Tribute : Edmund Thomas Clint, a Genius Child (1976-1983)

Edmund Thomas Clint an Indian child prodigy known for having drawn over 25,000 paintings in just 2522 days, Sadly, he lived only for 7 years ( May 19, 1976 – April 15, 1983) and passed away due to kidney failure. Clint Road in Kochi, Kerala is named after him.

But what he did in those 7 years is a work of sheer genius. At such a tender age, he had the creative bent of an artistic legend. Normally it would take years of analytical study and training to draw such paintings. His work has been displayed in exhibitions in Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala in 1995 and 2007. At the age of 5, he secured first place in a competition held for painters below the age 18.

A biography, Clint – Nirangalude Rajakumaran (Clint – The Prince of Colors) was written about him. A Brief Hour of Beauty,another biography in English.

The 2007 Malayalam film Anandabhairavi, about a child prodigy was inspired by Clint’s life. Edmund Thomas Clint memorial painting competition for children was held at Kochi in his memory.

We pray for his soul to rest in peace.


Courtesy : Youtube and Wikipedia

 

Eco Preservation : Palmyra Palm Trees

Borassus_flabelliferBorassus (Palmyra Palm) is a genus of six species of fan palms, native to tropical regions of AfricaAsia and New Guinea. They are tall palms, capable of growing up to 30 m high (98 ft). The leaves are long, fan-shaped, 2 to 3 m in length. The flowers are small, in densely clustered spikes, followed by large, brown, roundish fruits.

Palmyra palms are economically useful, and widely cultivated in tropical regions. The palmyra palm has long been one of the most important trees of Cambodia and India, where it has over 800 uses. The leaves are used for thatchingmatsbaskets,fanshatsumbrellas, and as writing material. In Cambodia, the tree is a national flora symbol/emblem that is seen growing around Angkor Wat. The sugar palm can live over 100 years. 

In ancient Indonesia and ancient India, the leaves were used as paper to write on, as a kind of papyrus. In India, leaves of suitable size, shape and texture, and sufficient maturity are chosen. They are then preserved by boiling in salt water with turmeric powder. The leaves are then dried; when they are dry enough, the faces of the leaves are polished with pumice stone. Then they are cut in the proper size. A hole is cut out in one corner. Each leaf will have four pages. The writing is done with a stylus. The writing is of a very cursive and interconnected style. The leaves are then tied up as sheaves.

palm_treeRiver will go dry if you destroy Palmyra palm trees:

“According to Tamil culture, Palmyra palm trees played an important role in water management in the ancient times. The ancestors had a planned vision for the future water needs of the generations that followed, but most importantly a well balanced ecosystem was maintained.

Unlike other trees, Palmyra palm’s roots go vertically into the ground, which in turn brought the ground water to various levels along the path. It irrigated the land, played a significant role in the circulation of water in the aquifers, river beds and rivers. Since the process is natural and balance of consumption was well maintained. Rivers remained perennial those times and these trees had its own significance. That is why these trees are considered as “celestial trees”  You could find all the traditional ponds or lakes they had dug with Palmyra palms around like a fence.”

The stalks are used to make fences and to make a strong, wiry fiber suitable for cordage and brushes. The black timber is hard, heavy, and durable and is highly valued for construction, such as for wharf pilings. The tree also yields many types of food. The young plants are cooked as a vegetable or roasted and pounded to make meal. The fruits are eaten roasted or raw, and the young, jellylike seeds are also eaten. A sugary sap, called toddy, can be obtained from the young inflorescence, either male or female ones. toddy is (called “kallu” in Telugu. The toddy is fermented to make a beverage called arrack, or it is concentrated to a crude sugar called jaggery/palm sugar. It is called Gula Jawa (Javanese sugar) in Indonesia and is widely used in the Javanese cuisine. The roots can be dried to form Odiyal, a hard chewable snack. In addition, the tree sap is taken as a laxative, and medicinal values have been ascribed to other parts of the plant.

In Tamil culture

The Palmyra tree is the official tree of Tamil Nadu. In Tamil culture, it is called karpaha,”Nungu” “celestial tree”, and is highly respected because all its parts can be used. The recently germinated seeds have formed fleshy sprouts below the surface which can be boiled and eaten as a fibrous, nutritious food. The germinated seed’s hard shell is also cut open to take out the crunchy kernel which tastes like a water chestnut but is sweeter. The ripe fibrous outer layer of the fruits is edible after boiling or roasting. When the fruit is tender, the kernel inside the hard shell is an edible jelly that is refreshing and rich in minerals. When the crown of the tree from which the leaves sprout is cut we get an edible cake. In ancient times, dried palm leaves were used to write manuscripts.

Palakkad,Kerala

Palakkad District of Kerala State is popularly known as land of Palmyra trees.Palmyra trees are known as the Icon of this district and has got vast cultural, heritage & literary association. Many novels, stories and poems revolve around these trees. The path-breaking Malayalam novel written by the Indian writer O. V. Vijayan, ‘Khasakkinte Itihasam’ mentions Palmyra trees in various angles. Many people, especially in eastern Palakkad live on earnings by tapping Pamyra Toddy, which are sold in outlets controlled by Co-op Societies.The district authorities are taking the very action to preserve these trees & maintain Palakkad’s Identity.

A Traditional Irrigation System Using Palmyra Palm (Borassus flabellifer) in Kerala, India

traditional irrigation system palm

The multipurpose palmyra palm, is still very important in village culture in India. This paper describes a hitherto undocumented traditional water engineering system prevalent in the Palakkad District of Kerala, India, involving the palmyra palm. (Read more…)

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Courtesy : Wikipediadavesgarden.comRamachandran :Palmyra Irrigation Systemwww.eegarai.net

Know : Max Retail Price (MRP) Violations & Complaints : Numbers

YOU CAN COMPLAINT IF YOU NEED TO PAY MORE THAN MRP, Here are Contact Numbers…

MRPAll packaged goods in India, ranging from beverages to mobile phones to cosmetics, are stamped with a price dictated by the manufacturer as being the maximum allowable cost to the consumer.
Today’s version of MRP was adapted in December 1990. Previous to this date, manufacturer’s had the option of printing the price of their commodities in two ways:

  • ->Retail price Rs, local taxes extra
  • ->Maximum retail price Rs, inclusive of all taxes

Allegations from consumers and organizations that merchants were over-charging by adding additional local taxes on products brought about the change to MRP in 1990. Merchants were tacking on charges under the guise of local taxes when the actual rates were much lower. Consumers could pay one price for a product and a much higher or lower price in a neighboring town. Thus the change was made by the Ministry of Civil Supplies and its executive wing, the Department of Legal Metrology to the Standards of Weights & Measures Act (Packaged Commodities’ Rules). The change was meant to end complaints and confusion of over-charging to consumers for products. There have since been numerous complaints regarding this system of pricing with regards to under-charging of goods relative to MRP.

What does this mean for you?
In theory you should check the MRP on products before purchasing. Some merchants will charge less than the printed price at their discretion. If this happens to me, I make a mental note to return to that store in the future. On the opposite side, some merchants will try to charge more. If questioned, you may get a response that a newer stock has since come into their store with a revised MRP under which they are selling the old stock. While this is not allowable, there isn’t much you can do unless the merchant feels you aren’t willing to ease on the lower price. Another tactic to watch for is a merchant quoting you a price which he/she will then offer a discount on. Being giddy about the prospect of receiving a discount, you may not check the MRP until you’ve reached your destination. Unwrap your item to discover the MRP is actually less than the discounted price you paid.

What can you do to protect yourself?

  • Obtain full information regarding quality and price before making any purchases.
  • Be careful, about false and /or misleading advertisement.
  • Purchase only when you need and do not purchase in a hurry.
  • Do not buy blindly. Demand full information before you buy.
  • Do not compromise on the quality of goods and services and its quality. Purchase only quality products.
  • Ask for Bills always, bills that have enough proof that you can legally claim that you have made the purchase from that particular retailer.

You can file a complaint with the District Forum if you feel you have been over-charged. However, the opposing party has 30 days to file their version of events and can even extend this for an additional 15 day period. As a tourist you have very little recourse legally unless you are a long term traveler in one location.

Do keep one thing in mind. As of 2003, hotels are not subject to the MRP act. Packed goods purchased within a hotel can be sold at the property’s discretion.
Keep your eyes open and always check prices cause your travel budget only goes so far.

For Complaining in India…

S.No. Contact Details of the Concerned Department
1. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Andhra Pradesh,

No. 209, PWD Building,

Gandhi Nagar, Hyderabad,

Andhra Pradesh – 500 380

Ph: 040-27612170

Fax: 040-27613667

HYDERABAD – 500 030

2. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Andaman & Nicobar Island,

Port Blair – 744 101

Ph: 03192-232321

PORT BLAIR – 744 101

3. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Arunachal Pradesh,

Old Secretaraiat  Complex,

Nagarlagun –791110

Ph: 0360-2350837, 2248620, 2351150

Fax:0360-2350837

4. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Assam,

Ulubari,

Guwahati-781007

Ph: 0361-2470992

5. Office of Dept., of Agriculture

Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Bihar, Raja Bajar,

Beli Road,

Patna – 800 014

Ph: 0612-2286258

Fax 0612 -2224365:

6. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Chandigarh Administration,

Old Architect Building, West Wing,

Sector 19-B,

Chandigarh

Ph: 0172-2741341

Fax: 0172-741341,2741503

7. The Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Govt of Chattisgarh,

Raipur-492001 

Ph.0771-2524294/2343274/2343275

8. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Dadra &  Nagar Haveli Administration,

Silvasa – 396 230

Ph: 02639-242721

9. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Daman & Diu Administration,

Daman – 396 220

Ph: 02638-254685

10. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of India Delhi, NCT of Delhi,

117-118, C-Block, Vikas Bhavan,

N.Delhi – 110 002

Ph: 011-23379266, 23379262

Fax: 011- 23379267:

11. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Goa,

Panaji – 403 001

Ph: 0832-2426432

Fax:0832-2220218

12. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Gujarat,

Tolmap Bhavan, Opp. Sarang Pur Water Tank,

Ahmedabad, Gujarat – 380 002

Ph: 079-22114177

Fax: 079-22114234

AHMEDABAD – 380 002 

13. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Haryana,

Footwall chowk, Dist., industries center building ,

Ambala Cantt.

Ph: 0172-708581, 701366

14. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Himachal Pradesh,

Apurti Bhavan, 1st Floor,

Block No. 42, SDA Commercial Complex,

Kasumpti Shimla – 171 009

Ph: 0177-2625345

15 Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Jammu & Kashmir,

Revenue Complex Building,

Takkipora, Srinagar

Ph: 0194-473828

16. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Jammu & Kashmir,

Civil Sectt.

Block-I/16, Jammu

Ph: 0191-2549682

Fax:0191-2566188,2458693

17. Joint Agriculture Director cum

Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Govt of Jharkhand ,Lakshmi Nivas,

Krishi Bahvan, Kanke Road, Ranchi – 834006

0651 230923 (fax)

18. Sri Ramachandra

Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Karnataka,

No.1, Ali Askar Road,

P.B. No. 175, Bangalore, Karnataka – 560 052

Ph: 080-22253500  26682715 (Res)

Fax 080-22259024

BANGALORE-560052

19. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Kerala,

Vikas Bhavan,

Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala – 695 033

Ph: 0471-2303821    2310321  (Res)

Fax:0471-2305996

20. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Lakshdweep,

Kavaratti – 682 555

Ph: 04896-262112

Fax:04896- 263298

KAVARATTI – 682 555

21. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Madhya Pradesh,

Near Dak Bhavan,

Bhopal-Hoshangabad Road,

Bhopal – 462 011

Ph: 0755-2551017;

. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Maharashtra,

Government Barrack No. 7,

Free Press Journal Marg,

Mumbai – 400 021

Ph: 022-22023354

Fax: 022-22024950

23 Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Manipur,

2nd MR Gate, North ADC Lane,

Imphal – 795 001

Ph: 0385-311687,

24. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Meghalaya,

Shillong Temple Road,

Lower Lachuier,

Shillong – 793 001

Ph: 0364-222576

25. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Mizoram,

Aizawal

Ph: 0389-2322872, 2322572

Fax:0389-2321035

26. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Nagaland,

Kohima – 797 001

Ph: 0370-2221609

0370-2222862;    2221764(Res)

27. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Orissa,

Khandagiri,

Bhubneshwar – 751 003

Ph: 0674-4129967

Fax:0674-2402854

28. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Dy. Commissioner (Excise) and Ex-officio Under Secy.(Revenue)

Thattanchavady,

Pondicherry – 605 009

Ph: 0413-252493 (personal), 253462 (Off: with extension), 372523®

255196 (Res) Fax: 0413-253462

29. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Punjab,

17, Bays Building, Sector 17,

Chandigarh

0172-2701131

30. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Rajasthan,

Udyog Bhavan, Tilak Marg,

Jaipur – 300 001

Ph: 0141-380796, 380727

Telefax:380796

31

.

Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Sikkim,

Paljor Stadium, Paljor Stadium Road,

Gangatok – 737 101

Ph: 03592-202893;

32. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Tamil Nadu,

DMS Compound,

Teynampet, Chennai – 600 006

Ph: 044-24321 438

33 Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Tripura,

Tripura, Agartala

Ph: 0381-2325997;

34. The Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Govt of Uttaranchal, 15, Gandhi Road,

Dehradun –248001.

35. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Uttar Pradesh,

7, Walaquad Road, Lucknow – 1 (Uttar Pradesh)

Ph: 0522-2628063;

36. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of West Bengal,

45, Ganesh Chandra Avenue,

Calcutta – 700 013

Ph: 033-22364258,22256647,22520052

Courtesy : http://consumeraffairs.nic.inhttp://www.fullstopindia.com

Indian Navy Day : A Question to the INDIAN NAVY! : Worth 100s of lives!

Indian Navy

Its Indian Navy Day today December 3rd. Our sincere Thanks and Gratitude for the Indian Navy and their services is always there. Long time I do have a question to ask to the Indian Navy!

In South India, especially Tamil fishermen are being captured and killed by the Sri Lankan Navy over a decade, (Registered Statistics say 100+ are killed till 2013) and it has become so routine here to hear the news on TV and papers. 100s of fishermen are killed and their boats are damaged. Reasons are given as they are crossing the border!

another_fisherman_killed4

There had been 167 incidents of shooting on Indian fishermen by the Sri Lankan navy between the years 1991 and 2011. As many as 85 fishermen had been killed and 180 injured in these incidents which took place within the Indian waters.

As per a report that 746 fishermen had been apprehended by the Lankan naval forces and that 741 of them had been repatriated. This was in response to a bunch of petitions seeking protection for Indian fishermen in the Palk bay and the Gulf of Mannar. Contempt petitions against the Indian Coast Guard (ICG) and the Indian Navy also came up for hearing before the bench because the forces had failed to provide adequate security in spite of a court order on the same.

There were more than 100 vessels deployed by the government in the Arabian sea for protecting the fishermen, only fishermen of Kerala received the benefits. Even in terms of compensation, the Tamil Nadu fishermen got meagre amounts while fishermen from Kerala got nearly a crore rupees or more!

Excerpts – Times of India

But my question is why there is no sign of any navy protection or defense on the south side? We all know our Navy is there. But why always Srilankan Navy is coming and shoots our fishermen? Why not our Navy Protects our citizens or keeping up any strict control over the access of Sea Borders so as to limit the fishermen.

The Governments of the State(TamilNadu) and Central are playing “Point your finger on Each other” Game, while innocent fishermen dies the and captured in the Srilankan Prisons. 

This issue is often gets a false propaganda as “Tamilian Fishermen being killed”. Even the rest of the India seems to have this perspective. Why there is neither a humanitarian view or an Indian view to them. Don’t they belong to India? 

Who controls the Navy? Ethically we do not mind who orders whom, when we see lives are killed before our very eyes. Will our navy come forward with initiates to save our citizens? Will they teach a lesson to the Governments who run politics out of this? Will the Navy stand for their Pride and Righteousness? Or is there any falsified information reaches the public on this issue?

We respect the Indian Navy! They earned it. Will they earn the same respect from the families of the Fishermen who lost their brothers and fathers? Will they answer these questions? Ending this with nothing but just questions unanswered!

– Words by Din

Navy Days of other few countries

Navy Days of other few countries

Kanmoni, a Beautiful Girl Inspires : World Differently-Able Day

DECEMBER 3 : International Day of People with Disability [better said as “World Differently-Able Day”]  is an international observance promoted by the United Nations since 1992. It has been celebrated with varying degrees of success around the planet. The observance of the Day aims to promote an understanding of disability issues and mobilize support for the dignity, rights and well-being of persons with disabilities. It also seeks to increase awareness of gains to be derived from the integration of persons with disabilities in every aspect of political, social, economic and cultural life. It was originally called “International Day of Disabled Persons”. Each year the day focuses on a different issue.

Here is the story of Kanmoni…

disability_day_kanmoni_new_360Kanmoni, a beautiful and effervescent 12-year-old from Mavelikara in Kerala, has been winning friends and hearts with her music and zest for life. She was born without arms and with deformed legs, but you would scarcely know that as she plays ‘Twinkle Twinkle Little Star’ on the keyboard. With her feet.

Kanmoni also paints and writes with her feet and is independent in everyday life. “She doesn’t like to depend on anyone. From having her bath, to brushing her teeth, to applying eye liner, to eating her food, she does everything by herself using her feet,” says her mother Rekha Shashikumar.

Mrs Shashikumar says the future had looked dark when she was born, but they had not reckoned with Kanmoni’s fierce desire to live life on her terms.

The journey was not easy. She was refused admission by several schools, before VVHSS school in Thamarakulam took her in.

Now in class 8, school is where she most loves to be. Apart from her family, it is her classmates and her teachers who have been her biggest strength, the pre-teen says.

Like Bindu, a teacher at the school who learnt how to drive so that Kanmoni would not have to commute the 10 km to her school by public transport.

Another teacher,  Lolamma, “placed a pen in my feet as a child, and had given me a parrot’s picture to colour. From that day onward there has been no turning back,” says Kanmoni.

Kanmoni’s class teacher Vividha describes her as a very bright student, loved by her classmates. “We just have to give her a little bit more time in comparison to others to be able to write, since she uses her feet and alter seating arrangements in class to seat her comfortably,” she said.

World Disability Day: inclusion remains a challenge in India

As the world celebrates the International Day for People with Disabilities, in India, accessibility and inclusion of the disabled remain a challenge. While the world has taken giant steps towards inclusion, India still has a lot of work to do.

While cities across the world have moved towards being disabled friendly, India lags behind. Places like Chicago even offer discounts for wheelchair users. But Mumbai, which dreams of becoming Shanghai, may find it difficult to get there, if the challenge of accessibility for the disabled is not met.

Read Complete Article from : NDTV

Courtesy and Source : Wikipedia, NDTV

Note: One article from NDTV is used as it is to keep the inspiration as it is. Unable to cut excerpts from such a beautiful article. Thanks  Sneha Mary Koshy NDTV for bringing this story.