Know : World Trade Organization (WTO)

Brief Overview:

The World Trade Organization (WTO) is the only international organization dealing with the global rules of trade between nations. Its main function is to ensure that trade flows as smoothly, predictably and freely as possible.

The result is assurance. Consumers and producers know that they can enjoy secure supplies and greater choice of the finished products, components, raw materials and services that they use. Producers and exporters know that foreign markets will remain open to them.

The result is also a more prosperous, peaceful and accountable economic world. Virtually all decisions in the WTO are taken by consensus among all member countries and they are ratified by members’ parliaments. Trade friction is channelled into the WTO’s dispute settlement process where the focus is on interpreting agreements and commitments, and how to ensure that countries’ trade policies conform with them. That way, the risk of disputes spilling over into political or military conflict is reduced.

By lowering trade barriers, the WTO’s system also breaks down other barriers between peoples and nations.

At the heart of the system — known as the multilateral trading system — are the WTO’s agreements, negotiated and signed by a large majority of the world’s trading nations, and ratified in their parliaments. These agreements are the legal ground-rules for international commerce. Essentially, they are contracts, guaranteeing member countries important trade rights. They also bind governments to keep their trade policies within agreed limits to everybody’s benefit.

The agreements were negotiated and signed by governments. But their purpose is to help producers of goods and services, exporters, and importers conduct their business.

The goal is to improve the welfare of the peoples of the 159 member states.

   Members,
   Members, dually represented by the European Union
   Observers
   Non-members

The History : 

The World Trade Organization came into being in 1995. One of the youngest of the international organizations, the WTO is the successor to the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) established in the wake of the Second World War. So while the WTO is still young, the multilateral trading system that was originally set up under GATT is well over 50 years old. (click here to read the complete history)

In 2000, new talks started on agriculture and services. These have now been incorporated into a broader agenda launched at the fourth WTO Ministerial Conference in Doha, Qatar, in November 2001.

The work programme, the Doha Development Agenda (DDA), adds negotiations and other work on non-agricultural tariffs, trade and environment, WTO rules such as anti-dumping and subsidies, investment, competition policy, trade facilitation, transparency in government procurement, intellectual property, and a range of issues raised by developing countries as difficulties they face in implementing the present WTO agreements.

It does this by:
Administering trade agreements
Acting as a forum for trade negotiations
Settling trade disputes
Reviewing national trade policies
Assisting developing countries in trade policy issues, through technical assistance and training programmes
Cooperating with other international organizations

Organizational Structure

The WTO has about 150 members, accounting for about 95% of world trade. Around 30 others are negotiating membership.

Decisions are made by the entire membership. This is typically by consensus. A majority vote is also possible but it has never been used in the WTO, and was extremely rare under the WTO’s predecessor, GATT. The WTO’s agreements have been ratified in all members’ parliaments.

The WTO’s top level decision-making body is the Ministerial Conference which meets at least once every two years.

Below this is the General Council (normally ambassadors and heads of delegation in Geneva, but sometimes officials sent from members’ capitals) which meets several times a year in the Geneva headquarters. The General Council also meets as the Trade Policy Review Body and the Dispute Settlement Body.

At the next level, the Goods Council, Services Council and Intellectual Property (TRIPS) Council report to the General Council.

Numerous specialized committees, working groups and working parties deal with the individual agreements and other areas such as the environment, development, membership applications and regional trade agreements.

Secretariat

The WTO Secretariat, based in Geneva, has around 600 staff and is headed by a director-general (Roberto Azevêdo). Its annual budget is roughly 160 million Swiss francs. It does not have branch offices outside Geneva. Since decisions are taken by the members themselves, the Secretariat does not have the decision-making role that other inter-Secretariat, Genevanational bureaucracies are given.

The WTO agreements
How can you ensure that trade is as fair as possible, and as free as is practical? By negotiating rules and abiding by them. (Click here to read more about the WTO agreements)

The WTO is ‘rules-based’; its rules are negotiated agreements.

Overview: a navigational guide
Tariffs: more bindings and closer to zero
Agriculture: fairer markets for farmers
Standards and safety
Textiles: back in the mainstream
Services: rules for growth and investment
Intellectual property: protection and enforcement
Anti-dumping, subsidies, safeguards: contingencies, etc
Non-tariff barriers: red tape, etc
Plurilaterals: of minority interest
Trade policy reviews: ensuring transparency

10 benefits of the WTO trading system

From the money in our pockets and the goods and services that we use, to a more peaceful world — the WTO and the trading system offer a range of benefits, some well-known, others not so obvious.

1. The system helps promote peace
2. Disputes are handled constructively
3. Rules make life easier for all
4. Freer trade cuts the costs of living
5. It provides more choice of products and qualities
6. Trade raises incomes
7. Trade stimulates economic growth
8. The basic principles make life more efficient
9. Governments are shielded from lobbying
10. The system encourages good government

10 common misunderstandings about the WTO

Is it a dictatorial tool of the rich and powerful? Does it destroy jobs? Does it ignore the concerns of health, the environment and development?  Emphatically no. Criticisms of the WTO are often based on fundamental misunderstandings of the way the WTO works.

1. WTO dictates?
2. 
Blindly for trade?
3. 
Ignores development?
4. 
Anti-green?
5. 
Anti-health?
6. 
Wrecks jobs?
7. 
Small left out?
8. 
Tool of lobbies?
9. 
Weak forced to join?
10. 
Undemocratic?

____

Courtesy and Source : www.wto.org, Wikipedia and Google

Know : List of Secular, Non Secular and Ambiguous Countries

Secularmap

SECULAR COUNTRIES

North America

Africa

Canada Angola
Cuba Benin
Honduras  Botswana
Mexico Burkina Faso
United States of America  Burundi
South America Cameroon
Brazil Cape Verde
Chile Chad
Colombia Republic of the Congo
Ecuador Ethiopia
Peru Gabon
Uruguay The Gambia
Venezuela Guinea
Europe Guinea-Bissau
Austria Liberia
Albania Mali
Belarus Namibia
Belgium  Senegal
Bosnia and Herzegovina Rwanda
Bulgaria South Africa
Croatia  
Czech Republic  
Estonia

Asia

France Azerbaijan
Hungary China
Ireland East Timor 
Italy Georgia
Latvia India
Macedonia Japan
Netherlands Kazakhstan
Poland Kyrgyzstan
Portugal Laos
Romania Lebanon
Russia Nepal
Serbia North Korea
Slovakia Philippines
Slovenia Singapore
Spain South Korea
Sweden Syria
Turkey Taiwan Taiwan
Ukraine Tajikistan

Oceania

Turkey
Australia  Turkmenistan
Federated States of Micronesia Vietnam
New Zealand  

Ambiguous /Without Data 

Argentina

Bangladesh (ambiguous data, – Constitution states that Bangladesh is both Islamic and secular.

Finland 
Germany 
Indonesia
Lebanon 
Malaysia 
Myanmar 
Norway
Sri Lanka 
Switzerland 
Thailand 
United Kingdom 

Non Secular / Religious

Afghanistan
Algeria
Alsace-Moselle
Argentina
Bahrain
Bangladesh* (ambiguous data, – Constitution states that Bangladesh is both Islamic and secular.
Bhutan 
Brunei
Cambodia
Comoros
Costa Rica
Denmark 
Djibouti
Egypt
England
Georgia
Greece
Iceland 
Iran 
Iraq
Israel
Jordan
Kuwait
Libya
Liechtenstein
Malaysia
Maldives
Malta
Mauritania
Monaco
Morocco
Mount Athos 
Norway
Oman
Pakistan
Qatar
Saudi Arabia
Somalia
Sri Lanka
Tunisia
Tuvalu 
United Arab Emirates
Vatican City
Yemen

Former secular countries

Bangladesh (1971-1977)
Iran(1925-1979)
Madagascar (1960–2007)
Iraq (1932–1968)

Courtesy & Source : Wikipedia Link1, Link2


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