Know : Rankings of Countries : Global Innovation Index

The core of the Global Innovation Index Report consists of a ranking of world economies’ innovation capabilities and results. Recognizing the key role of innovation as a driver of economic growth and prosperity, and the need for a broad horizontal vision of innovation applicable to developed and emerging economies, the GII includes indicators that go beyond the traditional measures of innovation such as the level of research and development.

Global Innovation Index

The top-ranked countries in the GII come from different parts of the globe, confirming the global dispersion of innovation. The top 10 this year are ranked as follows:

1. Switzerland (1st in 2012)
2. Sweden (2nd)
3. United Kingdom (5th)
4. Netherlands (6th)
5. United States of America (10th)
6. Finland (4th)
7. Hong Kong (China) (8th)
8. Singapore (3rd)
9. Denmark (7th), and
10. Ireland (9th).

Top GII by region

Complete List of Rankings

Country/Economy Score (0–100) Overall Rank Income  Income Rank Region Regional Rank Efficiency Ratio  Rank
Switzerland 66.59 1 HI 1 EUR 1 1 12
Sweden 61.36 2 HI 2 EUR 2 0.81 55
United Kingdom 61.25 3 HI 3 EUR 3 0.8 60
Netherlands 61.14 4 HI 4 EUR 4 0.91 26
United States of America 60.31 5 HI 5 NAC 1 0.74 86
Finland 59.51 6 HI 6 EUR 5 0.79 67
Hong Kong (China) 59.43 7 HI 7 SEAO 1 0.68 109
Singapore 59.41 8 HI 8 SEAO 2 0.64 121
Denmark 58.34 9 HI 9 EUR 6 0.76 78
Ireland 57.91 10 HI 10 EUR 7 0.81 57
Canada 57.6 11 HI 11 NAC 2 0.78 68
Luxembourg 56.57 12 HI 12 EUR 8 0.89 33
Iceland 56.4 13 HI 13 EUR 9 0.89 30
Israel 55.98 14 HI 14 NAWA 1 0.87 38
Germany 55.83 15 HI 15 EUR 10 0.87 40
Norway 55.64 16 HI 16 EUR 11 0.76 81
New Zealand 54.46 17 HI 17 SEAO 3 0.74 90
Korea Rep. 53.31 18 HI 18 SEAO 4 0.72 95
Australia 53.07 19 HI 19 SEAO 5 0.65 116
France 52.83 20 HI 20 EUR 12 0.79 63
Belgium 52.49 21 HI 21 EUR 13 0.76 75
Japan 52.23 22 HI 22 SEAO 6 0.66 112
Austria 51.87 23 HI 23 EUR 14 0.71 98
Malta 51.79 24 HI 24 EUR 15 1.06 4
Estonia 50.6 25 HI 25 EUR 16 0.82 51
Spain 49.41 26 HI 26 EUR 17 0.71 101
Cyprus 49.32 27 HI 27 NAWA 2 0.86 43
Czech Republic 48.36 28 HI 28 EUR 18 0.81 53
Italy 47.85 29 HI 29 EUR 19 0.79 62
Slovenia 47.32 30 HI 30 EUR 20 0.78 70
Hungary 46.93 31 HI 31 EUR 21 0.94 23
Malaysia 46.92 32 UM 1 SEAO 7 0.81 52
Latvia 45.24 33 UM 2 EUR 22 0.77 74
Portugal 45.1 34 HI 32 EUR 23 0.73 92
China 44.66 35 UM 3 SEAO 8 0.98 14
Slovakia 42.25 36 HI 33 EUR 24 0.75 84
Croatia 41.95 37 HI 34 EUR 25 0.82 50
United Arab Emirates 41.87 38 HI 35 NAWA 3 0.55 133
Costa Rica 41.54 39 UM 4 LCN 1 1.02 9
Lithuania 41.39 40 UM 5 EUR 26 0.69 105
Bulgaria 41.33 41 UM 6 EUR 27 0.88 35
Saudi Arabia 41.21 42 HI 36 NAWA 4 0.8 61
Qatar 41 43 HI 37 NAWA 5 0.71 97
Montenegro 40.95 44 UM 7 EUR 28 0.72 94
Moldova Rep. 40.94 45 LM 1 EUR 29 1.08 2
Chile 40.58 46 UM 8 LCN 2 0.74 88
Barbados 40.48 47 HI 38 LCN 3 0.73 91
Romania 40.33 48 UM 9 EUR 30 0.88 34
Poland 40.12 49 HI 39 EUR 31 0.68 110
Kuwait 40.02 50 HI 40 NAWA 6 1.03 8
TFYR of Macedonia 38.18 51 UM 10 EUR 32 0.72 96
Uruguay 38.08 52 UM 11 LCN 4 0.85 45
Mauritius 38 53 UM 12 SSF 1 0.8 59
Serbia 37.87 54 UM 13 EUR 33 0.82 49
Greece 37.71 55 HI 41 EUR 34 0.65 118
Argentina 37.66 56 UM 14 LCN 5 0.94 20
Thailand 37.63 57 UM 15 SEAO 9 0.76 76
South Africa 37.6 58 UM 16 SSF 2 0.71 99
Armenia 37.59 59 LM 2 NAWA 7 0.86 42
Colombia 37.38 60 UM 17 LCN 6 0.76 79
Jordan 37.3 61 UM 18 NAWA 8 0.77 73
Russian Federation 37.2 62 UM 19 EUR 35 0.7 104
Mexico 36.82 63 UM 20 LCN 7 0.81 56
Brazil 36.33 64 UM 21 LCN 8 0.78 69
Bosnia and Herzegovina 36.24 65 UM 22 EUR 36 0.7 103
India 36.17 66 LM 3 CSA 1 1.02 11
Bahrain 36.13 67 HI 42 NAWA 9 0.62 123
Turkey 36.03 68 UM 23 NAWA 10 0.9 29
Peru 35.96 69 UM 24 LCN 9 0.77 72
Tunisia 35.82 70 UM 25 NAWA 11 0.88 36
Ukraine 35.78 71 LM 4 EUR 37 0.89 31
Mongolia 35.77 72 LM 5 SEAO 10 0.62 122
Georgia 35.56 73 LM 6 NAWA 12 0.71 100
Brunei Darussalam 35.53 74 HI 43 SEAO 11 0.65 119
Lebanon 35.47 75 UM 26 NAWA 13 0.66 114
Viet Nam 34.82 76 LM 7 SEAO 12 0.96 17
Belarus 34.62 77 UM 27 EUR 38 0.75 82
Guyana 34.36 78 LM 8 LCN 10 0.97 15
Dominican Republic 33.28 79 UM 28 LCN 11 0.9 28
Oman 33.25 80 HI 44 NAWA 14 0.54 134
Trinidad and Tobago 33.17 81 HI 45 LCN 12 0.75 85
Jamaica 32.89 82 UM 29 LCN 13 0.79 65
Ecuador 32.83 83 UM 30 LCN 14 0.94 21
Kazakhstan 32.73 84 UM 31 CSA 2 0.61 126
Indonesia 31.95 85 LM 9 SEAO 13 1.04 6
Panama 31.82 86 UM 32 LCN 15 0.61 127
Guatemala 31.46 87 LM 10 LCN 16 0.79 66
El Salvador 31.32 88 LM 11 LCN 17 0.76 80
Uganda 31.21 89 LI 1 SSF 3 0.95 19
Philippines 31.18 90 LM 12 SEAO 14 0.93 24
Botswana 31.14 91 UM 33 SSF 4 0.51 136
Morocco 30.89 92 LM 13 NAWA 15 0.75 83
Albania 30.85 93 LM 14 EUR 39 0.58 129
Ghana 30.6 94 LM 15 SSF 5 0.8 58
Bolivia Plurinational St. 30.48 95 LM 16 LCN 18 0.88 37
Senegal 30.48 96 LM 17 SSF 6 0.95 18
Fiji 30.46 97 LM 18 SEAO 15 0.51 137
Sri Lanka 30.45 98 LM 19 CSA 3 0.99 13
Kenya 30.28 99 LI 2 SSF 7 0.78 71
Paraguay 30.28 100 LM 20 LCN 19 0.82 48
Tajikistan 30 101 LI 3 CSA 4 0.9 27
Belize 29.98 102 LM 21 LCN 20 0.73 93
Cape Verde 29.69 103 LM 22 SSF 8 0.57 130
Swaziland 29.6 104 LM 23 SSF 9 1.06 5
Azerbaijan 28.99 105 UM 34 NAWA 16 0.65 117
Mali 28.84 106 LI 4 SSF 10 1.13 1
Honduras 28.8 107 LM 24 LCN 21 0.66 115
Egypt 28.48 108 LM 25 NAWA 17 0.68 108
Namibia 28.36 109 UM 35 SSF 11 0.48 139
Cambodia 28.07 110 LI 5 SEAO 16 0.87 39
Gabon 28.04 111 UM 36 SSF 12 0.81 54
Rwanda 27.64 112 LI 6 SSF 13 0.64 120
Iran Islamic Rep. 27.3 113 UM 37 CSA 5 0.68 107
Venezuela Bolivarian Rep. 27.25 114 UM 38 LCN 22 1.02 10
Nicaragua 27.1 115 LM 26 LCN 23 0.62 125
Burkina Faso 27.03 116 LI 7 SSF 14 0.79 64
Kyrgyzstan 26.98 117 LI 8 CSA 6 0.56 131
Zambia 26.79 118 LM 27 SSF 15 0.89 32
Malawi 26.73 119 LI 9 SSF 16 0.87 41
Nigeria 26.57 120 LM 28 SSF 17 1.03 7
Mozambique 26.5 121 LI 10 SSF 18 0.67 111
Gambia 26.39 122 LI 11 SSF 19 0.86 44
Tanzania United Rep. 26.35 123 LI 12 SSF 20 0.66 113
Lesotho 26.29 124 LM 29 SSF 21 0.47 140
Cameroon 25.71 125 LM 30 SSF 22 0.84 47
Guinea 25.7 126 LI 13 SSF 23 1.07 3
Benin 25.1 127 LI 14 SSF 24 0.69 106
Nepal 24.97 128 LI 15 CSA 7 0.76 77
Ethiopia 24.8 129 LI 16 SSF 25 0.74 87
Bangladesh 24.52 130 LI 17 CSA 8 0.84 46
Niger 24.03 131 LI 18 SSF 26 0.71 102
Zimbabwe 23.98 132 LI 19 SSF 27 0.91 25
Uzbekistan 23.87 133 LM 31 CSA 9 0.52 135
Syrian Arab Republic 23.73 134 LM 32 NAWA 18 0.45 142
Angola 23.46 135 UM 39 SSF 28 0.94 22
Côte d’Ivoire 23.42 136 LM 33 SSF 29 0.74 89
Pakistan 23.33 137 LM 34 CSA 10 0.97 16
Algeria 23.11 138 UM 40 NAWA 19 0.46 141
Togo 23.04 139 LI 20 SSF 30 0.56 132
Madagascar 22.95 140 LI 21 SSF 31 0.59 128
Sudan 19.81 141 LM 35 SSF 32 0.49 138
Yemen 19.32 142 LM 36 NAWA 20 0.62 124

Note: World Bank Income Group Classification (July 2012): LI = low income; LM = lower-middle income; UM = upper-middle income; and HI = high income. Regions are based on the United Nations Classification (11 February 2013): EUR = Europe; NAC = Northern America; LCN = Latin America and the Caribbean; CSA = Central and Southern Asia; SEAO = South East Asia and Oceania; NAWA = Northern Africa and Western Asia; and SSF = Sub-Saharan Africa.

The Global Innovation Index 2013 (GII), in its 6th edition this year, is co-published by Cornell University, INSEAD, and the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO, a specialized agency of the United Nations).


Courtesy: Wikipedia and www.globalinnovationindex.org

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Know : PISA 2012 Students Survey Results 65 Countries

Participants

Participant Countries

PISA 2012 is the programme’s 5th survey. It assessed the competencies of 15-year-olds in reading, mathematics and science (with a focus on mathematics) in 65 countries and economies.  (Note : INDIA is not a participant)

Around 510 000 students between the ages of 15 years 3 months and 16 years 2 months participated in the assessment, representing about 28 million 15-year-olds globally.

The students took a paper-based test that lasted 2 hours. (You can take the test ONLINE HERE. )The tests were a mixture of open-ended and multiple-choice questions that were organized in groups based on a passage setting out a real-life situation. A total of about 390 minutes of test items was covered.  Students took different combinations of different tests. They and their school principals also answered questionnaires to provide information about the students’ backgrounds, schools and learning experiences and about the broader school system and learning environment.

The OECD’s PISA 2012 tested students on maths, reading and science. The main focus was on maths. Math proficiency is a strong predictor of positive outcomes for young adults. It influences their ability to participate in post-secondary education and their expected future earnings.

Shanghai-China, and Singapore were top in maths, with students in Shanghai scoring the equivalent of nearly three years of schooling above most OECD countries. Hong Kong-China, Chinese Taipei, Korea, Macao-China, Japan, Liechtenstein, Switzerland and the Netherlands were also in the group of top-performing countries.

“With high levels of youth unemployment, rising inequality and a pressing need to boost growth in many countries, it’s more urgent than ever that young people learn the skills they need to succeed,” said OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría during the launch in Washington D.C. “In a global economy, competitiveness and future job prospects will depend on what people can do with what they know. Young people are the future, so every country must do everything it can to improve its education system and the prospects of future generations.”

The survey reveals several features of the best education systems. Top performers, notably in Asia, place great emphasis on selecting and training teachers, encourage them to work together and prioritize investment in teacher quality, not classroom sizes. They also set clear targets and give teachers autonomy in the classroom to achieve them.

Children whose parents have high expectations perform better: they tend to try harder, have more confidence in their own ability and are more motivated to learn.

Of those 64 countries with trend data in maths up to 2012, 25 improved in maths, 25 showed no change and 14 did worse. Brazil, Germany, Israel, Italy, Mexico, Poland, Portugal, Tunisia and Turkey have shown a consistent improvement over this period. Shanghai-China and Singapore improved on their already strong performance in 2009.Italy, Poland and Portugal also increased their share of top performers and reduced their share of low performers. Germany, Mexico and Turkey also managed to improve the performance of their weakest students, many of whom came from socio-economically disadvantaged backgrounds. This shows that countries can simultaneously improve equity and raise performance. You can compare your country with other as well previous year’s performances here. (Click this Link) ; The US Specific data here (Click the Link)

Giving every child the chance to succeed is essential, says the OECD. 23% of students in OECD countries, and 32% overall, failed to master the simplest math problems. Without these basic skills, they are most likely to leave school early and face a difficult future. Some countries have succeeded in helping underperformers: Colombia, Finland, Ireland, Germany, Mexico and Poland have put in place systems to identify and support struggling students and schools early, and have seen the PISA scores of this group increase.

Other key findings include:

Gender gap

Boys perform better than girls in maths. They scored higher in 37 out of the 65 countries and economies, while girls outperform boys in 5 countries. The gender gap is relatively small though; in only six countries is it greater than the equivalent of half a year of formal schooling.

The gap is widest among top students, still wide among the weakest students and about the same for average ones. Girls also feel less motivated to learn maths and have less confidence in their abilities than boys.

Between 2000 and 2012, the gender gap in reading performance – favouring girls – widened in 11 countries and economies. Boys and girls perform similarly in science.

Reading

Of the 64 countries and economies with comparable data up to 2012, 32 improved their reading performance, 22 show no change, and 10 deteriorated. Chile, Estonia, Germany, Hungary, Israel, Japan, Korea, Luxembourg, Mexico, Poland, Portugal, Switzerland and Turkey improved their reading performance across successive assessments.

Across OECD countries, 8.4% of students are top performers in reading. Shanghai-China has the largest proportion of top performers – 25.1%. More than 15% of students in Hong Kong-China, Japan and Singapore are top performers in reading, as are more than 10% of students in Australia, Belgium, Canada, Finland, France, Ireland, Korea, Liechtenstein, New Zealand, Norway and Chinese Taipei.

Science

Shanghai-China, Hong Kong-China, Singapore, Japan and Finland are the top five performers in science in PISA 2012. Estonia, Korea, Viet Nam, Poland, Canada, Liechtenstein, Germany, Chinese Taipei, the Netherlands, Ireland, Australia, Macao-China, New Zealand, Switzerland, Slovenia, the United Kingdom, the Czech Republic and Belgium score above the OECD average in science.

Across OECD countries, 8.4% of students are top performers in science and score at the highest levels. This compares to more than 15% of students in Shanghai-China (27.2%), Singapore (22.7%), Japan (18.2%), Finland (17.1%) and Hong Kong China (16.7%).

Schools and students

High-performing school systems tend to allocate resources more equitably across socio economically advantaged and disadvantaged schools.

Teacher-student relations improved between 2003 and 2012 in all but one country, according to students’ reports. The disciplinary climate also improved during the period, on average across OECD countries and in 27 individual countries and economies.

A better teacher-student relations are strongly associated with greater student engagement with and at school.PISA 2012

The share of immigrant students in OECD countries increased from 9% in 2003 to 12% in 2012. Over this period, the performance disadvantage of immigrant students compared to students without an immigrant background but with similar socio-economic status shrank by 11 score points, equivalent to three months of schooling.

The OECD’s PISA results reveal what is possible in education by showing what students in the highest-performing and most rapidly improving education systems can do. The findings allow policy makers around the world to gauge the knowledge and skills of students in their own countries in comparison with those in other countries, set policy targets against measurable goals achieved by other education systems, and learn from the policies and practices applied elsewhere.

More Detailed Reports can be downloaded from their official website here

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Source and Courtesy : www.oecd.org