Alert! : River Pollution in India

India is a blessed country when we consider its rich natural sources of water in the form of numerous rivers and lakes. The country has rightly been referred to as the “Land of Rivers” and the people worship the rivers as gods and goddesses. But what is ironical is that in spite of our profound respect and reverence for our rivers, we have not been able to maintain their purity, cleanliness and the physical well-being. Be it Ganga, Yamuna, Brahmaputra or Kaveri or any other river flowing in the soil of our motherland, not a single river is free from pollution. River pollution has been causing serious water-borne diseases and health problems affecting human population as well as animals, fish, and birds in the environment.

Causes of river pollution

River pollution is increasing day by day. In spite of various governmental projects going on in many rivers, there is no sign of water pollution being prevented or stopped. Whom do we blame? Lots of factors lead to water pollution and reducing overall quality of river water. Some of the most serious contributing factors are:

  • Industrial wastes, mixtures of chemicals, heavy metals are all discharged in water and these are difficult to clean up.
  • Agricultural wastes, chemicals, feritilisers, pesticides used in agriculture have made the river water bodies contaminated.
  • Nature’s rain also brings with it pollutants as it falls through polluted air. We call this acid rain, which when reached the soil, releases harmful substances.
  • Domestic wastes from households and the sewage that we throw into rivers increases the pollution levels.
  • Regular disposal of plastic bags and plastic objects, solid wastes, flowers, garlands is another cause of pollution.
  • People responding to nature’s call in open spaces near the water bodies also contribute to river pollution.
  • Animals washing, car washing, clothes washing are other causes.
  • Another cause of river pollution is the dumping of human remains, partially burned bodies, dead bodies, which pose serious health threats.

Some hard facts about river pollution

Surveys undertaken by the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) and the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) have come up with some hard facts on river pollution, in terms of statistical figures, which makes it a matter of really serious concern:

  • Out of the 445 rivers surveyed, not even a quarter of them are fit for bathing.
  • Indian cities generate 10 billion gallons or 38 billion litres of municipal waste water every day, out of which only 29% of it is treated.
  • The Central Pollution Control Board also stated that there were only 160 sewerage systems and sewage treatment plants in nearly 8,000 towns surveyed in 2011.
  •  Only 20% out of nearly 40,000 million litres of sewage produced daily in Indian cities are treated.

Extreme cases of pollution in river Ganga and Yamuna

  • Yamuna has become a garbage dump area with more than 57 % of Delhi’s waste thrown into it.
  • Only 55% of Delhi’s residents are connected to a proper sewerage system.
  • According to the CSE, around 80% of Yamuna’s pollution is due to raw sewage.
  • Ganga is considered to be the most polluted river in India.
  • Approximately 1 billion litres of raw, untreated sewage is dumped in Ganga regularly.
  • Ganga contains 60,000 faecal coliform bacteria per 100 ml, which is a threat to human health.

Effects of river pollution

River pollution is a big menace to the economy, the environment and, of course, human health and the other living organisms. It is a big contributor to a number of health problems and disorders in humans. River pollution also affects aquatic life, leading to growth of unhealthy fish unsuitable for human consumption and also mass fish death. Polluted river waters have affected the lives of animals and birds as well, sometimes threatening their very existence. In the long term, continuous river pollution can lead to loss of biodiversity and even extinction of some species and can disrupt the ecosystem as a whole.


Courtesy and Credits : This article was written by  originally here and she discusses about possible solutions as well. Shared here on our blog for educational purposes only.

Documentary : Scenic Routes Around the World – Asia – India

Trek through India’s Route of the Gods, a journey that transcends dreams and imagination. Start in Leh and end in Benares in the valley of the Ganges, crossing the Himalayas at over 16,000 feet. Along the way, you’ll meet the epic characters that define this remarkable country.

Courtesy and Source : YouTube and Questar Entertainment

Eco Preservation : Have you ever seen a river polluted like this?

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Map of Sunda and Galuh territory

Citarum river in Indonesia that supports a population of 28 million people, delivers 20% of Indonesia’s gross domestic product, and provides 80% of water to Indonesia’s capital Jakarta is one of the most polluted rivers in the world. Urbanization in the last three decades was followed by a rise in untreated household sewage, solid waste and industrial effluents. The more waste enters the river there are more chances for spreading diseases, and already now there are many fishing families that are starving because of a tremendous decrease in fish population due to heavy pollution. 

Citarum river in Indonesia is one of the world’s most polluted rivers

In order to start cleaning pollution as soon as possible Indonesian government will get a loan package of $ 500 million over the next 15 years that should be enough for restoration of Citarum’s river basin by supporting different sanitation projects and construction of waste treatment plants in the river basin in order to ensure safe water supply to millions of people.

The water resources problem is one the biggest problems not only in Indonesia but in many other countries in Asia like for instance China (Yangtze) and India (Ganges). With the vast number of people that live in these areas these countries are facing serious problem of not only water shortage but a possible pandemic level of waterborne diseases. Therefore, successful water management is one of the key questions that needs to be answered. The lives of millions of people in Asia are at stake.

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