A Personality Test with a Difference

Personality test

One of the basic rules of this test is to write what you feel and what first comes to mind. It’s fine if you have the same answers to different questions. Do not read all at once! Read the questions one by one and do not rush. It will not be so interesting to see the next question if you are still writing the answer to the previous one. Well, if a pen and a piece of paper are in front of you, then let’s begin!

1. You are peering into the sea, what do you feel? Focus only on your first impression. You can close your eyes to better feel it…

2. You are walking through the woods and look at the ground. Write down what you feel.

3. What do you feel when looking at flying seagulls? It’s all right if in this case you make up with a quick response.

4. What about a herd of horses? Write the first thing that comes to mind, avoid thinking for too much time.

5. You are in the desert, standing by the wall with a small hole, behind which you see the oasis. What are your actions? Don’t just write your thoughts and feelings, but focus on what you would do in this situation.

6. You are still in the desert, completely exhausted, and suddenly see a water jug. Once again, your actions are what matters in this question. Your answer may sound banal, but still write it down.

7. You are lost in the woods in the evening and see a house with lights on. Write what you’re going to do.

8. You’re in the fog. Once more, focus on actions and write down how you would behave.

INTERPRETATION

1. Your attitude to life, emotions, sensations.

2. The way you feel in your own family.

3. Your attitude towards women.

4. Your attitude towards men.

5. Your basic life strategy and goal. The way you solve your problems.

6. How selective you are in your love life. Choice of a partner.

7. Your readiness for marriage.

8. Your attitude to death.

Credits: Anna, LearningMind

Know : National Anthem | Afghanistan

600px-Flag_of_Afghanistan.svgThe Afghan National Anthem (Pashto: ملی سرود‎ – Milli Surood; Persian: سرود ملی‎ – “Surūd-e Millī”) was adopted and officially announced by a Loya Jirga in May 2006. According to article 20 of the Afghan Constitution, the national anthem shall be in Pashto with the mention of “God is Greatest” as well as the names of the various tribes of Afghanistan. The lyrics were written by Abdul Bari Jahani and the music was written by German-Afghan composer Babrak Wassa (de)

Milli Surood
Original Pashto Lyrics Pashto Transliteration Dari Translation Dari Transliteration English Translation
First stanza
دا وطن افغانستان دی
دا عزت د هر افغان دی
کور د سولې، کور د تورې
هر بچی يې قهرمان دی
Dā watan Afğānistān di
Dā izat da har Afğān di
Kor da sole, kor da tūre
Har bačay ye qahramān di
این وطن افغانستان است
این عزت هر افغان است
میهن صلح، جایگاه شمشیر
هر فرزندش قهرمان است
īn watan Afğānestān ast
īn ezat-e har Afğān ast
mīhan-e solh, jāygāh-e šamšīr
har farzandeš qahramān ast
This land is Afghanistan!
It is the pride of every Afghan.
The land of peace, the land of the sword.
Its sons are all brave.
Second stanza
دا وطن د ټولو کور دی
د بلوڅو، د ازبکو
د پښتون او هزاره وو
د ترکمنو، د تاجکو
Dā watan da ṭolo kor di
Da Balotso, da Uzbəko
Da Pax̌tūn aw Hazārawo
Da Turkməno, da Tājəko
این وطن میهن همه است
از بلوچ، از ازبکها
از پشتون، هزاره‌ها
از ترکمن و تاجیکها
īn watan mīhan-e hame ast
az Baloč, az Uzbakhā
az Paštūn, Hazārahā
az Turkman o Tājīkhā
This is the country of every tribe,
The land of Baloch andUzbeks,
Pashtuns and Hazaras,
Turkmen and Tajiks.
Third stanza
ور سره عرب، ګوجر دي
پاميريان، نورستانيان
براهوي دي، قزلباش دي
هم ايماق، هم پشه يان
Wər sara Arab, Gūjər dī
Pāmīryān, Nūristānyān
Brāhawī dī, Qizilbāš dī
Ham Aymāq, ham Pašayān
هم عرب و گوجرها
پامیری‌، نورستانیها
براهویی است و قزلباش
هم ایماق و پشه‌ئیان
ham Arab o Gūjarhā
Pāmīrī, Nūristānīhā
Brāhawī ast o Qizilbāš
ham Aymāq o Pašaiyān
With them, Arabs andGujjars,
PamirisNuristanis,
Brahuis and Qizilbash,
Also Aimaqs andPashayis.
Fourth stanza
دا هيواد به تل ځلېږي
لکه لمر پر شنه اسمان
په سينه کې د آسيا به
لکه زړه وي جاويدان
Dā hīwād ba təl źaleǵī
Ləka lmar pər šnə asmān
Pə sīna ke da Āsyā ba
Ləka zṛə wī jāwīdān
این کشور همیشه تابان خواهد بود
مثل آفتاب در آسمان کبود
در سینهٔ آسیا
مثل قلب جاویدان
īn kešwar hamīše tābān xāhad būd
mesl-e āftāb dar āsemān-e kabūd
dar sīna-ye āsyā
mesl-e qalb jāwīdān
This Land will shine for ever,
Like the sun in the blue sky.
In the chest of Asia,
It will remain as the heart forever.
Fifth stanza
نوم د حق مو دی رهبر
وايو الله اکبر
وايو الله اکبر
وايو الله اکبر
Nūm da haq mo day rahbar
Wāyū Allāhu Akbar
Wāyū Allāhu Akbar
Wāyū Allāhu Akbar
نام حق است ما را رهبر
می‌گوییم الله اکبر
می‌گوییم الله اکبر
می‌گوییم الله اکبر
nām-e haq ast mā rā rahbar
mīgūyīm Allāh-o-Akbar
mīgūyīm Allāh-o-Akbar
mīgūyīm Allāh-o-Akbar
We will follow the one God;
We all say, Allah is great!
We all say, Allah is great!

____

NOTE: National Anthems of various Countries are presented here (on alphabetical order) for educational purposes only with a good intention to spread peace and harmony among nations and mutually respecting one another. In no way the comments should hurt the other country’s sentiments and patriotism. Every Country has its own national pride. Let us value it.

Source and Courtesy: Wikipedia and YouTube

Know : Max Retail Price (MRP) Violations & Complaints : Numbers

YOU CAN COMPLAINT IF YOU NEED TO PAY MORE THAN MRP, Here are Contact Numbers…

MRPAll packaged goods in India, ranging from beverages to mobile phones to cosmetics, are stamped with a price dictated by the manufacturer as being the maximum allowable cost to the consumer.
Today’s version of MRP was adapted in December 1990. Previous to this date, manufacturer’s had the option of printing the price of their commodities in two ways:

  • ->Retail price Rs, local taxes extra
  • ->Maximum retail price Rs, inclusive of all taxes

Allegations from consumers and organizations that merchants were over-charging by adding additional local taxes on products brought about the change to MRP in 1990. Merchants were tacking on charges under the guise of local taxes when the actual rates were much lower. Consumers could pay one price for a product and a much higher or lower price in a neighboring town. Thus the change was made by the Ministry of Civil Supplies and its executive wing, the Department of Legal Metrology to the Standards of Weights & Measures Act (Packaged Commodities’ Rules). The change was meant to end complaints and confusion of over-charging to consumers for products. There have since been numerous complaints regarding this system of pricing with regards to under-charging of goods relative to MRP.

What does this mean for you?
In theory you should check the MRP on products before purchasing. Some merchants will charge less than the printed price at their discretion. If this happens to me, I make a mental note to return to that store in the future. On the opposite side, some merchants will try to charge more. If questioned, you may get a response that a newer stock has since come into their store with a revised MRP under which they are selling the old stock. While this is not allowable, there isn’t much you can do unless the merchant feels you aren’t willing to ease on the lower price. Another tactic to watch for is a merchant quoting you a price which he/she will then offer a discount on. Being giddy about the prospect of receiving a discount, you may not check the MRP until you’ve reached your destination. Unwrap your item to discover the MRP is actually less than the discounted price you paid.

What can you do to protect yourself?

  • Obtain full information regarding quality and price before making any purchases.
  • Be careful, about false and /or misleading advertisement.
  • Purchase only when you need and do not purchase in a hurry.
  • Do not buy blindly. Demand full information before you buy.
  • Do not compromise on the quality of goods and services and its quality. Purchase only quality products.
  • Ask for Bills always, bills that have enough proof that you can legally claim that you have made the purchase from that particular retailer.

You can file a complaint with the District Forum if you feel you have been over-charged. However, the opposing party has 30 days to file their version of events and can even extend this for an additional 15 day period. As a tourist you have very little recourse legally unless you are a long term traveler in one location.

Do keep one thing in mind. As of 2003, hotels are not subject to the MRP act. Packed goods purchased within a hotel can be sold at the property’s discretion.
Keep your eyes open and always check prices cause your travel budget only goes so far.

For Complaining in India…

S.No. Contact Details of the Concerned Department
1. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Andhra Pradesh,

No. 209, PWD Building,

Gandhi Nagar, Hyderabad,

Andhra Pradesh – 500 380

Ph: 040-27612170

Fax: 040-27613667

HYDERABAD – 500 030

2. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Andaman & Nicobar Island,

Port Blair – 744 101

Ph: 03192-232321

PORT BLAIR – 744 101

3. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Arunachal Pradesh,

Old Secretaraiat  Complex,

Nagarlagun –791110

Ph: 0360-2350837, 2248620, 2351150

Fax:0360-2350837

4. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Assam,

Ulubari,

Guwahati-781007

Ph: 0361-2470992

5. Office of Dept., of Agriculture

Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Bihar, Raja Bajar,

Beli Road,

Patna – 800 014

Ph: 0612-2286258

Fax 0612 -2224365:

6. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Chandigarh Administration,

Old Architect Building, West Wing,

Sector 19-B,

Chandigarh

Ph: 0172-2741341

Fax: 0172-741341,2741503

7. The Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Govt of Chattisgarh,

Raipur-492001 

Ph.0771-2524294/2343274/2343275

8. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Dadra &  Nagar Haveli Administration,

Silvasa – 396 230

Ph: 02639-242721

9. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Daman & Diu Administration,

Daman – 396 220

Ph: 02638-254685

10. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of India Delhi, NCT of Delhi,

117-118, C-Block, Vikas Bhavan,

N.Delhi – 110 002

Ph: 011-23379266, 23379262

Fax: 011- 23379267:

11. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Goa,

Panaji – 403 001

Ph: 0832-2426432

Fax:0832-2220218

12. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Gujarat,

Tolmap Bhavan, Opp. Sarang Pur Water Tank,

Ahmedabad, Gujarat – 380 002

Ph: 079-22114177

Fax: 079-22114234

AHMEDABAD – 380 002 

13. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Haryana,

Footwall chowk, Dist., industries center building ,

Ambala Cantt.

Ph: 0172-708581, 701366

14. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Himachal Pradesh,

Apurti Bhavan, 1st Floor,

Block No. 42, SDA Commercial Complex,

Kasumpti Shimla – 171 009

Ph: 0177-2625345

15 Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Jammu & Kashmir,

Revenue Complex Building,

Takkipora, Srinagar

Ph: 0194-473828

16. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Jammu & Kashmir,

Civil Sectt.

Block-I/16, Jammu

Ph: 0191-2549682

Fax:0191-2566188,2458693

17. Joint Agriculture Director cum

Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Govt of Jharkhand ,Lakshmi Nivas,

Krishi Bahvan, Kanke Road, Ranchi – 834006

0651 230923 (fax)

18. Sri Ramachandra

Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Karnataka,

No.1, Ali Askar Road,

P.B. No. 175, Bangalore, Karnataka – 560 052

Ph: 080-22253500  26682715 (Res)

Fax 080-22259024

BANGALORE-560052

19. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Kerala,

Vikas Bhavan,

Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala – 695 033

Ph: 0471-2303821    2310321  (Res)

Fax:0471-2305996

20. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Lakshdweep,

Kavaratti – 682 555

Ph: 04896-262112

Fax:04896- 263298

KAVARATTI – 682 555

21. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Madhya Pradesh,

Near Dak Bhavan,

Bhopal-Hoshangabad Road,

Bhopal – 462 011

Ph: 0755-2551017;

. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Maharashtra,

Government Barrack No. 7,

Free Press Journal Marg,

Mumbai – 400 021

Ph: 022-22023354

Fax: 022-22024950

23 Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Manipur,

2nd MR Gate, North ADC Lane,

Imphal – 795 001

Ph: 0385-311687,

24. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Meghalaya,

Shillong Temple Road,

Lower Lachuier,

Shillong – 793 001

Ph: 0364-222576

25. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Mizoram,

Aizawal

Ph: 0389-2322872, 2322572

Fax:0389-2321035

26. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Nagaland,

Kohima – 797 001

Ph: 0370-2221609

0370-2222862;    2221764(Res)

27. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Orissa,

Khandagiri,

Bhubneshwar – 751 003

Ph: 0674-4129967

Fax:0674-2402854

28. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Dy. Commissioner (Excise) and Ex-officio Under Secy.(Revenue)

Thattanchavady,

Pondicherry – 605 009

Ph: 0413-252493 (personal), 253462 (Off: with extension), 372523®

255196 (Res) Fax: 0413-253462

29. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Punjab,

17, Bays Building, Sector 17,

Chandigarh

0172-2701131

30. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Rajasthan,

Udyog Bhavan, Tilak Marg,

Jaipur – 300 001

Ph: 0141-380796, 380727

Telefax:380796

31

.

Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Sikkim,

Paljor Stadium, Paljor Stadium Road,

Gangatok – 737 101

Ph: 03592-202893;

32. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Tamil Nadu,

DMS Compound,

Teynampet, Chennai – 600 006

Ph: 044-24321 438

33 Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Tripura,

Tripura, Agartala

Ph: 0381-2325997;

34. The Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Govt of Uttaranchal, 15, Gandhi Road,

Dehradun –248001.

35. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Uttar Pradesh,

7, Walaquad Road, Lucknow – 1 (Uttar Pradesh)

Ph: 0522-2628063;

36. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of West Bengal,

45, Ganesh Chandra Avenue,

Calcutta – 700 013

Ph: 033-22364258,22256647,22520052

Courtesy : http://consumeraffairs.nic.inhttp://www.fullstopindia.com

Know : Romance Languages : List, Origin, Current Status

The Romance languages (more accurately the Romanic languages), are a group of languages known also as Latin languages, or Neo-Latin languages, and are descended from Vulgar Latin. They form a branch of the Italic languages within the Indo-European language family. The five most widely spoken Romance languages by number of native speakers are Spanish (410 million), Portuguese (220 million), French (75 million), Italian (60 million), and Romanian (25 million). The larger have many non-native speakers; this is especially the case for French, which is in widespread use throughout Central and West Africa and the Maghreb region.

The Romance languages developed from Latin in the sixth to ninth centuries. Today, there are more than 800 million native speakers worldwide, mainly in Europe and the Americas and many smaller regions scattered throughout the world, as well as large numbers of non-native speakers, and widespread use as lingua franca. Because of the difficulty of imposing boundaries on a continuum, there are various counts of the Romance languages; Dalby lists 23 based on mutual intelligibility:

GalicianPortugueseSpanishAsturian-LeoneseAragoneseCatalanGasconProvençalGallo-WallonFrenchFranco-Provençal,  Romansh,  Ladin,  Friulian,  Venetian,  Lombard,  Corsican, ItalianNeapolitanSicilianSardinianDalmatianIstro-RomanianAromanian, and Daco-Romanian.

In several of these cases, more than one variety has been standardized, and is therefore considered a distinct language in the popular conception; this is true for example with Asturian and Leonese as well as Napolitan and Sicilian.

Origins

romance language origin

Romance languages are the continuation of Vulgar Latin, the popular and colloquial sociolect of Latin spoken by soldiers, settlers and merchants of the Roman Empire, as distinguished from the Classical form of the language spoken by the Roman upper classes, the form in which the language was generally written. Between 350 BC and AD 150, the expansion of the Empire, together with its administrative and educational policies, made Latin the dominant native language in continental Western Europe. Latin also exerted a strong influence in southeastern Britainthe Roman province of Africa, and the Balkans north of the Jireček Line.

During the Empire’s decline, and after its fragmentation and collapse in the fifth century, varieties of Latin began to diverge within each local area at an accelerated rate and eventually evolved into a continuum of recognizably different typologies. The overseas empires established by PortugalSpain, and France from the fifteenth century onward spread their languages to the other continents to such an extent that about two-thirds of all Romance language speakers today live outside Europe.

Despite other influences (e.g. substratum from pre-Roman languages, especially Continental Celtic languages; and superstratum from later Germanic or Slavic invasions), the phonologymorphology, and lexicon of all Romance languages are overwhelmingly evolved forms of Vulgar Latin. However, there are some notable differences between today’s Romance languages and their Roman ancestor. With only one or two exceptions, Romance languages have lost the declension system of Latin and, as a result, have SVO sentence structure and make extensive use of prepositions.

Romance Languages in Europe

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Romance Languages – World

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Lexical and grammatical similarities among the Romance languages, and between Latin and each of them, are apparent from the following examples having the same meaning:

English: She always closes the window before she dines.

Latin (Ea) semper antequam cenat fenestram claudit.
Aragonese (Ella) zarra siempre a finestra antes de cenar.
Aromanian (Ea/Nâsa) încljidi/nkidi totna firida ninti di tsinâ.
Asturian (Ella) pieslla siempres la ventana enantes de cenar.
Bergamasque (Lé) la sèra sèmper sö la finèstra prima de senà.
Bolognese (Lî) la sèra sänper la fnèstra prémma ed dsnèr.
Catalan (Ella) sempre tanca la finestra abans de sopar.
Corsican (Ella/Edda) chjode sempre u purtellu nanzu di cenà.
Emilian (Lē) la sèra sèmpar sù la fnèstra prima ad snàr.
Extremaduran (Ella) afecha siempri la ventana antis de cenal.
Franco-Provençal (Le) sarre toltin/tojor la fenétra avan de goutâ/dinar/sopar.
French Elle ferme toujours la fenêtre avant de dîner/souper.
Friulan (Jê) e siere simpri il barcon prin di cenâ.
Galician (Ela) pecha/fecha sempre a fiestra/xanela antes de cear.
Italian (Ella/Lei) chiude sempre la finestra prima di cenare.
Judaeo-Spanish Eya serra syempre la ventana antes de senar.
Ladin (Ëra) stlüj dagnora la finestra impröma de cenè. (badiot) (Ëila) stluj for l viere dan maië da cëina (gherdëina)
Leonese (Eilla) pecha siempre la ventana primeiru de cenare.
Ligurian (Le) a saera sempre u barcun primma de cenà.
Lombard(west.) (Lee) la sara sù semper la finestra primma de disnà/scenà.
Magoua (Elle) à fàrm toujour là fnèt àvan k’à manj.
Mauritian Creole Li touzur pou ferm lafnet avan (li) manze.
Milanese (Le) la sara semper sü la finestra prima de disnà.
Mirandese (Eilha) cerra siempre la bentana/jinela atrás de jantar.
Mozarabic Ella cloudet sempre la fainestra abante da cenare. (reconstructed)
Neapolitan Essa nzerra sempe ‘a fenesta primma ‘e magnà.
Norman Lli barre tréjous la crouésie devaunt de daîner.
Occitan (Ela) barra sempre/totjorn la fenèstra abans de sopar.
Picard Ale frunme tojours l’ creusèe édvint éd souper.
Piedmontese Chila a sara sèmper la fnestra dnans ëd fé sin-a/dnans ëd siné.
Portuguese Ela fecha sempre a janela antes de jantar/cear.
Romanian Ea închide totdeauna fereastra înainte de cinare.
Romansh Ella clauda/serra adina la fanestra avant ch’ella tschainia.
Sardinian Issa sèrrat sémper/sémpri sa bentàna innantis de chenàre/cenài.
Sassarese Edda sarra sempri lu balchoni primma di zinà.
Sicilian Idda chiui sempri la finestra prima di pistiari/manciari.
Spanish (Ella) siempre cierra la ventana antes de cenar.
Umbrian Essa chjude sempre la finestra prima de cena’.
Venetian Eła ła sara/sera sempre ła fenestra vanti de xenàr/disnar.
Walloon Ele sere todi li finiesse divant di soper.

Courtesy and Source : Wikipedia and Google