Good vs Evil: Good Samaritan Teens / Teen Rapists

Good vs Evil: What prevails more in our society? Good or Evil? We leave the choice to you to evaluate the society you belong to. However in this new section ‘Good vs Evil’ we bring out the two extremes of the social incidents. The good one which sets an example and ensure we raise our kids like them. And the evil one which makes us aware and ensure we raise our kids unlike them and enable them to protect themselves from such evils.

The Good: Good Samaritan Teens

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Tarbett (17),  Bailey Campbell (17) and Aeron McQuillin (18)

The three teenagers from Ontario, Canada, went for a drive and spotted a stranger’s broken car. She was struggling with no help at the highway, who can’t afford to tow the vehicle. The boys decided to help her by pushing her car till her home. Interestingly, her home is not at the next street, but 7 miles far. But the good Samaritans did it. (Read the full story here)

The Evil : Teen Rapists

Rape-accused

In India, rape has become a routine crime and going on like it has no full stop. According to a report about 1,752 rape incidents are reported every year in the Indian state of Odisha, alone. But it saddens us, when the crime is committed by teenagers whom we can still call as boys next door.  A college student was allegedly gang-raped in Odisha’s Sundargarh by five youth, including three of her classmates, who dragged her into a forest on her way back to home after college. (Read the full story here)

Bottom line: Every kid is born with a blank soul, it is us the society and the parents who script their character. Teach them Good and make them practice it. Make them aware of the Evil and help them fight it.

 

Comment your thoughts… Ideas to bring up good character in kids.

News Courtesy: CBC.ca and News 18 India

Eco Preservation : Sanitation for India

water

848 million Indians do not have access to clean drinking water and toilets. States like Orissa and West Bengal have the highest number of people without access to sanitation facilities. India’s poor sanitary predicament costs the country 54 billion dollars annually. 

The consumption of unsafe water coupled with unsanitary living conditions, leads to contraction of water borne diseases such as typhoid, diarrhea, SARS and Hepatitis A. Diarrhea alone kills 1600 Indians every day.

In order to understand the intertwining of water, sanitation and hygiene, and therefore the biggest problem these pose to India, one must understand the lopsided development in the nation. Not all parts of India have clean sewage facilities. In fact, nearly 80 percent of sewage from Indian cities flows into clean water systems. To add to this problem, nearly 300 million of India’s 1.2 billion people, defecate openly, leading to extreme contamination of water and improper (to say the least) disposal of feces. It is the amalgamation of these problems and little to no awareness on the treatment of unsafe water (such as boiling it), which leads to the contraction of several diseases and an increase in malnutrition amongst children.

– Excerpts from chaiwithlakshmi.in Read more 

You can help them overcome this. Click here to read the complete story here 

Pictures : Cyclone Phailin

Very Severe Cyclonic Storm Phailin (Thai: ไพลิน meaning “sapphire”) was a tropical cyclone that affected ThailandMyanmarNepal and the Indian states of Andaman and Nicobar IslandsOdisha,Andhra PradeshJharkhand and West Bengal.

The system was first noted as a tropical depression on October 4, 2013 within the Gulf of Thailand, to the west of Pnom Penh in Cambodia. Over the next few days, it moved westwards within an area of low to moderate vertical wind shear, before as it passed over the Malay Peninsula, it moved out of the Western Pacific Basin on October 6. It emerged into the Andaman Sea during the next day and moved west-northwest into an improving environment for further development before the system was named Phailin on October 9, after it had developed into a cyclonic storm and passed over the Andaman and Nicobar Islands into the Bay of Bengal.

During the next day Phailin intensified rapidly and became a very severe cyclonic storm on October 10, while it was equivalent to a category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale (SSHWS). On October 11, the system became equivalent to a category 5 hurricane on the SSHWS before it started to weaken during the next day as it approached the Indian state of Odisha. It made landfall later that day, near Gopalpur in Odisha coast at around 2130 IST (1600 UTC). It subsequently weakened over land as a result of frictional forces, before it was last noted on October 14, as it degenerated into a well marked area of low pressure.

Officials from Odisha’s state government said that around 12 million people may be affected. As part of the preparations, 600 buildings were identified as cyclone shelters and people were evacuated from areas near the coast, including Ganjam, Puri, Khordha and Jagatsinghapur districts in Odisha. The cyclone has prompted India’s biggest evacuation in 23 years with more than 550,000 people moved up from the coastline in Odisha and Andhra Pradesh to safer places.

Courtesy : Wikipedia and Google (images various news portals)

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