Know : List of Foods’ Storage Periods

 

Food-storage-shelf-items

Proper food storage helps maintain food quality by retaining flavor, color, texture and nutrients, while reducing the chance of contracting a food-borne illness. Foods can be classified into three groups.

  • Perishable foods include meat, poultry, fish, milk, eggs and many raw fruits and vegetables. All cooked foods are considered perishable foods. To store these foods for any length of time, perishable foods need to be held at refrigerator or freezer temperatures. If refrigerated, perishable foods should be used within several days.
  • Semi-perishable foods, if properly stored and handled, may remain unspoiled for six months to about one year. Flour, grain products, dried fruits and dry mixes are considered semi-perishable.
  • Staple, or non-perishable, foods such as sugar, dried beans, spices and canned goods do not spoil unless they are handled carelessly. These foods will lose quality, however, if stored over a long time, even if stored under ideal conditions.

There is no exact method to determine how long a food will maintain quality and be safe to eat, because many conditions affect the quality. The storage life of foods is affected by the:

  • freshness of the food when it reached the grocery store
  • length of time and the temperature at which it was held before purchase
  • temperature of your food storage areas
  • humidity level in your food storage areas
  • type of storage container or packaging the food is stored in
  • characteristics of the food item

 

Storage Periods for Retaining Food Quality
Food Room Temperature Refrigerator Freezer at 0°F
Milk/Milk Products
Milk 1 week 1 month
Butter 2 weeks 12 months
Canned or dry milk (unopened) 6 months
Cottage cheese 1 week 3 months
Cream 1-2 weeks
Ice cream 2-3 weeks
Margarine 1 month 12 months
Natural cheese 1 month 4-6 months
Processed cheese 1 month 4-6 months
Sour cream, buttermilk, cream cheese 2 weeks Not recommended
Yogurt 1 month
Meat
Fresh roasts, steaks, chops 3-4 days 2-3 months
Fresh livers, hearts, kidneys, other variety meats 1-2 days 3-4 months
Fresh ground meat, stew meat 1-2 days 3-4 months
Cured pork and lunch meat 1 week Not recommended
Cooked meat, gravies made with meat stock 2-3 days 2-3 months
Canned meat 1 year
Meat pies, stews, casseroles, meat salads 2-3 days 3 months
Hotdogs 1 week (opened) 2 weeks (unopened) 1-2 months
Bacon 7 days 1 month
Sausage, raw from pork, beef, turkey 1-2 days 1-2 months
Hard sausage-pepperoni, jerky sticks 2-3 weeks 1-2 months
Poultry/Eggs
Fresh poultry 2 days 6-8 months
Cooked poultry 2-3 days 6 months
Poultry stuffing 1 day
Poultry pies, stews, creamed dishes, gravies 1 day 6 months
Poultry salads 1 day
Eggs 2-4 weeks 1 year
Raw yolk, whites 2-4 days 1 year
Hardcooked eggs 1 week Not recommended
Liquid pasteurized eggs or egg substitutes 10 days (unopened) 3 days (opened) 1 year (unopened)
Egg-containing products: custards, custard sauces, puddings, custard-filled pastries or cakes 1-2 days Not recommended
Puddings, canned 1-2 days (opened)
Fish/Seafood
Fresh fish 1-2 days 3-6 months
Cooked fish 3-4 days 1 month
Fish salad 1 day
Smoked fish 10 days 4-5 weeks
Canned fish 1 year Not recommended
Dried or pickled fish 3-4 weeks
Clams, oyster (shucked) and scallops 7-9 days
Crab 7 days 2 months
Shrimp 3-5 days 6-12 months
Lobster (shelled or unshelled) 3-7 days 6-12 months
Wild Game
Venison 3-5 days 3-4 months
Rabbit, squirrel 1-2 days 12 months
Wild duck, pheasant, goose(whole) 1-2 days 6 months
Fruits
Apples Until ripe 1 month
Citrus fruits 2-6 weeks
Grapes 1-3 weeks
Melons, most varieties 1 week
Peaches, nectarines 2-3 weeks
Pears (mature but not fully ripe) 1-3 months
Pineapple, ripe 1 week
Other fresh fruit Until ripe 3-5 days 9-12 months
Canned fruit 1 year 2-4 days (opened)
Dried fruit 6 months 2-4 days (cooked)
Fruit juice concentrates 1 year
Canned fruit juices 1 year 3-4 days (opened)
Vegetables
Asparagus 2-3 days
Broccoli, brussels sprouts, green peas, green onions, lima beans, rhubarb, greens, summer squash, mushrooms 3-5 days
Cabbage, cauliflower, celery, cucumbers, snap beans, lettuce, peppers, tomatoes 1 week
Carrots, beets, parsnips, radishes, turnips 2 weeks
Corn 1 day
White potatoes, sweet potatoes, winter squash, rutabagas, dry onions 1 week (several months at 50-60°F)
Canned or dried vegetables 1 year 1-4 days (opened/cooked)
Cereal Products
Flour, white 1 year
Flour, whole or wheat 6-8 months 1 year
Rice, white 2 years
Rice, brown 6 months
Ready-to-eat cereals 1 year
Uncooked cereals 1 year
Pasta 1 year
Corn meal 1 year
Bakery Goods
Breads, baked with no preservatives 2-3 weeks 2-3 months
Breads, quick, baked 2 months
Cake, angel 6-12 months
Cake, baked, frosted 1 month
Cake, baked, unfrosted 2-4 months
Cakes, batter 1 month
Cakes, fruit 6-12 months
Cinnamon rolls, partially baked 2 months
Cookies, baked, homemade 2-3 weeks 6-12 months
Cookies, dough 1-2 days 3 months
Cookies, packaged 2 months 12-18 months
Crackers 2 months
Doughnuts, unfrosted 2-4 months
Muffins, baked 6-12 months
Pies, fruit 2-3 days (baked) 1-2 days (unbaked) 6-8 months (baked) 2-4 months (unbaked)
Pies, pumpkin or chiffon 2-3 days 1-2 months
Rolls and bread, unbaked 2-3 weeks 1 month
Waffles 1 month
Mixes/Packaged Foods
Biscuit, brownie, muffin mix 9 months
Cake mixes 6-9 months
Casserole mix 9-12 months
Cookies, homemade 2-3 weeks
Cookies, packaged 2 months
Crackers 3 months
Croutons and bread crumbs 6 months 6 months 1 year
Frosting, canned 3 months
Frosting, mix 8 months
Hot roll mix 18 months
Pancake mix 6-9 months
Piecrust, mix 6-9 months
Potatoes, instant 6-12 months
Rice mixes 6 months
Sauce and gravy mixes 6-12 months
Soup mixes 12 months
Toaster pastries 2-3 months
Other Foods
Baking powder 18 months
Baking soda 2 years
Chocolate syrup 2 years (unopened) 6 months (opened)
Cocoa mixes 8 months
Coffee, lighteners (dry) 9 months (unopened) 6 months (opened)
Cornstarch 18 months
Gelatin 18 months
Pectin 1 year
Salad dressings, bottled 12 months (unopened) 1-3 months (opened) Not recommended
Sugar, brown 18 months
Sugar, confectioners’ 18 months
Sugar, granulated 2 years
Vinegar 2 years (unopened) 1 year (opened)
Cheese, parmesan, grated 10 months (unopened) 2 months (opened)
Coconut, shredded 12 months (unopened) 6 months (opened)
Imitation bacon bits, etc. 4 months
Peas, beans, dried 12 months
Popcorn 2 years
Whipped topping, dry 12 months
Yeast, dry Expiration date on package
Honey, jams, syrups, molasses 1 year
Nuts, unshelled 6 months
Nuts, shelled 6 months
Peanut butter 6 months (unopened) 2 months (opened)
Chocolate 1 year
Coffee 1 year (unopened) 2-4 weeks (opened)
Coffee, instant 6 months (unopened) 2 months (opened)
Pudding mixes 1 year
Shortening, solid 8 months
Vegetable oils 1-3 months
Tea, bags or loose 1 year
Tea, instant 1 year
Soft drinks 3 months
Bouillon products 1 year
Mayonnaise 10-12 weeks Not recommended
Spices, Herbs, Condiments, Extracts
Catsup, chili sauce 12 months (unopened) 1 month (opened)
Mustard, prepared yellow (refrigerate 2 years (unopened) for longer storage) 6-8 months (opened)
Spices, whole 1-2 years
Spices, ground 6 months
Herbs 6 months
Herb/spice blends 2 years (unopened) 12 months (opened)
Other extracts 12 months

Exclusive Cupboard Storage Chart
• Store foods in cool cabinets and away from appliances which produce heat.
• Many staples and canned foods have a relatively long shelf life, but buy only what you can expect to use within the time recommended in the chart. Date food packages and use the oldest first. Foods stored for longer than recommended times or beyond date on the package may change quality, color and flavor.
• Buy fresh-looking packages. Dusty cans or torn labels can indicate old stock. Do not purchase dented or bulging cans.

Cupboard Storage Cupboard Storage2

Courtesy & Credits : UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA–LINCOLN &  North Dakota State University

Excerpts from original articles by


 

Know : National Trees List

Arbol de Artiga

Arbol de Artiga – Uruguay’s National Tree

Do you know? The Oak Tree(sub species included) is the national tree for 15 countries which is the most, followed by the Olive Tree which is the national tree for 4 countries. Almost all are officially announced except a few. Please find the complete list below.

Country Name of tree Scientific name Picture
 Albania Olive Olea europaea Olea europea 3.jpg  
 Antigua and Barbuda Whitewood Bucida buceras Starr 080530-4639 Bucida buceras.jpg
 Argentina Ceibo and Red Quebracho Erythrina crista-galliSchinopsis balansae Erythrina crista-galli 2-3.jpg Schinopsis balansae.jpg
 Australia Golden Wattle Acacia pycnantha Acacia pycnantha Golden Wattle.jpg  
 Bahamas Lignum Vitae Guaiacum sanctum Guaiacum sanctum.jpg
 Bangladesh Mango tree Mangifera indica Mango blossoms.jpg  
 Belize Honduras Mahogany Swietenia macrophylla Leaves I IMG 8668.jpg  
 Bhutan Bhutan Cypress Cupressus cashmeriana CupressusCashmerianaSochi.JPG  
 Brazil Brazilwood Caesalpinia echinata Brazilwood tree in Vitória, ES, Brazil.jpg  
 Cambodia Palmyra palm Borassus flabellifer Borassus flabellifer fruit on the tree.JPG
 Canada Maple Aceraceae Acer saccharum.jpg  
 Chile Monkey-puzzle Araucaria araucana IMG 6492 monkey puzzle.JPG  
 China Ginkgo Ginkgo biloba Ginkgo Biloba Leaves - Black Background.jpg  
 Colombia Quindio wax palm Ceroxylon quindiuense Ceroxylon quindiuense 2.png  
 Costa Rica Guanacaste Enterolobium cyclocarpum Árbol de Guancaste.jpg
 Croatia Pedunculate oak Quercus robur Quercus robur.jpg
 Cuba Palma Real Roystonea regia Roystonea regia.jpg
 Cyprus Golden oak Quercus alnifolia Golden oak.JPG  
 Czech Republic Small-leaved Lime/Small-leaved Linden Tilia cordata Tilia cordata 60.jpg
 Denmark Beech Fagus CemeteryBeech.jpg  
 Dominican Republic West Indian Mahogany Swietenia mahagoni Tree in new leaves I IMG 6222.jpg
 Ecuador Cinchona pubescens Cinchona pubescens  
 El Salvador Maquilishuat Tabebuia rosea    
 England Royal Oak Quercus robur Baginton oak tree july06.JPG  
 Estonia Pedunculate Oak Quercus robur Baginton oak tree july06.JPG  
 Finland BirchSilver Birch BetulaBetula pendula Betula pendula Finland.jpg  
 Germany Oak Quercus Ivenacker Eichen 1000 Jahre alt.JPG  
 Greece Olive Olea europaea Olea europea 3.jpg  
 Guatemala Kapok Ceiba pentandra Kapok tree Honolulu.jpg  
 India Banyan Tree Ficus benghalensis Banyantree.jpg
 Indonesia Teak Tectona Tree in new leaves (Tectona grandis) I IMG 8133.jpg  
 Ireland Sessile Oak Quercus petraea Quercus petraea 06.jpg  
 Iran Cedrus Cupressus sempervirens Cypress of Abarqu.JPG  
 Israel Olive Olea europaea Olea europea 3.jpg  
 Italy OliveOak Olea europaeaQuercus Olea europea 3.jpg  
 Jamaica Blue Mahoe (national tree) Talipariti elatum  
 Japan Cherry blossom Prunus serrulata Sakura and Moss Pink - 桜(さくら)と芝桜(しばざくら).jpg  
 North Korea Magnolia Magnolia Magnlia sieboldii visby.JPG  
 South Korea Hibiscus syriacusPinus densiflora Hibiscus syriacus “Pinus densiflora” Kumgangsan-11.jpg  
 Laos Frangipani Plumeria Frangipani flowers.jpg  
 Latvia Oak Quercus robur Baginton oak tree july06.JPG  
 Lebanon Lebanon Cedar Cedrus libani Libanonzeder.jpg  
 Macedonia Macedonian Pine Pinus peuce Pinus peuce Habitus BotGardBln0906.jpg  
 Madagascar Baobab Adansonia KayesBaobab.jpg  
 Maldives Coconut palm Cocos nucifera Kerala Backwaters Sunset.JPG  
 Malta Għargħar Tetraclinis articulata Tetraclinis articulata8.jpg  
 Mexico Ahuehuete Taxodium mucronatum Árbol-del-Tule-Oaxaca-Mexico.jpg
 Moldova Oak Quercus Raunkiaer.jpg  
   Nepal Rhododendron Rhododendron Rhododendron-by-eiffel-public-domain-20040617.jpg  
 New Zealand Silver fern Cyathea dealbata Silver-fern.jpg  
 Pakistan Deodar Cedrus deodara Pedrengo cedro nel parco Frizzoni.jpg
 Palestine Olive Olea europaea Olea europea 3.jpg  
 Panama Panama tree Sterculia apetala    
 Paraguay Lapacho Handroanthus impetiginosus Tabebuia impetiginosa hábito 2.jpeg  
 Peru CinchonaKiwicha CinchonaAmaranthus caudatus Amaranthus caudatus0.jpg
 Philippines Narra Pterocarpus indicus Pterocarpus indicus Blanco1.205.png  
 Poland Oak Quercus Raunkiaer.jpg
 Portugal Cork oak Quercus suber Cork tree.jpg
 Romania Oak Quercus Raunkiaer.jpg  
 Russia Birch tree Betula Betula pendula 001.jpg  
 Saudi Arabia Phoenix palm Phoenix Phoenix dactylifera100 4209.JPG  
 Scotland Scots Pine Pinus sylvestris Pinus sylvestris Glenmuick.jpg  
 Senegal Baobab Adansonia KayesBaobab.jpg  
 Serbia OakSerbian Spruce QuercusPicea omorika Picea omorika2.jpg  
 Slovakia Small-leaved Lime/Small-leaved Linden Tilia cordata Tilia cordata 60.jpg
 Slovenia Tilia (Linden) Tilia Tilia tomentosa.jpg  
 South Africa Real yellowwood Podocarpus latifolius Podocarpus latifolius - Cape Town - 3.JPG
 Sri Lanka Na Mesua ferrea MesuaFerrea IronWood.jpg  
 Tanzania African Blackwood Dalbergia melanoxylon    
 Thailand Rachapruek Cassia fistula Konnamaram.JPG  
 Ukraine PineWillow PinusSalix Salix alba Morton.jpg  
 United Kingdom Royal Oak Quercus robur Baginton oak tree july06.JPG  
 United States Oak Quercus Raunkiaer.jpg  
 Uruguay Arbol de Artiga Peltophorum dubium תמונה 1014.jpg  
 Venezuela Araguaney Tabebuia chrysantha Araguaney.jpg  
 Vietnam BambooRice Bambuseae, Oryza sativa BambooKyoto.jpg  
 Wales Sessile Oak Quercus petraea Quercus petraea 06.jpg

Courtesy : Wikipedia

Food We Eat : List of Edible Seeds (Gallery)

This list of edible seeds includes seeds that are directly foodstuffs, rather than yielding derived products. A variety of species can provide edible seeds. Of the six major plant parts, seeds are the dominant source of human calories and protein.Most edible seeds are angiosperms, but a few are gymnosperms. The most important global seed food source, by weight, is cereals, followed by legumes, and nuts.

Edible Seeds List

Beans and other legumes are protein-rich soft seeds.

Bambara groundnut

File:Bambara nut unearthed..JPG
Chickpea

File:India - Varanasi green peas - 2714.jpg
Cowpeas

File:BlackEyedPeas.JPG

Dry beans, including Common bean several species of Vigna, such as the lentil
Fava or broad bean

File:Broad-beans-after-cooking.jpg

Hyacinth bean

File:Lablab purpureus Steve Hurst 1.jpg

Lupin

File:Lupinus albus.JPG

Moringa 

File:Starr 080609-7915 Moringa oleifera.jpg
Pea

File:Peas in pods - Studio.jpg

Peanut, also known as groundnut

File:Peanut 9417.jpg

Pigeon pea

File:Cajanus cajan Steve Hurst 1.jpg
Sterculia species

Velvet bean

File:Mucuna-pruriens-seeds.jpg

Winged bean

File:Japanese Psophocarpus tetragonolobus.jpg

Yam beans

Yam beans

Soybean

File:Soybeanvarieties.jpg

Although some beans can be consumed raw, some need to be heated before consumption. In certain cultures, beans that need heating are initially prepared as a seed cake. Beans that need heating include:


 

Cereals (or grains) are grass-like crops that are harvested for their dry seeds. These seeds are often ground to make flour. Cereals provide almost half of all calories consumed in the world. Botanically, true cereals are members of the Poaceae, the true grass family.
Pseudocereals are cereal crops that are not grasses.

True cereals are the seeds of certain species of grass. Maize, wheat, and rice account for about half of the calories consumed by people every year. Grains can be ground into flour for breadcakenoodles, and other food products. They can also be boiled or steamed, either whole or ground, and eaten as is. Many cereals are present or past staple foods, providing a large fraction of the calories in the places that they are eaten.

Cereals include:

Barley

File:BarleyEars.JPG

Fonio

Fonio
Maize (corn)

File:Corncobs.jpg

Pearl millet

File:Pennisetum glaucum MHNT.BOT.2013.22.56.jpg

Oats

File:Haverkorrels Avena sativa.jpg
Palmer’s grass

Rice

Brown-Rice-INSIDE

Rye

File:Secale cereale - cereal rye - Steve Hurst USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database.jpg

Sorghum

File:Sorghum.jpg

Spelt

File:2009-06-20 Silvolde 02 dinkel.jpg

Teff

File:Teff pluim Eragrostis tef.jpg

Triticale

File:Triticale.jpg

Wheat

File:Wheat close-up.JPG

Wild rice

File:Wildricecooked.jpg

Other grasses with edible seeds include:

Pseudocereals

Breadnut

File:Ramon nuts 05.jpg

Buckwheat

Buck wheat

Cattail

Cattail Chia

File:Semillas de Chía.jpg

Flax

File:Flax seeds.jpg

Grain amaranth

amaranth Kañiwa

KAniwa Pitseed goosefoot

Quinoa

File:Harvested seeds of homegrown Chenopodium quinoa.jpg

Sesame

File:Sa white sesame seeds.jpg

 


Nuts are botanically a specific type of fruit, but the term is also applied to many edible seeds that are not nuts in a botanical sense.
Gymnosperms produce nut-like seeds but neither flowers nor fruits.

According to the botanical definition, nuts are a particular kind of seed. Chestnuts, hazelnuts, and acorns are examples of nuts under this definition. In culinary terms, however, the term is used more broadly to include fruits that are not botanically qualified as nuts, but that have a similar appearance and culinary role. Examples of culinary nuts include almonds, coconuts, and cashews.

List of Nuts

Acorn

File:Acorns small to large.jpg

Almond

File:Mandel Gr 99.jpg

Beech

File:Beechnuts in an autumn.jpg

Brazil nut

File:Brazil nuts.jpg

Candlenut

File:Starr 020803-0119 Aleurites moluccana.jpg

Cashew

File:CashewSnack.jpg

Chestnuts, including:

File:Aesculus hippocastanum fruit.jpg

File:Chestnuts.jpg

Chilean hazel

File:Gevuina avellana-fruto (avellana).JPG
Coconut

File:Coconut.png
Egusi and other melon seeds, including:Colocynth

File:EGUSI UNSHELLED.JPG

Malabar gourd
Pepita

File:Pumpkin seeds in hand.jpg

Ugu

File:Telfairia occidentalis.jpg

Hazelnuts, including:

File:Owoce Orzech laskowy.jpg

Hickory, including:

File:Hickory nuts 6060.JPG

Indian beech

Kola nut

File:Kolanut.jpg

Macadamia

File:Macadamia nuts on tree.JPG

Malabar almond

File:Terminalia catappa fruits at various stages of ripeness-1.JPG

Malabar chestnut

File:Pachira aquatica (fruit) edit1.jpg

Mamoncillo

File:Melicoccus bijugatus.jpg

Mongongo

File:Mongongo nut2.png

Ogbono

File:OGBONO.JPG

Paradise nut

File:Sapucaia1.jpg

Pili

File:Pili nut (Canarium ovatum).jpg

Pistachio

File:Pistachios in shells.jpg

Walnuts, including:

File:Black Walnut Juglans nigra Nut 2400px.jpg

Water chestnut

File:Trapa natans seeds.jpg

Nut-like gymnosperm seeds

Cycads

File:Cycas circinalis.jpg

Ginkgo

File:Gingko fg01.jpg

Gnetum

File:Gnetum gnemon BotGardBln1105C.JPG

Juniper

File:Juniperseeds.jpg

Monkey-puzzle

File:Araucaria araucana0.jpg
Pine nuts, including

File:KoreanPineSeeds.jpg

Food We Eat : Top 50 Vegetarian Foods

Here are the delicious top 50 Vegetarian foods from across the world. Hope this makes you hungry 🙂 Eat Well Live Well. 

Which is your favourite among these? or any other food? Please comment below…


Courtesy : www.sbs.com.au ( You can learn how to cook all these foods from this website)

Food We Eat : Flags From Foods :) [18 countries]

Photographs by Australian advertising agency WHYBIN\TBWA from the Sydney International Food Festival, Australia’s largest festival ever attended by a million last year. As a part of promotion, the creative team has recreated 18 national flags of countries  Australia, Spain, Italy, Vietnam, Japan, South Korea, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States of America, Thailand, Indonesia, Switzerland, France, China, Lebanon, Greece, India and Brazil using their traditional ingrdients. 

Hope this will be a delight to you. Enjoy the pictures 🙂 Why not try something like this in our place?

Brazil’s flag made from banana leaf, limes, pineapple and passion fruit.

Brazil’s flag made from banana leaf, limes, pineapple and passion fruit.

India’s flag made from curries, rice, and pappadum wafer.

India’s flag made from curries, rice, and pappadum wafer.

Greece’s flag made from Kalamata olives and feta cheese.

Greece’s flag made from Kalamata olives and feta cheese.

Lebanon’s flag made from lavash, fattoush and herb sprig.

Lebanon’s flag made from lavash, fattoush and herb sprig.

China’s flag made from pittaya/dragon fruit and star fruit.

China’s flag made from pittaya/dragon fruit and star fruit.

France’s flag made from Blue cheese, brie and grapes.

France’s flag made from Blue cheese, brie and grapes.

Switzerland’s flag made from charcuteries and emmental.

Switzerland’s flag made from charcuteries and emmental.

Indonesia’s flag made from spicy curries and rice (Sambal).

Indonesia’s flag made from spicy curries and rice (Sambal).

Thailand’s flag made from sweet chilli sauce, shredded coconut and blue swimmer crab.

Thailand’s flag made from sweet chilli sauce, shredded coconut and blue swimmer crab.

United States of America’s flag made from hot dogs, ketchup, and mustard or cheese.

United States of America’s flag made from hot dogs, ketchup, and mustard or cheese.

United Kingdom’s flag made from scone, cream and jams.

United Kingdom’s flag made from scone, cream and jams.

Turkey’s flag made from Turkish Delights (Lokum).

Turkey’s flag made from Turkish Delights (Lokum).

South Korea’s flag made from Kimbap and sauces.

South Korea’s flag made from Kimbap and sauces.

Japan’s flag made from tuna and rice.

Japan’s flag made from tuna and rice.

Vietnam’s flag made from rambutan, lychee and starfruit.

Vietnam’s flag made from rambutan, lychee and starfruit.

Italy’s flag made from Basil, pasta, and tomatoes.

Italy’s flag made from Basil, pasta, and tomatoes.

Spain’s flag made from chorizo and rice.

Spain’s flag made from chorizo and rice.

Australia’s flag made from meat pie and sauce.

Australia’s flag made from meat pie and sauce.

____

Courtesy and Source : Twisted Sifter

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