Speech : Aim of Education by Paul Yingling

This is one of the meaningful speech on Education. A lot of insights to ponder upon.

Humanity : Counterattacking Discrimination

This is one intriguing as well as annoying incident happened in the Delhi Metro, shared by a Facebook user. He in fact was a fellow passenger who witnessed this and shared it with the world. Here it is in his words

” This morning I saw a well-dressed senior citizen, wearing Ray-Ban sun glasses, who boarded the Delhi Metro and went towards a pair of seats reserved for senior citizens. In it where two young boys in their early twenties; one was a well-dressed boy wearing a conspicuous headphone and listening to songs and the other was a boy who looked like a construction worker, wearing rubber slippers and slightly soiled due to some laborious task he had just completed.

The supposed construction worker had a dark complexion and was sleeping when the old man entered the metro. On seeing the old man, the boy with the headphones, immediately vacated his seat while the supposed construction worker, was still sleeping. The old man, woke him up and asked him to get up. Caught unaware, the boy saw the vacant seat next to him (because it had been vacated) and asked the old man to take that seat, but the old man refused and he insisted that the boy gets up so that he can sit with the boy wearing the headphones.

The supposed construction worker refused and told the old man that he can take the vacant seat. Suddenly, the old man turned caustic and told the boy that he is sleeping early in the morning and added that he must be from Bihar. He also added that he will take the boy to task in the next station.

The old man’s aversion to share a seat with someone whom he thought doesn’t fit his stature was so evident and quite nauseating. Unperturbed by the retort and the gaze of the onlookers, the dark complexioned boy firmly said that it doesn’t matter where he is from, he knows what his rights are, and he isn’t scared of the old man’s intimidation.

The old man grudgingly took the seat next to the boy and the boy continued sitting with a calm demeanor. A few stations later, when a lady boarded the train, the young boy vacated the seat for her and the old man looked like a fool. The boy’s response and his confidence levels were so impressive, that I was couldn’t resist but walk up to him to shake hands with him and appreciate him for his behavior. I found out that his name is Arjun and I did not bother to know where he is from.

Some of us still carry the old and disgusting colonial mindsets of discrimination and deprivation even today, many of us are onlookers (like how I was today), and that’s even worse. But it is people like Arjun who assert their rights, break the false walls that many build and many more like us allow them to be built. But if individuals do not assert themselves and if the society doesn’t actively support people asserting their just rights, how will India as a nation assert itself?

That’s why I believe that Arjun is an everyday hero.”

Written by – Prasanna Karthik R


Courtesy : Prasanna Karthick via Facebook.

A Good Teacher Can Change Life

How Important a Good teacher in every students’ life? Well, the right teacher is powerful enough to change lives of many students positive. If you are a Teacher, be a Good Teacher not just for marks but for their Life. If you are a Student, try finding the right teacher for your Life.

Do you want some Good Mentor? Do you want to be a Good Teacher? 

A teacher need not be always a person who teaches in the school, you can be a Teacher if you have that passion to share your Knowledge and Wisdom You can join our forum here and be a part of our initiatives, wherever you are in the world. You can help the Kids, just by sharing what you know / find / come across and it may help any Kid who needs it.


Video Courtesy : Ministry of Education Singapore (via) YouTube

Know : Two Reasons to Stop Drinking Milk (Part 2 of 2)

They are huge, but very docile. The native breed is creamy white in colour, with a distinctive hump. Sometimes the pious people of India can be seen feeding a roadside cow with a carrot or chappati or some water.

The two reasons to stop drinking milk are The Health perspective and The Moral perspective to save the cows. This is the second part we see the Moral perspective

Even if the Indian cow eats paper and plastic surprisingly there is negligible effect on its milk and urine as they take all ill effects in its own body.

Even if the Indian cow eats paper and plastic surprisingly there is negligible effect on its milk and urine as they take all ill effects in its own body.

What happens in Dairy farming?

Crated_CalvescowFor many people, dairy farming conjures up images of small herds of cows leisurely grazing on open pastures. Although scenes like this still exist, most milk is produced by cows raised in intensive production systems. Some cows are housed indoors year-round and lactating cows are often kept restrained in tie stalls or stanchions.

Although they don’t reach mature size until at least 4 years old, dairy cows first give birth at about 2 years of age and are usually bred again beginning at about 60 days after giving birth, to maintain a yearly schedule.

Most dairy calves are removed from their mothers immediately after birth. The males are mainly sold for veal or castrated and raised for beef. “Bob veal” calves are killed as soon as a few days after birth; those used to produce “special-fed veal” are typically kept tethered in individual stalls until slaughtered at about 16 to 20 weeks of age. The female calves are commonly subjected to tail docking, dehorning, and the removal of “extra” teats. Until weaned at 8 weeks of age, most female calves are fed colostrum, then a milk replacer or unsaleable waste milk. Each year hundreds of thousands of these female calves die between 48 hours and 8 weeks of age, mostly due to scours, diarrhea, and other digestive problems.

What about Cows in India?

People for Ethical Treatment of Animals (Peta), backed up by The Independent’s own investigation, which reveals the Indian treatment of its holiest animal as a scandal of cruelty, greed and corruption.

The cow’s special status in India is enshrined in law. Some States allow the slaughter of cattle with restrictions like a “fit-for-slaughter” certificate which may be issued depending on factors like age and gender of cattle, continued economic viability etc. Others completely ban cattle slaughter, while there is no restriction in a few states, most notably Kerala. By default, Bulls and bullocks and she-buffaloes are protected up to 15 years of age. But all this apparent reverence and protection masks a trade in cows and cow products which involves unbelievable barbarity and cruelty. 

The issues of slaughtering

Cows are routinely shipped to states with lower or no requirement for slaughter, even though most States make it illegal to transport the animals for slaughter across State borders. Many illegal slaughterhouses operate in large cities such as Chennai and Mumbai. While there are approximately 3,600 slaughterhouses operating legally in India, there are estimated to be over 30,000 illegal slaughterhouses.

Much of the abuse stems from the fact that the trade in and slaughter of cows is almost entirely clandestine and illegal – but the authorities which should be stopping it are routinely bribed to let it continue. There is, therefore, no scrutiny or regulation of the trade anywhere along the line. Much Indian beef finds its way to the Middle East and Europe from Kerala and Bangladesh

Some cruel stats

cow2The slaughter of cows has been banned in all Indian states and territories except West Bengal, in the north-east, and Kerala in the far south. But the main result is an appalling traffic of cattle. There is a huge amount of trafficking of cattle to both West Bengal and Kerala. The ones going to West Bengal go by truck and train and they go by the millions. The law says you cannot transport more than 4 per truck but they are putting in up to 70. When they go by train, each wagon is supposed to hold 80 to 100, but they cram in up to 900, 400 to 500 of them go out dead.

Insane practice

“In Kerala they also have a unique way of killing them – they beat their heads to a pulp with a dozen hammer blows. A well-intentioned visitor from the West, trying to improve slaughterhouse practice in Kerala, exhorted them to use stun guns, saying that the meat of an animal killed in this fashion (rather than having its throat slit) tasted sweeter. The stun guns that she left behind quickly broke and fell into disuse, but the belief that the meat was sweeter took hold – which explains this horrible method of slaughtering.” 

US Statistics

cow_downed6Between 1940 and 2012, the average amount of milk produced per cow rose from 2 tons per year to 10 tons. Although genetic selection and feeding are used to increase production efficiency, cows do not adapt well to high milk yields or their high grain diets.7 Metabolic disorders are common, and millions of cows suffer from mastitis (a very painful infection of the udder), lameness, and infertility problems.

The term “downer” refers to an animal who is too injured, weak, or sick to stand and walk. The exact number of downer cattle on U.S. farms or feedlots or sent to slaughter facilities is difficult to ascertain, but estimates approach 500,000 animals per year; most are dairy cows. Complications associated with calving and injuries from slipping and falling are leading causes, and the condition most often occurs within one day of giving birth.

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Courtesy : ajitvadakayil.blogspot.comveganoutreach.orgindependent.co.uk

Read the Part 1: The Health perspective to stop drinking milk


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Documentary : Know Austria

250px-EU-Austria.svgAustria officially the Republic of Austria (German: Österreich), is a federal republic and a landlocked country of roughly 8.47 million people in Central Europe. It is bordered by the Czech Republic and Germany to the north, Hungary and Slovakia to the east, Slovenia andItaly to the south, and Switzerland and Liechtenstein to the west. The territory of Austria covers 83,855 square kilometres (32,377 sq mi) and has a temperate and alpine climate. Austria’s terrain is highly mountainous due to the presence of the Alps; only 32% of the country is below 500 metres (1,640 ft), and its highest point is 3,798 metres (12,461 ft). The majority of the population speak local Bavarian dialects of German as their native language, and German in its standard form is the country’s official languageOther local official languages areHungarianBurgenland Croatian, and Slovene.

The origins of modern-day Austria date back to the time of the Habsburg dynasty when the vast majority of the country was a part of the Holy Roman Empire. From the time of the Reformation, many Northern German princes, resenting the authority of the Emperor, used Protestantism as a flag of rebellion. The Thirty Years War, the influence of the Kingdom of Sweden, and the rise of the Kingdom of Prussia, as well as the Napoleonic invasions, all weakened the power of the Emperor in the North of Germany, but in the South, and in non-German areas of the austriaEmpire, the Emperor and Catholicism maintained control. During the 17th and 18th centuries, Austria became one of the great powers of Europe and, in response to the coronation of Napoleon as the Emperor of the French, the Austrian Empire was officially proclaimed in 1804. Following Napoleon’s defeat, Prussia emerged as Austria’s chief competitor for rule of a larger Germany. Austria’s defeat by Prussia at the Battle of Königgrätz, during the Austro-Prussian War of 1866 cleared the way for Prussia to assert control over the rest of Germany. In 1867, the empire was reformed into Austria-Hungary. After the defeat of France in the 1870 Franco-Prussian War, Austria was left out of the formation of a new German Empire, although in the following decades its politics, and its foreign policy, increasingly converged with those of the Prussian-led Empire. During the 1914 July Crisis that followed the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, the German Empire guided Austria in issuing the ultimatum to Serbia that led to the declaration of the First World War.

After the collapse of the Habsburg (Austro-Hungarian) Empire in 1918 at the end of World War I, Austria adopted and used the name the Republic of German-Austria (Deutschösterreich, later Österreich) in an attempt for union with Germany, but was forbidden due to the Treaty of Saint-Germain-en-Laye (1919). The First Austrian Republic was established in 1919. In the 1938 Anschluss, Austria was occupied and annexed by Nazi GermanyThis lasted until the end of World War II in 1945, after which Germany was occupied by the Allies and Austria’s former democratic constitution was restored. In 1955, the Austrian State Treaty re-established Austria as a sovereign state, ending the occupation. In the same year, the Austrian Parliamentcreated the Declaration of Neutrality which declared that the Second Austrian Republic would become permanently neutral.

Today, Austria is a semi-presidential, parliamentary representative democracy comprising nine federal states. The capital and largest city, with a population exceeding 1.7 million, is Vienna. Austria is one of the richest countries in the world, with a nominal per capita GDP of $46,330 (2012 est.). The country has developed a high standard of living and in 2011 was ranked 19th in the world for its Human Development Index. Austria has been a member of the United Nations since 1955, joined the European Union in 1995, and is a founder of the OECD. Austria also signed the Schengen Agreement in 1995, and adopted the European currency, the euro, in 1999

Bonus Video :

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Courtesy : Youtube and Wikipedia