetizing, but for those who enjoy it, it’s a thick slice of heaven. 

Miraclefruit

Native to West Africa, this berry got its name from its incredible ability to make sour fruits (like lemons and limes) taste sweet instead, when the juices are mixed together. It accomplishes this feat by utilizing a molecule called miraculin, which works by distorting the shape of sweetness receptors on the taste buds. Be careful, though, because although the miraclefruit can distort the taste of sour foods, it does not change the chemistry of the food. Thus, it could leave the stomach and mouth vulnerable to high acidity. 

Mangosteen

No, this isn’t some exotic variety of mango. Native to Indonesia, Mangosteen is sweet and tangy, juicy, and somewhat fibrous, with an inedible, reddish purple rind. The fragrant, edible flesh of the mangosteen can be described as sweet, tangy, citrusy and peachy. Naturally grown in tropical Southeast Asia, it has been so prized that Queen Victoria is said to have offered a reward of 100 pounds to anyone who could bring her a fresh one. The sweet meat of this fruit is, perhaps appropriate to the legend, well protected by its hard shell, which typically must be split with a knife and cracked open before it can be enjoyed.

Langsat

The plant, which originates from western Southeast Asia, bears edible fruit. It is the provincial flower for the Indonesian province of South Sumatra. The skin is thin and releases a white sap when cooked. The flesh is watery and tastes sweet and sour. Unlike duku, langsat fruit does not last long after being picked. Three days after being picked, the skin blackens; this does not affect the fruit’s taste.

Cherimoya

The cherimoya or Custard Apples is believed indigenous to the interandean valleys of Ecuador, Colombia and Bolivia.  It is white, juicy and fleshy, with a soft custard-like texture and large seeds that look like beans. It is creamy and tastes like a combination of banana, pineapple and strawberry. The skin and seeds shouldn’t be eaten. Cherimoyas are like avocados in that they will ripen at room temperature right on your kitchen counter.

Aguaje fruit

The aguaje fruit is just another nutrient-rich, pulpy gem with the potential to gain as much popularity as the now familiar acai berry or guarana extract. Local people living within the Peruvian Pacaya-Samiria National Reservehave cultivated this fruit, and a variety of others, as part of their culture. The aguaje fruit ripens on a palm tree, and when it is ready to eat, one must peel back the maroon scales before munching on the crisp yellow flesh inside. Tasters have compared the aguaje fruit to a carrot.

Jack Fruit

Enormous and prickly on the outside, jackfruit looks somewhat like durian (though jackfruit is usually even larger). Once a jackfruit is cracked open, what you will find inside are pods or “bulbs”. Often referred to as the seeds, these bulbs are actually a kind of fleshy covering for the true seeds or pits, which are round and dark like chesnuts. The fleshy part (the “bulb”) can be eaten as is, or cut up and cooked. When unripe (green), it is remarkably similar in texture to chicken, making jackfruit an excellent vegetarian substitute for meat. In fact, canned jackfruit (in brine) is sometimes referred to as “vegetable meat”.

Monstera deliciosa

Native to the rain forests of Central America, monstera deliciosa looks more like an ear of corn than a fruit. To get to its pineapple-like flesh, the scaly exterior must be flaked off and delicately prepared. Interestingly, this fruit takes as long as a year to ripen and to be safe enough to eat — it can be toxic if unripe.  

Cupuacu

The fruit of the tree, which is called by the same name, has been a primary food source for natives in the rainforest for centuries and has a creamy, exotic pulp at the center of a large melon. The fruits are about the size of a medium-sized watermelon and become ripe from January to April, during the rainy season. These are gathered, split open, and the pulp is made into juice, ice cream, jam, tarts, smoothies and more. These are considered delicacies in many of the larger cities of South America, such as Rio

Pepino

The unusual, round fruits of the Melon pear are cream skinned with purple streaks. The deliciously sweet and juicy flesh has a taste and aroma similar to melon, and can be eaten in a similar way. Common throughout its native lands in South America, this fruit has been exported as far away as New Zealand and Turkey. It can bear fruit within four to six months of being planted and makes a resilient crop, so it’s a favorable option for farmers who know of it.

Food we eat : Dragon Fruit

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_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Make way for the new, aptly-named superfruit, the dragonfruit! From pomegranates to açai berries, from goji berries to yumberries, the world has seen plenty of Superfruits break into the market. Well, here comes another. The dragonfruit, also known as pitaya or pitahaya, is the latest entrant to the world of Superfruits. Native to Central and South America and cultivated in places as diverse as South East Asia and Australia, this fruit from the cactus species come in three varieties – red skin with red flesh (widely considered to be the best-tasting), red skin with white flesh and yellow skin with white flesh. 

Dragon Fruit

Dragon Fruit

From the cactus family, specifically the genus Hylocereus or sweet pitayas, dragonfruit is football-shaped and has a leathery, leafy skin that is deep red or pink in color. It comes in three varieties, red flesh, white flesh and yellow flesh, all of which are embedded with hundreds of black seeds and have a mild, sweet taste. The best-tasting variety is the one with red flesh, which is succulent when eaten.

One dragonfruit can weigh between 150 and 600g, but with its thick covering, only about 60 percent is edible. To enjoy dragonfruits, it is best to eat the creamy pulp cold. The middle part is the sweetest, and after cutting the fruits in half, you just have to spoon the flesh out. Dragonfruits are common in Asia (particularly in Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand and the Philippines) and in Central and South America. They are among the many wonder fruits that are said to provide multiple health benefits. In addition, dragonfruits help protect the environment because they absorb carbon dioxide at nighttime, and then release oxygen to purify the air.

If you are looking for fruits that are filling and delicious, but will help keep your weight in check, dragonfruits are a perfect choice. A 100g serving of dragonfruit has only 60 calories: 18 calories from fat (all unsaturated), 8 calories from protein and 34 calories from carbohydrates. Dragonfruits do not have complex carbohydrates, so they can be easily broken down by the body.

Dragonfruits do not contain cholesterol, saturated fat and trans fat, so regular consumption will help manage your blood pressure and control your cholesterol levels. The seeds of dragonfruits are high in polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids) that reduce triglycerides and lower the risk of cardiovascular disorder.

Dragonfruits are high in fiber, so regular consumption can help avoid constipation, improve your digestive health and help you reduce weight.

Dragonfruits are rich in vitamin C, containing 9mg per serving that is equivalent to 10 percent of the daily value. Thus, eating dragonfruits helps strengthen your immune system and promotes faster healing of bruises and wounds. In fact, regular eating of dragonfruits will help ward off chronic respiratory disorders such as asthma and cough. Dragonfruits also contain B vitamins such as B1 for better carbohydrate metabolism, B2 for recovery and improvement of appetite, and B3 for reducing bad cholesterol while improving the skin condition.

Dragonfruits are also packed with minerals such as calcium for stronger bones and teeth, phosphorus for tissue formation and iron for healthy blood. One dragonfruit contains approximately 8.8g of calcium, 36.1mg of phosphorus and 0.65mg of iron.

Dragonfruits contain phytoalbumins, which have antioxidant properties that help prevent the formation of cancer cells. In addition, dragonfruits are also known to increase the excretion of heavy metal toxins from the body.

Lycopene is also present in dragonfruits, and this is the pigment responsible for their red color. Lycopene is said to prevent prostate cancer.

“You might be risking life by eating fruits” says Doctors

I have read this article talked about the effects of consuming a hybrid fruit and its dangerous side effects if consumed along with some medicines. They also claim side effects / interference of natural fruit consuming if they are taken along with other medicines. 

It is a well known fact that all foods (natural / artificial) if broken up, they are mere chemical combinations of proteins, minerals, vitamins, fat, carbohydrates, etc. Even our elders had advised not to eat certain foods in certain combination. For example, Pepper is a medicine that can break any poison (mild ones) and save you. Same pepper cannot be consumed if we take some other medication else it will affect the former’s effect. Many permutation combinations are there, even for food. 

Indian cuisines and food habits are well balanced matching to our environment. There is a reason why we take food in a certain order and why we use banana leaf instead of plates. Same applicable for cuisines of other countries too. They were being balanced matching to their temperature and living conditions. So this is making it evident that our food remained as our medicines for a long time. Now we have increased our dependency on drugs which is inevitable as a part of evolution and survival of the fittest theory. 

Life span depends a lot on modern medicines now. Same might have happened when Ayurveda or Unani or Siddha or any native medicinal procedures were invented. Side effects were the part of it, till they had attained a certain stability and knowledge. Only worry about today’s medicines are many people behind that are money minded and selfish and may go any extend for it.

A Question, Is our medicines counterattacking natural fruits? Those fruits once remained as medicines. A healthy diet of all foods can prevent us from using any drugs isn’t it? 

Pharma Industries are the most complicated industries kept aloof from common man’s knowledge. Are the drugs designed to perfection to have certain side effects and the counter medicine’s production will start once their side effects are spread? Simply they wants to be the disease and the cure and the side effects and the cure? One thing is sure happening around with most of the Pharma companies are more business than a service and a humanitarian responsibility they have for us. They wish to stay ahead in the market with the competitors and are willing to do anything for it. 

It is we need to be careful about what drugs we consume and utilize drugs from good socially responsible pharma companies. Doctors have an important role in this. I am not talking about doctors who prescribe medicines for their commissions from salesperson of a Pharma company. I am concerned about responsible doctors among us, identify yourselves and just educate your patient by taking your few minutes on what you are prescribing and how responsibly you have chosen that particular medicine, its side effects with other natural foods

Most of the doctors in India won’t advise on this front to the patients. Wish that changes gradually.  Look at the article below and few more articles referred for further reading.  Some say to consume, some say not to. What should we follow? 🙂

-Words by Din

An article from dailymail.uk (click to read the complete article)

Courtesy : Wiki

Courtesy : Wiki

As doctors warn it can cause a dangerous reaction with a host of common drugs… Toxic truth about your breakfast grapefruit

  • Researchers warn that grapefruit reacts with many medicines
  • The fruit can cause devastating side-effects from stomach bleeding to kidney problems
  • Doctors say the public is ignorant to the dangers and putting themselves needlessly at risk

WHAT ARE THE EFFECTS OF MIXING GRAPEFRUIT AND MEDICINES?

The side-effects of mixing grapefruit with medicines vary hugely from drug to drug. But some can be deadly. Overdosing on cancer drugs, antibiotics and some antipsychotic drugs can cause irregular heart rhythms and even sudden death. 

In the Nineties, a patient in America died from an irregular heartbeat after taking the antihistamine allergy medicine Terfenadine twice a day while also drinking grapefruit juice two to three times a week. Doctors believed the two were connected.

High doses of anti-cancer drugs can suppress the activity of bone marrow, which creates blood cells and fights infection — putting people with weakened immune systems at further risk of illness.
Stomach bleeding can result from an overdose of blood-thinning drugs such as apixaban and rivaroxaban.

Overdosing on statins can lead to the painful and potentially dangerous breakdown of muscle tissue. As muscle proteins enter the blood, it can put the kidneys under extreme strain and may lead to kidney failure. Other symptoms include muscle pain and swelling, vomiting and diarrhoea.

Older people — who are less able to tolerate overdoses — are more likely to become seriously ill as a result.

CAN OTHER FRUITS HAVE THIS EFFECT?

Grapefruit is the biggest threat, but other fruits can interfere with drugs, too.

Seville oranges, used to make marmalade, and limes contain the same active ingredients that cause the drug problems. 

One patient in Dr Bailey’s study suffered from kidney problems while taking the drug tacrolimus to suppress their immune system after an organ transplant.

He had eaten a staggering 1.5kg of marmalade during the preceding week — more than enough to make the drugs more potent.

Past research by Dr Bailey showed that orange and apple juices may reduce the effectiveness of drugs used to treat cancer, heart conditions and high blood pressure.

In tests, beta-blockers, antibiotics and hay fever treatments were all weakened by juice drunk up to two hours previously.

The problem was caused by naringin (a chemical which makes citrus fruits bitter) which stopped the drugs moving from the small intestine into the bloodstream — the opposite of what happens with grapefruit.

DRUGS THAT INTERACT WITH GRAPEFRUIT…

 ANTI-CANCER

Dasatinib (leukaemia)
Erlotinib (lung cancer and pancreatic cancer)
Everolimus (kidney cancer)
Lapatinib (breast cancer)
Nilotinib  (leukaemia)
Pazopanib (kidney cancer)
Sunitinib (kidney/gastrointestinal cancer)
Vandetanib (thyroid cancer)
Venurafenib (skin cancer)

ANTI-INFECTIVE
Erythromycin (antibiotic)
Halofantrine (malaria)
Maraviroc (HIV)
Primaquine (malaria)
Quinine (malaria)
Rilpivirine (HIV)

ANTI-CHOLESTEROL
Atorvastatin
Lovastatin
Simvastatin

CARDIOVASCULAR
Amiodarone (heart rhythm disorders)
Apixaban (anti-clotting)
Dronedarone (heart rhythm disorders)
Eplerenone (heart failure)
Felodipine (high blood pressure/angina)
Nifedipine (high blood pressure/angina)
Quinidine  (heart rhythm disorder)
Rivaroxaban (anti-blood clotting)
Ticagrelor (anti-blood clotting after heart attack)

CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM
Oral Alfentanil (painkiller)
Oral fentanyl (painkiller)
Oral ketamine (painkiller, sedative)
Lurasidone (schizophrenia/mental health problems)
Oxycodone (painkiller)
Pimozide (schizophrenia/other mental health problems)
Ziprasidone (schizophrenia, mania, bipolar disorder)

GASTROINTESTINAL
Domperidone (anti-nausea)

IMMUNO-SUPPRESSANTS
Cyclosporine (post organ transplant, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis)
Sirolimus (post organ transplant)
Tacrolimus (post organ transplant)

URINARY TRACT
Solifenacin (urinary frequency/incontinence)
Silodosin (enlarged prostate)
Tamsulosin (enlarged prostate)

Courtesy : http://www.dailymail.co.uk