Everyday is Earth Day!

Image Courtesy : Steve Sack

Image Courtesy : Steve Sack


Disclaimer : We do not own any of these cartoons / Images. All rights reserved to the respective artists. Shared here for awareness and educational purposes only.

Picture Speaks : Factory Farming

Voiceless is an independent, non-profit think tank focused on raising awareness of animals suffering in factory farming and the kangaroo industry in Australia. Their vision is for a world in which animals are treated with respect and compassion.

Please support them. Here is their website: Voiceless

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Earth Our Home Too : Tapirs

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A tapir is a large herbivorous mammal, similar in shape to a pig, with a short,prehensile snout. Tapirs inhabit jungle and forest regions of South America, Central America, and Southeastern Asia. The five extant species of tapirs are the Brazilian tapir, the Malayan tapir, the Baird’s tapir, the kabomani tapir, and the mountain tapir. The four species that have been evaluated (the Brazilian, Malayan, Baird’s and mountain tapir) have all been classified as endangered or vulnerable. Their closest relatives are the other odd-toed ungulates, including horses and rhinoceroses.

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Tapirs weigh from 500-700 pounds and can reach 29-42 height at shoulders. Malayan tapir is the largest and Mountain tapir is the smallest species.

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Closest relatives of tapirs are horses and rhinos.

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Tapirs have not changed much for tens of millions of years.

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Tapirs have 4 toes on their front feet and 3 toes on their back feet.

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Tapirs are herbivorous. They eat leaves and fruit twice a day.

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These animals are ecologically very important because they disperse seeds with their feces as they move from one location to another.

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Their snout is a fusion of nose and upper lip. It facilitates eating. Tapirs use it to grab leaves from the nearby branches, pick up the fruit from the ground or to find aquatic plant on the bottom of the water.

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Group of tapirs is called a “candle”.

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Tapirs communicate verbally, via high pitched sounds and non-verbally, via urine droppings. By sniffing and recognizing urine marks, tapirs can know if there are other tapirs in the area.

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They like to spend time in the water because water cools them down and helps them in removing parasites.

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Tapirs can spend few minutes under the water. They can use their snouts as snorkels if they need to hide under the water longer period of time (in the case of danger).

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Jaguars, tigers, crocodile and anacondas hunt tapirs.

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After 13 months of pregnancy, one calf will be born. As long as mother produces milk, young tapir will eat it.

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Young tapirs have specific yellow and white stripes and spots on the reddish-brown fur which provide excellent camouflage. After few months (when they lose these marks), they look like miniature version of adult animal.

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Tapirs live 25-30 years in the wild and over 30 years in captivity.

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Source and Courtesy:

Softschools.com, Wikipedia and Click on the image for respective photographer’s profile/page

Eco Preservation : The Spotted Lake, Kliluk

Spotted Lake is a saline endorheic alkali lake located northwest of Osoyoos in the eastern Similkameen Valley of British Columbia, Canada.

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Spotted Lake is richly concentrated with various minerals. It contains dense deposits of magnesium sulfate, calcium and sodium sulphates. It also contains high concentrations of eight other minerals and lower amounts of silver and titanium.

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Most of the water in the lake evaporates over the summer, revealing colorful mineral deposits. Large “spots” on the lake appear and are colored according to the mineral composition and seasonal amount of precipitation. Magnesium sulfate, which crystallizes in the summer, is a major contributor to spot color. In the summer, remaining minerals in the lake harden to form natural “walkways” around and between the spots.

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Originally known to the First Nations of the Okanagan Valley as Kliluk, Spotted Lake was for centuries and remains revered as a sacred site thought to provide therapeutic waters. During World War I, the minerals of Spotted Lake were used in manufacturing ammunition.

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Later, the area came under the control of the Ernest Smith Family for a term of about 40 years. In 1979, Smith attempted to create interest in a spa at the lake. The First Nations responded with an effort to buy the lake, then in October 2001, struck a deal by purchasing 22 hectares of land for a total of $720,000, and contributed about 20% of the cost. The Indian Affairs Department paid the remainder.

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Today, there is a roadside sign telling visitors about the lake’s mythical healing powers. Despite a fence protecting the lake shore from the liabilities of public access, the lake can be easily seen and many visitors stop to view the site.

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Courtesy & Source : Wikipedia


Earth Our Home Too : Golden Crowned Kinglet

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The golden-crowned kinglet (Regulus satrapa) is a very small songbird.

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Adults are olive-gray on the upperparts with white underparts, with thin bills and short tails. They have white wing bars, a black stripe through the eyes and a yellow crown surrounded by black. The adult male has an orange patch in the middle of the yellow crown.

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Their breeding habitat is coniferous forests across Canada, the northeastern and western United States, Mexico and Central America. They nest in a well-concealed hanging cup suspended from a conifer branch.

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These birds migrate to the United States. Some birds are permanent residents in coastal regions and in the southern parts of their range. Northern birds remain further north in winter than the ruby-crowned kinglet.

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They forage actively in trees or shrubs, mainly eating insects, insect eggs and spiders.

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They give a series of high-pitched calls on a single note, and tend not to fear human approach.

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The four continental Regulus species all have very large ranges and populations. The two single-island endemics are common within their habitat, and are not thought to be at risk. All kinglets are therefore classed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.