Know : List of Foods’ Storage Periods

 

Food-storage-shelf-items

Proper food storage helps maintain food quality by retaining flavor, color, texture and nutrients, while reducing the chance of contracting a food-borne illness. Foods can be classified into three groups.

  • Perishable foods include meat, poultry, fish, milk, eggs and many raw fruits and vegetables. All cooked foods are considered perishable foods. To store these foods for any length of time, perishable foods need to be held at refrigerator or freezer temperatures. If refrigerated, perishable foods should be used within several days.
  • Semi-perishable foods, if properly stored and handled, may remain unspoiled for six months to about one year. Flour, grain products, dried fruits and dry mixes are considered semi-perishable.
  • Staple, or non-perishable, foods such as sugar, dried beans, spices and canned goods do not spoil unless they are handled carelessly. These foods will lose quality, however, if stored over a long time, even if stored under ideal conditions.

There is no exact method to determine how long a food will maintain quality and be safe to eat, because many conditions affect the quality. The storage life of foods is affected by the:

  • freshness of the food when it reached the grocery store
  • length of time and the temperature at which it was held before purchase
  • temperature of your food storage areas
  • humidity level in your food storage areas
  • type of storage container or packaging the food is stored in
  • characteristics of the food item

 

Storage Periods for Retaining Food Quality
Food Room Temperature Refrigerator Freezer at 0°F
Milk/Milk Products
Milk 1 week 1 month
Butter 2 weeks 12 months
Canned or dry milk (unopened) 6 months
Cottage cheese 1 week 3 months
Cream 1-2 weeks
Ice cream 2-3 weeks
Margarine 1 month 12 months
Natural cheese 1 month 4-6 months
Processed cheese 1 month 4-6 months
Sour cream, buttermilk, cream cheese 2 weeks Not recommended
Yogurt 1 month
Meat
Fresh roasts, steaks, chops 3-4 days 2-3 months
Fresh livers, hearts, kidneys, other variety meats 1-2 days 3-4 months
Fresh ground meat, stew meat 1-2 days 3-4 months
Cured pork and lunch meat 1 week Not recommended
Cooked meat, gravies made with meat stock 2-3 days 2-3 months
Canned meat 1 year
Meat pies, stews, casseroles, meat salads 2-3 days 3 months
Hotdogs 1 week (opened) 2 weeks (unopened) 1-2 months
Bacon 7 days 1 month
Sausage, raw from pork, beef, turkey 1-2 days 1-2 months
Hard sausage-pepperoni, jerky sticks 2-3 weeks 1-2 months
Poultry/Eggs
Fresh poultry 2 days 6-8 months
Cooked poultry 2-3 days 6 months
Poultry stuffing 1 day
Poultry pies, stews, creamed dishes, gravies 1 day 6 months
Poultry salads 1 day
Eggs 2-4 weeks 1 year
Raw yolk, whites 2-4 days 1 year
Hardcooked eggs 1 week Not recommended
Liquid pasteurized eggs or egg substitutes 10 days (unopened) 3 days (opened) 1 year (unopened)
Egg-containing products: custards, custard sauces, puddings, custard-filled pastries or cakes 1-2 days Not recommended
Puddings, canned 1-2 days (opened)
Fish/Seafood
Fresh fish 1-2 days 3-6 months
Cooked fish 3-4 days 1 month
Fish salad 1 day
Smoked fish 10 days 4-5 weeks
Canned fish 1 year Not recommended
Dried or pickled fish 3-4 weeks
Clams, oyster (shucked) and scallops 7-9 days
Crab 7 days 2 months
Shrimp 3-5 days 6-12 months
Lobster (shelled or unshelled) 3-7 days 6-12 months
Wild Game
Venison 3-5 days 3-4 months
Rabbit, squirrel 1-2 days 12 months
Wild duck, pheasant, goose(whole) 1-2 days 6 months
Fruits
Apples Until ripe 1 month
Citrus fruits 2-6 weeks
Grapes 1-3 weeks
Melons, most varieties 1 week
Peaches, nectarines 2-3 weeks
Pears (mature but not fully ripe) 1-3 months
Pineapple, ripe 1 week
Other fresh fruit Until ripe 3-5 days 9-12 months
Canned fruit 1 year 2-4 days (opened)
Dried fruit 6 months 2-4 days (cooked)
Fruit juice concentrates 1 year
Canned fruit juices 1 year 3-4 days (opened)
Vegetables
Asparagus 2-3 days
Broccoli, brussels sprouts, green peas, green onions, lima beans, rhubarb, greens, summer squash, mushrooms 3-5 days
Cabbage, cauliflower, celery, cucumbers, snap beans, lettuce, peppers, tomatoes 1 week
Carrots, beets, parsnips, radishes, turnips 2 weeks
Corn 1 day
White potatoes, sweet potatoes, winter squash, rutabagas, dry onions 1 week (several months at 50-60°F)
Canned or dried vegetables 1 year 1-4 days (opened/cooked)
Cereal Products
Flour, white 1 year
Flour, whole or wheat 6-8 months 1 year
Rice, white 2 years
Rice, brown 6 months
Ready-to-eat cereals 1 year
Uncooked cereals 1 year
Pasta 1 year
Corn meal 1 year
Bakery Goods
Breads, baked with no preservatives 2-3 weeks 2-3 months
Breads, quick, baked 2 months
Cake, angel 6-12 months
Cake, baked, frosted 1 month
Cake, baked, unfrosted 2-4 months
Cakes, batter 1 month
Cakes, fruit 6-12 months
Cinnamon rolls, partially baked 2 months
Cookies, baked, homemade 2-3 weeks 6-12 months
Cookies, dough 1-2 days 3 months
Cookies, packaged 2 months 12-18 months
Crackers 2 months
Doughnuts, unfrosted 2-4 months
Muffins, baked 6-12 months
Pies, fruit 2-3 days (baked) 1-2 days (unbaked) 6-8 months (baked) 2-4 months (unbaked)
Pies, pumpkin or chiffon 2-3 days 1-2 months
Rolls and bread, unbaked 2-3 weeks 1 month
Waffles 1 month
Mixes/Packaged Foods
Biscuit, brownie, muffin mix 9 months
Cake mixes 6-9 months
Casserole mix 9-12 months
Cookies, homemade 2-3 weeks
Cookies, packaged 2 months
Crackers 3 months
Croutons and bread crumbs 6 months 6 months 1 year
Frosting, canned 3 months
Frosting, mix 8 months
Hot roll mix 18 months
Pancake mix 6-9 months
Piecrust, mix 6-9 months
Potatoes, instant 6-12 months
Rice mixes 6 months
Sauce and gravy mixes 6-12 months
Soup mixes 12 months
Toaster pastries 2-3 months
Other Foods
Baking powder 18 months
Baking soda 2 years
Chocolate syrup 2 years (unopened) 6 months (opened)
Cocoa mixes 8 months
Coffee, lighteners (dry) 9 months (unopened) 6 months (opened)
Cornstarch 18 months
Gelatin 18 months
Pectin 1 year
Salad dressings, bottled 12 months (unopened) 1-3 months (opened) Not recommended
Sugar, brown 18 months
Sugar, confectioners’ 18 months
Sugar, granulated 2 years
Vinegar 2 years (unopened) 1 year (opened)
Cheese, parmesan, grated 10 months (unopened) 2 months (opened)
Coconut, shredded 12 months (unopened) 6 months (opened)
Imitation bacon bits, etc. 4 months
Peas, beans, dried 12 months
Popcorn 2 years
Whipped topping, dry 12 months
Yeast, dry Expiration date on package
Honey, jams, syrups, molasses 1 year
Nuts, unshelled 6 months
Nuts, shelled 6 months
Peanut butter 6 months (unopened) 2 months (opened)
Chocolate 1 year
Coffee 1 year (unopened) 2-4 weeks (opened)
Coffee, instant 6 months (unopened) 2 months (opened)
Pudding mixes 1 year
Shortening, solid 8 months
Vegetable oils 1-3 months
Tea, bags or loose 1 year
Tea, instant 1 year
Soft drinks 3 months
Bouillon products 1 year
Mayonnaise 10-12 weeks Not recommended
Spices, Herbs, Condiments, Extracts
Catsup, chili sauce 12 months (unopened) 1 month (opened)
Mustard, prepared yellow (refrigerate 2 years (unopened) for longer storage) 6-8 months (opened)
Spices, whole 1-2 years
Spices, ground 6 months
Herbs 6 months
Herb/spice blends 2 years (unopened) 12 months (opened)
Other extracts 12 months

Exclusive Cupboard Storage Chart
• Store foods in cool cabinets and away from appliances which produce heat.
• Many staples and canned foods have a relatively long shelf life, but buy only what you can expect to use within the time recommended in the chart. Date food packages and use the oldest first. Foods stored for longer than recommended times or beyond date on the package may change quality, color and flavor.
• Buy fresh-looking packages. Dusty cans or torn labels can indicate old stock. Do not purchase dented or bulging cans.

Cupboard Storage Cupboard Storage2

Courtesy & Credits : UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA–LINCOLN &  North Dakota State University

Excerpts from original articles by


 

Know : Fruit Waxing and Safe-Consuming of Waxed Fruits

Fruit waxing is the process of covering fruits (and in some cases vegetables) with the artificial waxing material. Natural wax is removed first, usually by washing. Waxing materials may be either natural or petroleum-based.

The primary reasons for waxing are to prevent water loss (making up for the removal in washings of the natural waxes in fruits that have them, particularly citrus, but also, for example, apples) and thus retard shrinkage and spoilage, and to improve appearance. Dyes may be added to further enhance appearance, and sometimes fungicides. 

How to be Careful in consuming Artificially Waxed Apples?

Wax Coated ApplesIt is a fact that apple fruits are coated with wax, but the wax that is generally used is edible one and is safe to consume. However, some unscrupulous producers can coat apples with petroleum-based waxes that are harmful for human health.

Apples have natural wax coating on their surface, you can observe this when you pluck an apple from a tree and rub it with your hands. The whitish kind of powder that sticks to your palms is the natural wax on the surface of apple fruit. Likewise, when you scratch an artificially waxed apple, you will see a thin layer peeling off.

Apples are coated with wax for several reasons, like preservation, reduce loss of water, increase visual freshness and of course, replace the natural wax, because cleaning and processing of apples results in the loss of natural wax coat. This practice is very common, especially in supermarkets. Thin layer of wax is coated on apples, either by dipping, brushing or spraying with edible waxes like Carnauba or Shellac that are completely safe to consume and are not harmful. This edible wax is not digested, but is passed out through the digestive system.

On the other hand, some unscrupulous producers use the harmful petroleum-based waxes for coating of apples. If an apple looks very glossy and shiny, it is to be suspected. To avoid harmful wax coat, it is advisable to buy apples from markets and places where apples are grown. The chances that the farmers have not waxed apples will be good here. It is also a better idea to buy the dull apples that are fresh, without any kind of artificial coating.

More importantly, it is always a good practice to clean apples with lukewarm water thoroughly before eating. Also, you may use a paper towel with some vinegar (acetic acid) to wipe the apple before washing. Another obvious way to avoid harmful wax of apple fruits is to remove the entire peel, but you might lose on certain vitamins and also the crispiness of the peel. You can share and spread this health awareness about waxed apples. – (Courtesy: HoaxorFact.com)

Waxing Materials

The waxing materials used depend to some extent on regulations in the country of production and/or export; both natural waxes (sugar-cane, carnaubashellac, resinor) or petroleum-based waxes (usually proprietary formulae) are used. Wax may be applied in a volatile petroleum-based solvent but is now more commonly applied via a water-based emulsion. Blended paraffin waxes applied as an oil or paste are often used on vegetables. Brand names for waxes include Tal-Prolong, Semper-fresh, Frutox, Waxol, Fruit and vegetable kleen and Decco Luter

Know : Glazing Agent:

glazing agent is a natural or synthetic substance that provides a waxy, homogeneous, coating to prevent water loss and provide other surface protection for the substance.

Differences between natural and synthetic glazing agents : 

Natural

Natural glazing agents have been found present, most often in plants or insects. In nature, the agents are used to keep the moisture in the specimen, but science has harnessed this characteristic by turning it into a glazing agent that acts as a coating. This glazing agent is made up of a substance that is classified as a wax. A natural wax is chemically defined as an ester with a very long hydrocarbon chain that also includes a long chain alcohol. However, in a wax there have been many different chemical structures that can be included in a definition of a wax, such as: wax esters, sterol esters, ketones, aldehydes, alcohols, hydrocarbons, and sterols.

Examples are:

Synthetic

Science has produced similar glazing agents that mimic their natural counterparts. These components are added in different proportions to achieve the most optimal glazing agent for a product. These products range from things in the cosmetic, automobile and food industry.

  • Some of the characteristics that are looked for in all of the above industries are:

1. Preservation- It refers to the glazing agent to be able to protect the product from degrading and water loss. The characteristic can lead to a longer shelf life for a food or the longevity of a car without rusting.

2. Stability- It is important for the glazing agent itself to maintain its integrity if under any pressure or heat.

3. Uniform viscosity- This ensures for a stronger protective coating because it can be applied to the product as a homogeneous layer.

4. Industrial reproduction- This is important because most glazing agents are used on commercial goods and therefore large quantities of glazing agent may be needed.

There are different variations of glazing agents, depending on the product, but they are all designed for the same purpose.

Fruits were waxed to cause fermentation as early as the 12th or the 13th century; commercial producers began waxing citrus to extend shelf life in the 1920s and 1930s. Aesthetics—consumer preference for shiny fruit—has since become the main reason. 

In addition to fruit, some vegetables can usefully be waxed, such as cassava; vegetables commonly waxed include cucumbers, swedes or rutabagas and green tomatoes. A distinction may be made between storage wax, pack-out wax (for immediate sale) and high-shine wax (for optimum attractiveness)


Courtesy : Wikipedia and HoaxorFact

Know : Food Additives, How they are numbered and Few scariest additives!

food additives

Various Food Additives

Acids – Food acids are added to make flavors “sharper”, and also act as preservatives and antioxidants. Common food acids include vinegarcitric acidtartaric acidmalic acidfumaric acid, and lactic acid.

Acidity regulators – Acidity regulators are used to change or otherwise control the acidity and alkalinity of foods.

Anticaking agents – Anticaking agents keep powders such as milk powder from caking or sticking.

Antifoaming agents – Antifoaming agents reduce or prevent foaming in foods.

Antioxidants – Antioxidants such as vitamin C act as preservatives by inhibiting the effects of oxygen on food, and can be beneficial to health.

Bulking agents – Bulking agents such as starch are additives that increase the bulk of a food without affecting its nutritional value.

Food coloring – Colorings are added to food to replace colors lost during preparation, or to make food look more attractive.

Color retention agents – In contrast to colorings, color retention agents are used to preserve a food’s existing color.

Emulsifiers – Emulsifiers allow water and oils to remain mixed together in an emulsion, as in mayonnaiseice cream, and homogenized milk.

Flavors – Flavors are additives that give food a particular taste or smell, and may be derived from natural ingredients or created artificially.

Flavor enhancers – Flavor enhancers enhance a food’s existing flavors. They may be extracted from natural sources (through distillationsolvent extractionmaceration, among other methods) or created artificially.

Flour treatment agents – Flour treatment agents are added to flour to improve its color or its use in baking.

Glazing agents – Glazing agents provide a shiny appearance or protective coating to foods.

Humectants – Humectants prevent foods from drying out.

Tracer gas – Tracer gas allow for package integrity testing to prevent foods from being exposed to atmosphere, thus guaranteeing shelf life.

Preservatives  – Preservatives prevent or inhibit spoilage of food due to fungibacteria and other microorganisms.

Stabilizers – Stabilizers, thickeners and gelling agents, like agar or pectin (used in jam for example) give foods a firmer texture. While they are not true emulsifiers, they help to stabilize emulsions.

Sweeteners – Sweeteners are added to foods for flavoring. Sweeteners other than sugar are added to keep the food energy (calories) low, or because they have beneficial effects for diabetes mellitus and tooth decay and diarrhea.

Thickeners – Thickeners are substances which, when added to the mixture, increase its viscosity without substantially modifying its other properties.

Caffeine and other GRAS (generally recognized as safe) additives such as sugar and salt are not required to go through the regulation process.

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How they are numbered?

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E numbers are codes for chemicals which can be used as food additives (Applicable to Europion Union and Switzerland only). Every country may can different Numbers / Codes for Food Additives similar to these. However these are the common code for food additives. (click on the full list to see the detailed chemical names of the additives)

E number range Subranges Description
100–199 (full list)Colours 100–109 yellows
110–119 oranges
120–129 reds
130–139 blues & violets
140–149 greens
150–159 browns & blacks
160–199 gold and others
200–299 (full list)Preservatives 200–209 sorbates
210–219 benzoates
220–229 sulphites
230–239 phenols & formates (methanoates)
240–259 nitrates
260–269 acetates (ethanoates)
270–279 lactates
280–289 propionates (propanoates)
290–299 others
300–399 (full list)Antioxidants & acidity regulators 300–305 ascorbates (vitamin C)
306–309 Tocopherol (vitamin E)
310–319 gallates & erythorbates
320–329 lactates
330–339 citrates & tartrates
340–349 phosphates
350–359 malates & adipates
360–369 succinates & fumarates
370–399 others
400–499 (full list)Thickenersstabilisers & emulsifiers 400–409 alginates
410–419 natural gums
420–429 other natural agents
430–439 polyoxyethene compounds
440–449 natural emulsifiers
450–459 phosphates
460–469 cellulose compounds
470–489 fatty acids & compounds
490–499 others
500–599 (full list)pH regulators & anti-caking agents 500–509 mineral acids & bases
510–519 chlorides & sulphates
520–529 sulphates & hydroxides
530–549 alkali metal compounds
550–559 silicates
570–579 stearates & gluconates
580–599 others
600–699 (full list)Flavour enhancers 620–629 glutamates & guanylates
630–639 inosinates
640–649 others
700–799 (full list)Antibiotics 700–713  
900–999 (full list)Miscellaneous 900–909 waxes
910–919 synthetic glazes
920–929 improving agents
930–949 packaging gases
950–969 sweeteners
990–999 foaming agents
1100–1599 (full list)Additional chemicals 1100–1599 New chemicals that do not fall into standard classification schemes

NB: Not all examples of a class fall into the given numeric range. Moreover, many chemicals, particularly in the E400–499 range, have a variety of purposes.


SOME SCARIEST FOOD ADDITIVES

15. Scary Ingredient #1: Olestra:

 A fat substitute synthesized by Procter & Gamble. Because human digestive enzymes can’t break down the big molecules, Olestra contributes 0 calories to your diet.

Why it’s scary: In the late ’90s, Frito-Lay released Olestra-enhanced WOW chips and Procter & Gamble introduced Fat Free Pringles. Both products were required to carry warning labels to notify customers about the risk of “loose stools.” Within 4 years, some 15,000 people had dialed into a hotline set up specifically to handle adverse-reaction complaints. Apparently the complaints didn’t move the FDA, because in 2003, the administration revoked the warning-label mandate. If you want to take your chances with diarrhea, go ahead, but first consider this: Olestra also appears to interfere with the body’s ability to absorb some crucial nutrients like beta-carotene and lycopene. To counteract the effect, processes add some nutrients back, but it’s unlikely that all the blocked nutrients are adequately replaced.

Where you’ll find it: Lay’s Light chips, Pringles Light chips

14. Scary Ingredient #2: Caramel Coloring:

An artificial pigment created by heating sugars. Frequently, this process includes ammonia.

Why it’s scary: Caramel coloring shows up in everything from soft drinks and sauces to breads and pastries. When made from straight sugar, it’s relatively benign. But when produced with ammonia it puts off 2-methylimidazole and 4-methylimidazole, chemicals that have been linked to cancer in mice. The risk is strong enough that the California government, a bellwether for better food regulation, categorized 4-methylimidazole as “known to cause cancer” earlier this year. Unfortunately, companies aren’t required to disclose whether their coloring is made with ammonia, so you’d be wise to avoid it as much as you can.

Where you’ll find it: Colas and other soft drinks, La Choy soy sauce, Stove Top stuffing mix

13. Scary Ingredient #3: Saccharin:

 An artificial sweetener discovered by accident in the 1870s.

 Why it’s scary: Studies have linked saccharin to bladder tumors in rats, and in 1977, the FDA required warning labels on all saccharin-containing foods. In 2000, the agency changed its stance and allowed saccharin to be sold without warning labels. But that doesn’t make it entirely safe. A 2008 Purdue study found that replacing sugar with saccharin in rats’ diets made them gain more weight, proving once again that you should be aware of these faux fat foes.

 Where you’ll find it: Sweet ‘N Low, TaB cola

12. Scary Ingredient #4: Potassium Bromate:

 A compound that conditions flour and helps bread puff up during baking.

 Why it’s scary: Potassium bromate causes thyroid and kidney tumors in rats, and it’s banned from food use in many countries. In California, products containing potassium bromate are required to carry a cancer warning. Fortunately, negative publicity has made the additive relatively rare, but until the FDA banishes it, you should remain on the lookout.

 Where you’ll find it: Johnny Rockets Hoagie Roll

11. Scary Ingredient #5: Butylated Hydroxyanisole (BHA) and Butylated Hydroxytoluene (BHT):

Petroleum-derived antioxidants and preservatives.

Why they’re scary: The Department of Health and Human Services says BHA is “reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen,” yet the FDA allows it to be used anyway. BHT is considered less dangerous, but in animal research, it too has resulted in cancer. Oddly, the chemicals aren’t even always necessary; in most cases they can be replaced with vitamin E.

Where you’ll find it: Goya lard, Golden Grahams, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, Orbit gum

10. Scary Ingredient #6: Partially Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil :

 A semi-solid fat created when food processors force hydrogen into unsaturated fatty acids.

 Why it’s scary: Partially hydrogenated fats are the principle sources of trans fat in the American diet, and a Harvard study estimated that trans fat causes 70,000 heart attacks every year. The good news: Partially hydrogenated oils are beginning to slowly retreat from our food. Progressive jurisdictions like New York City are starting to restrict the allowable amounts in restaurants, and many chains are switching to healthier frying oil. Still, the battle isn’t over. At Long John Silver’s, for example, there are still 17 menu items with more than 2 grams of the stuff. According to the American Heart Association, that’s about the maximum you should consume in a single day.

 Where you’ll find it: McDonald’s McChicken, Long John Silver’s Broccoli Cheese Soup

9. Scary Ingredient #7: Sulfites:

 Preservatives that maintain the color of food, and by releasing sulfur dioxide, prevent bacterial growth.

 Why it’s scary: Humans have used sulfites to keep food fresh for thousands of years, but some people—especially asthma sufferers—experience breathing difficulties when exposed. In the 1980s, unregulated use resulted in at least a dozen deaths, prompting the FDA to slap warning labels on wine bottles and develop new guidelines for proper use. Now restaurants can no longer soak fresh ingredients in sulfites. According to the Center for Science in the Public Interest, there have been no known deaths since the new legislation took hold. The bottom line: If you’re among the majority of people not sensitive to sulfites, consumption won’t hurt you. If you’re not sure, ask your doctor for a test.

 Where you’ll find it: Wine, Sun-Maid Mixed Fruit, Jolly Ranchers, Fig Newtons

 

8. Scary Ingredient #8: Azodicarbonamide:

 A synthetic yellow-orange dough conditioner.

 Why it’s scary: This chemical is used most frequently in the production of industrial foam plastic, and although the FDA has approved its use for food in the States, the United Kingdom has labeled it a potential cause of asthma. In a review of 47 studies on azodicarbonamide, the World Health Organization concluded that it probably does trigger asthmatic symptoms. The WHO concluded, “exposure levels should be reduced as much as possible.” I’ll put it more concisely: Avoid it.

 Where you’ll find it: Dunkin’ Donuts bagels, McDonald’s burger buns

7. Scary Ingredient #9: Carrageenan:

 A thickener and emulsifier extracted from seaweed.

Why it’s scary: Seaweed is actually good for you, but carrageenan is a mere seaweed byproduct. Through animal studies, it has been linked to cancer, colon trouble, and ulcers. It isn’t certain that carrageenan harms humans, but avoiding it is clearly the safer option. Most studies examined degraded forms of the additive, and research from the University of Iowa found that carrageenan could be degraded through the normal digestive process.

Where you’ll find it: Weight Watchers Giant Chocolate Fudge Ice Cream Bars, Skinny Cow Ice Cream Sandwiches, Creamsicles

6. Scary Ingredient #10: Ammonium Sulfate:

An inorganic salt that occurs naturally near active volcanoes and is used commercially to nourish yeast and help bread rise.

Why it’s scary: This nitrogen-rich compound is most often used as fertilizer, and also appears commonly in flame retardants. Thankfully, the ingredient only sounds scary—a 2006 Japanese rat study found the additive to be non-carcinogenic. Both the Center for Science in the Public Interest and the FDA deem it safe.

Where you’ll find it: Nature’s Own bread, Subway rolls

 

5. Scary Ingredient #11: Aspartame:

A zero-calorie artificial sweetener made by combing two amino acids with methanol. Most commonly used in diet soda, aspartame is 180 times sweeter than sugar.

Why it’s scary: Over the past 30 years, the FDA has received thousands of consumer complaints due mostly to neurological symptoms such as headaches dizziness, memory loss, and, in rare cases, epileptic seizures. Many studies have shown the sweetener to be completely harmless, while other have linked the additive to cancer. A 2006 Italian study found that rats fed high daily doses of aspartame—the equivalent of nearly 3 liters for a 150-pound human—experienced higher levels of lymphomas, leukemia, and other types of cancer. Still, after reviewing the study, the FDA concluded that the results weren’t strong enough to warrant the confectionary chemical’s removal from the market.

Where you’ll find it: Nutra-Sweet, Equal, Diet Coke, Diet Pepsi

4. Scary Ingredient #12: Monosodium Glutamate (MSG):

The salt of the amino acid glutamic acid, used to enhance the savory quality of foods. MSG alone has little flavor, and exactly how it enhances other foods is unknown.

Why it’s scary: After forty years of scrutiny, research has yet to reach a definitive verdict on MSG. Studies have shown that injecting the amino acid into mice causes brain-cell damage, but the FDA believes these results are not typical for humans. Still, the administration fields complaints every year for nausea, headaches, chest pains, and weakness. It could be that the results are limited to people with acute MSG sensitivity, so the FDA continues to allow manufacturers to use it.

Where you’ll find it: Hormel Chili, Hamburger Helper, Stove Top Cornbread Stuffing

 

3. Scary Ingredient #13: Nitrates and nitrites:

 Nitrogen-based compounds that are essential for digestion in small amounts. They occur naturally but are synthetically produced for use in fertilizer and as food additives. They’re commonly used to cure processed meats.

Why they’re scary: Nitrates and nitrites have a tendency to fuse with amino acids to become carcinogenic nitrosamines. Ironically, the processed meats into which nitrates are commonly added are rich with amino acids, making nitrosamine formation very likely. In addition to concerns about cancer, increased nitrate and nitrite intake has been linked to deaths in Alzheimer’s, type 2 diabetes, and Parkinson’s patients. Despite the risks, the valuable use of nitrates and nitrites as inhibitors of botulism warrant their acceptance as food additives in the eyes of the FDA.

Where you’ll find it: Oscar Meyer hot dogs, Hormel bacon, Hillshire Farm deli meat

 

2. Scary Ingredient #14: Blue #2:

An artificial dye used to color food. It can be used alone or mixed with other dyes, and the goal is typically to suggest the appearance of natural food.

Why it’s scary: A study published by the Center for Science in the Public Interest showed that the ingestion of Blue #2 led to increases in tumor development in the brain and mammary glands in lab rats. The FDA dismissed these findings, citing a variety of nebulous weaknesses in the study’s methods. The bottom line: whether or not artificial dyes are harmful, the foods they appear in are the most heavily processed, nutritionally bankrupt foods in the supermarket.

Where you’ll find it: Fruit Loops, Skittles, Betty Crocker Rainbow Chip frosting

 

1. Scary Ingredient #15: Paraben:

Parabens are used to prevent mold and yeast formation in food, and they’re also used in cosmetics, toothpaste, and personal lubricant. Although they exist in nature, the parabens used in commercial products are created synthetically.

Why it’s scary: It’s been documented that parabens act as mild estrogens, and according to the Environmental Working Group, they can disrupt the natural balance of hormones in your body. In a Japanese study, male rats fed propyl paraben daily for four weeks suffered lower sperm and testosterone production, and other studies have found parabens present in breast cancer tissues.

Where you’ll find it: Baskin Robbins sundaes

Courtesy and Source : Wikipedia & Eatthis.com

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