Know : Max Retail Price (MRP) Violations & Complaints : Numbers

YOU CAN COMPLAINT IF YOU NEED TO PAY MORE THAN MRP, Here are Contact Numbers…

MRPAll packaged goods in India, ranging from beverages to mobile phones to cosmetics, are stamped with a price dictated by the manufacturer as being the maximum allowable cost to the consumer.
Today’s version of MRP was adapted in December 1990. Previous to this date, manufacturer’s had the option of printing the price of their commodities in two ways:

  • ->Retail price Rs, local taxes extra
  • ->Maximum retail price Rs, inclusive of all taxes

Allegations from consumers and organizations that merchants were over-charging by adding additional local taxes on products brought about the change to MRP in 1990. Merchants were tacking on charges under the guise of local taxes when the actual rates were much lower. Consumers could pay one price for a product and a much higher or lower price in a neighboring town. Thus the change was made by the Ministry of Civil Supplies and its executive wing, the Department of Legal Metrology to the Standards of Weights & Measures Act (Packaged Commodities’ Rules). The change was meant to end complaints and confusion of over-charging to consumers for products. There have since been numerous complaints regarding this system of pricing with regards to under-charging of goods relative to MRP.

What does this mean for you?
In theory you should check the MRP on products before purchasing. Some merchants will charge less than the printed price at their discretion. If this happens to me, I make a mental note to return to that store in the future. On the opposite side, some merchants will try to charge more. If questioned, you may get a response that a newer stock has since come into their store with a revised MRP under which they are selling the old stock. While this is not allowable, there isn’t much you can do unless the merchant feels you aren’t willing to ease on the lower price. Another tactic to watch for is a merchant quoting you a price which he/she will then offer a discount on. Being giddy about the prospect of receiving a discount, you may not check the MRP until you’ve reached your destination. Unwrap your item to discover the MRP is actually less than the discounted price you paid.

What can you do to protect yourself?

  • Obtain full information regarding quality and price before making any purchases.
  • Be careful, about false and /or misleading advertisement.
  • Purchase only when you need and do not purchase in a hurry.
  • Do not buy blindly. Demand full information before you buy.
  • Do not compromise on the quality of goods and services and its quality. Purchase only quality products.
  • Ask for Bills always, bills that have enough proof that you can legally claim that you have made the purchase from that particular retailer.

You can file a complaint with the District Forum if you feel you have been over-charged. However, the opposing party has 30 days to file their version of events and can even extend this for an additional 15 day period. As a tourist you have very little recourse legally unless you are a long term traveler in one location.

Do keep one thing in mind. As of 2003, hotels are not subject to the MRP act. Packed goods purchased within a hotel can be sold at the property’s discretion.
Keep your eyes open and always check prices cause your travel budget only goes so far.

For Complaining in India…

S.No. Contact Details of the Concerned Department
1. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Andhra Pradesh,

No. 209, PWD Building,

Gandhi Nagar, Hyderabad,

Andhra Pradesh – 500 380

Ph: 040-27612170

Fax: 040-27613667

HYDERABAD – 500 030

2. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Andaman & Nicobar Island,

Port Blair – 744 101

Ph: 03192-232321

PORT BLAIR – 744 101

3. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Arunachal Pradesh,

Old Secretaraiat  Complex,

Nagarlagun –791110

Ph: 0360-2350837, 2248620, 2351150

Fax:0360-2350837

4. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Assam,

Ulubari,

Guwahati-781007

Ph: 0361-2470992

5. Office of Dept., of Agriculture

Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Bihar, Raja Bajar,

Beli Road,

Patna – 800 014

Ph: 0612-2286258

Fax 0612 -2224365:

6. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Chandigarh Administration,

Old Architect Building, West Wing,

Sector 19-B,

Chandigarh

Ph: 0172-2741341

Fax: 0172-741341,2741503

7. The Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Govt of Chattisgarh,

Raipur-492001 

Ph.0771-2524294/2343274/2343275

8. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Dadra &  Nagar Haveli Administration,

Silvasa – 396 230

Ph: 02639-242721

9. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Daman & Diu Administration,

Daman – 396 220

Ph: 02638-254685

10. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of India Delhi, NCT of Delhi,

117-118, C-Block, Vikas Bhavan,

N.Delhi – 110 002

Ph: 011-23379266, 23379262

Fax: 011- 23379267:

11. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Goa,

Panaji – 403 001

Ph: 0832-2426432

Fax:0832-2220218

12. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Gujarat,

Tolmap Bhavan, Opp. Sarang Pur Water Tank,

Ahmedabad, Gujarat – 380 002

Ph: 079-22114177

Fax: 079-22114234

AHMEDABAD – 380 002 

13. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Haryana,

Footwall chowk, Dist., industries center building ,

Ambala Cantt.

Ph: 0172-708581, 701366

14. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Himachal Pradesh,

Apurti Bhavan, 1st Floor,

Block No. 42, SDA Commercial Complex,

Kasumpti Shimla – 171 009

Ph: 0177-2625345

15 Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Jammu & Kashmir,

Revenue Complex Building,

Takkipora, Srinagar

Ph: 0194-473828

16. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Jammu & Kashmir,

Civil Sectt.

Block-I/16, Jammu

Ph: 0191-2549682

Fax:0191-2566188,2458693

17. Joint Agriculture Director cum

Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Govt of Jharkhand ,Lakshmi Nivas,

Krishi Bahvan, Kanke Road, Ranchi – 834006

0651 230923 (fax)

18. Sri Ramachandra

Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Karnataka,

No.1, Ali Askar Road,

P.B. No. 175, Bangalore, Karnataka – 560 052

Ph: 080-22253500  26682715 (Res)

Fax 080-22259024

BANGALORE-560052

19. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Kerala,

Vikas Bhavan,

Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala – 695 033

Ph: 0471-2303821    2310321  (Res)

Fax:0471-2305996

20. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Lakshdweep,

Kavaratti – 682 555

Ph: 04896-262112

Fax:04896- 263298

KAVARATTI – 682 555

21. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Madhya Pradesh,

Near Dak Bhavan,

Bhopal-Hoshangabad Road,

Bhopal – 462 011

Ph: 0755-2551017;

. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Maharashtra,

Government Barrack No. 7,

Free Press Journal Marg,

Mumbai – 400 021

Ph: 022-22023354

Fax: 022-22024950

23 Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Manipur,

2nd MR Gate, North ADC Lane,

Imphal – 795 001

Ph: 0385-311687,

24. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Meghalaya,

Shillong Temple Road,

Lower Lachuier,

Shillong – 793 001

Ph: 0364-222576

25. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Mizoram,

Aizawal

Ph: 0389-2322872, 2322572

Fax:0389-2321035

26. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Nagaland,

Kohima – 797 001

Ph: 0370-2221609

0370-2222862;    2221764(Res)

27. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Orissa,

Khandagiri,

Bhubneshwar – 751 003

Ph: 0674-4129967

Fax:0674-2402854

28. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Dy. Commissioner (Excise) and Ex-officio Under Secy.(Revenue)

Thattanchavady,

Pondicherry – 605 009

Ph: 0413-252493 (personal), 253462 (Off: with extension), 372523®

255196 (Res) Fax: 0413-253462

29. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Punjab,

17, Bays Building, Sector 17,

Chandigarh

0172-2701131

30. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Rajasthan,

Udyog Bhavan, Tilak Marg,

Jaipur – 300 001

Ph: 0141-380796, 380727

Telefax:380796

31

.

Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Sikkim,

Paljor Stadium, Paljor Stadium Road,

Gangatok – 737 101

Ph: 03592-202893;

32. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Tamil Nadu,

DMS Compound,

Teynampet, Chennai – 600 006

Ph: 044-24321 438

33 Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Tripura,

Tripura, Agartala

Ph: 0381-2325997;

34. The Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Govt of Uttaranchal, 15, Gandhi Road,

Dehradun –248001.

35. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of Uttar Pradesh,

7, Walaquad Road, Lucknow – 1 (Uttar Pradesh)

Ph: 0522-2628063;

36. Controller of Legal Metrology (Weights & Measures)

Government of West Bengal,

45, Ganesh Chandra Avenue,

Calcutta – 700 013

Ph: 033-22364258,22256647,22520052

Courtesy : http://consumeraffairs.nic.inhttp://www.fullstopindia.com

Bamboo Art from Bengal, India

Awesome, Thanks for sharing and spreading the word about such arts which definitely needs something to boost up.

Life is a Vacation

It was a festive evening in Kolkata and while I watched well dressed men, women and children turned out in their finest with a spring in their step my eyes did not miss the stall selling art pieces across the road. I stopped by at the stall chatting with the artist who gladly showed me all his pieces and described his art while attending to his customers who were attracted by the jewelry on display. Bamboo Art is popular in Kerala, Bengal and other eastern or north eastern states of India but the pictures and details in this post is from Bengal.

All the stuff that I photographed is hand made as in carved out of bamboo manually. After that it is sanded to make it smooth and then burnt to get the colour as well as to harden the piece. Finally, it is varnished for that rich brownish glossy…

View original post 204 more words

Eco Preservation : Sanitation for India

water

848 million Indians do not have access to clean drinking water and toilets. States like Orissa and West Bengal have the highest number of people without access to sanitation facilities. India’s poor sanitary predicament costs the country 54 billion dollars annually. 

The consumption of unsafe water coupled with unsanitary living conditions, leads to contraction of water borne diseases such as typhoid, diarrhea, SARS and Hepatitis A. Diarrhea alone kills 1600 Indians every day.

In order to understand the intertwining of water, sanitation and hygiene, and therefore the biggest problem these pose to India, one must understand the lopsided development in the nation. Not all parts of India have clean sewage facilities. In fact, nearly 80 percent of sewage from Indian cities flows into clean water systems. To add to this problem, nearly 300 million of India’s 1.2 billion people, defecate openly, leading to extreme contamination of water and improper (to say the least) disposal of feces. It is the amalgamation of these problems and little to no awareness on the treatment of unsafe water (such as boiling it), which leads to the contraction of several diseases and an increase in malnutrition amongst children.

– Excerpts from chaiwithlakshmi.in Read more 

You can help them overcome this. Click here to read the complete story here 

Alert! : Child Trafficking

Child Traficking

Human trafficking is the third largest profitable industry in the world. Child trafficking unlike many other issues is found in both developed and developing nations. Trafficked children are used for prostitution, forced into marriage, illegally adopted, used as cheap or unpaid labor, used for sport and organ harvesting. Some children are recruited into armed groups. Trafficking exposes children to violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation. According to UNICEF a child victim of trafficking is “any person under 18 who is recruited, transported, transferred, harbored or received for the purpose of exploitation, either within or outside a country”. Trafficking is one of the hardest crimes to track and investigate hence data is hard to obtain. The latest figures estimate that 1.2 million children are trafficked worldwide every year. Child prostitution has the highest supply of trafficked children.

India is a source, destination, and transit country for trafficking for many purposes such as commercial sexual exploitation. The majority of the trafficking is within the country but there are also a large number trafficked from Nepal and Bangladesh. Children are trafficked to Middle Eastern countries for sport such as camel racing. There are no national or regional estimates for the number of children trafficked every year. But 40% of prostitutes are children, and there is a growing demand for young girls in the industry. 

NGOs estimate that 12,000 – 50,000 women and children are trafficked into the country annually from neighboring states in the sex trade. Thousands of girls are trafficked from Bangladesh and Nepal. 200,000 Nepalese girls under 16 years are in prostitution in India. An estimated 1,000 to 1,500 Indian children are smuggled out of the country every year to Saudi Arabia for begging during the Hajj. Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, West Bengal and Tamil Nadu have the largest number of people trafficked. Intra state/inter district trafficking is high in Rajasthan, Assam, Meghalaya, Bihar, Uttar Pradesh, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Maharashtra. Delhi and Goa are the major receiver states. Trafficking from northeastern states is high but often overlooked. In 2008, 529 girls were trafficked from Assam alone. 

There is a rising demand for live-in maids in urban areas. This has resulted in the trafficking of girls from villages in West Bengal, Jharkhand and Chhattisgarh to live under extremely poor conditions first in “placement agencies” and later in the employers’ homes. Placement agents keep the girls in small unhygienic rooms packed together. They are often made to do the placement agent’s household work and subjected to sexual abuse. Smita a sixteen year old girl was taken from her village in Jharkhand and subjected to various forms of sexual abuse and exploitation at the hand of her employers including rape. When rescued her parents refused to take her back since she had been tainted by rape. Falling sex ratios in Haryana and Punjab has led to a need for trafficking of brides from villages in Orissa, Jharkhand, Bihar, Assam and West Bengal, who have been sold off by the parents. Jyoti, age fourteen, was sold and married to a 40-year old man of Rs 15,000 in order to produce a male heir.

Alert! : Its Shampoo we drink, not Milk! Shocking Reports!

ADULTERATED_MILK

Just see this video below, though it is in Hindi, you can clearly understand what those guys were doing. They make the crap MILK out of detergents / Shampoo and Oil and sell it to the public. Even Infants trust and drink this S**t assuming to be milk.  Read articles about it following the Video. 

Here we share three Shocking news articles about Adulterated Milk? Well that’s not even Milk. 

Hello parents! I am going to take an apple and dry it. Then I mash it into ‘apple’ powder. After a few months I add water and chemicals to it, shape it and sell it to you as a fresh pure apple. Will you buy it for your children to eat?

No? Why not? You do it everyday with milk.

The government brings out yearly statistics on fake milk, and even when their own studies done by the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) show that more than 75% is not milk at all but urea, water, caustic soda, paint, sugar, detergent Hydrogen Peroxide, starch, glucose, salt, Skimmed Milk Powder (SMP) and vegetable fat, they still will take no action on the producers.

Let us presume that you buy government milk packets thinking that the government could not be cheating its own people. But when the government allows corruption in every field, why not milk? Today a major part of the milk in the packets is not the primary product of a cow or buffalo but reconstituted from powder.

Here is a report done by Harish Damodaran, an award winning journalist who has specialized in agri-business and commodities coverage: ‘ Nowhere is this more apparent than in the national Capital itself, where the market leader, Mother Dairy India Ltd, consumes an estimated 20,000 tonnes of skimmed milk powder (SMP) annually or 55 tonnes daily. That translates into six lakh litres per day (LLPD) of milk or roughly 30 per cent of the 20-22 LLPD that Mother Dairy sells on an average in Delhi. The proportion of reconstituted milk to the total throughout rises to 50 % during summer months.’

According to the milk producers, real milk is put aside in the winter months and turned into powder which is then mixed back into the milk whenever real milk runs short – which seems to be everyday.

The Gujarat Cooperative Milk Marketing Federation (GCMMF) and owner of Mother Dairy says that it supplies ‘pure’ milk in the whole of Gujarat, Mumbai, Delhi and Madhya Pradesh (this is disproved for Delhi by the quantity of milk powder being bought). But in areas like West Bengal where all the cows have been killed or sent to Bangladesh (as in Kerala or the Northeast), there is no fresh milk available. There is a limit to the milk that can be sent by rail from Gujarat to Kolkata (and this milk will have chemicals like urea added to it so that it does not curdle on the way) so a large proportion of the so called pure milk has to be reconstituted milk.

Even in the states where there is milk, milk powder is added by private cooperatives and dairies. Why is this done? The Prevention of Food Adulteration rules stipulate a minimum 8.5 % Solids-Not-Fat (SNF) content for toned milk and 9 per cent in double-toned milk. If a dairy adds water then, to bring up the milk to the regulation standard, skimmed milk powder is added.

According to the government, Delhi, Uttar Pradesh, Punjab, Rajasthan and Haryana have crores of milk producing cattle and are the top milk producers of the country. So why is most of the milk here either completely fake or made of milk powder? Could it be that the government is simply faking cattle figures? There is no real milk, because there are no cows or buffaloes. They have all disappeared into illegal meat and leather slaughterhouses.

Why is milk not being labelled as ‘reconstituted’. Why is it still allowed to be called pure? In every other country including China, all dairy companies that are marketing reconstituted milk have to put this on their label. If this were done in India, there would be a sharp fall in the sale, and milk consumers would then demand fresh milk themselves. This would impact the illegal meat export that the government encourages. Therefore. the Ministry for Consumer Affairs will not do so.

Just to remind you: The National Survey on Milk Adulteration 2011 was conducted to check contaminants in milk throughout India. Most states failed the tests. Five states were found to be 100 % non-conforming to the milk standards set by the FSSAI. 14 % of the samples had detergent in them – in Jharkhand, Bihar, West Bengal and Odisha. 70% of Delhi milk samples failed the FSSAI standards.

46% milk was found diluted with water. Of 1791 samples, skimmed milk powder was present in nearly 548 samples and 477 samples contained glucose.

The report appeared on January 10th 2013. The FSSAI were summoned and told to repair the damage they had done by releasing these shocking truths. So they are now busy issuing ‘clarifications.’

First they issued a press release stating that ‘non conforming’ did not mean that it was ‘unsafe for consumption’. The milk may be of ‘sub standard’ quality but ‘not necessarily’ unsafe. In short: The milk may be rubbish but not everyone dies from drinking it so it can continue to be sold. The FSSAI officials have clarified that adding water to milk is only bad if ‘the water which has possibly been added is contaminated.’ So, it is not bad to cheat the customer by adding water to an expensive product which is sold by weight – it is OK if the adulterant is clean.

Regarding reconstituted milk made from skimmed milk powder, instead of banning the practice, the FSSAI has said that a circular will be issued to big dairy houses to brand the milk right. The circular has not been issued till today.

Regarding the presence of formalin or formaldehyde, (a chemical used for preserving dead bodies and to increase the shelf life of milk when it is being transported), it is illegal in food and is a carcinogen. The FSSAI says ‘That is allowed for preservation. Maybe where we detected it they must have put it in larger quantities.’

Regarding the detergents found in milk, the FSSAI says that this is because the handlers of milk have not washed out the detergents, used to clean hands and vessels. before handling the milk! It is a known fact that detergent is used to make synthetic milk to increase the thickness and viscosity of the milk. A study done by the Indian Council of Medical Research states that detergents in milk cause food poisoning and gastrointestinal complications.

Now the FSSAI says it can’t do anything about making milk pure- it has to be done by the states. The states refuse to take any action saying that they have not seen the report (which was published on the front page of every paper across India). Bihar’s milk was found to be 100% contaminated but the state Food Safety Authority maintains that ‘We have no idea where they collected the samples from. Once the report is shared with us, we will collect the samples, test it in our labs and then take appropriate action on whether the license has to be revoked or not.’ This is six months after the report. (In any case the department has only 23 officers to man the food quality of the entire state.)

The Delhi Food Safety Authority has the same reaction. They agree that ‘The samples were found to contain skimmed milk powder. But this is not hazardous to health, its just reconstituted milk.’ Delhi has an estimated daily demand of 70 lakh liters of milk, about 90% is supplied by brands. Neutralisers like Sodium Hydroxide, Potassium Hydroxide, Ammonia, Carbon Trioxide (carbonate) and other alkalis are used to correct and optimise the pH value of un-fresh milk so that they appear to be fresh milk. Obviously they would be a necessary component in reconstituted milk, which is what 50% of Delhi’s milk is in summer.

The FSSAI refuses to send their report officially to any state or even to the Indian Dairy Association! So the states have an excuse to ignore it. Even if they got them, most of the state testing laboratories are either defunct or ill equipped.

This belief that we are the world’s number one milk producer is misplaced. We are the number one fake milk producer in the world. And the only way you can stop this and protect your children is by totally stopping the purchase of this dangerous product.

–  by Menaka Gandhi – www.mathrubhumi.com

IN_MLKSAFE0212_CC

Another Article from Reuters

Indians may think twice before gulping down a glass of milk after the country’s food safety regulator found most samples collected in a survey were either diluted or adulterated with products including fertilizer, bleach and detergent.

The study, conducted this month by the food safety and standards authority of India, found milk was adulterated with skimmed milk powder and glucose, or more shockingly hydrogen peroxide, urea and detergent.

Hydrogen peroxide is used in bleach, while urea is commonly used in fertilizer.

“Consumption of milk with detergent may cause health hazards and indicates lack of hygiene and sanitation in the milk handling,” the regulator said in a report.

“Addition of water not only reduces the nutritional value of milk but contaminated water may also pose health risks.”

A health ministry official declined to comment on the report.

India has long struggled with adulteration of food and milk by unscrupulous traders. Almost 70 percent of the 1,791 samples taken nationwide were contaminated or watered down, according to the report.

Out of 33 Indian states, non-fat adulterants were found in all the milk samples from West Bengal, Orissa and Jharkhand. This adds to concern about West Bengal’s faltering health and safety standards. In December, an adulterated batch of bootleg liquor killed at least 125 drinkers in the eastern state.

The deaths came a few days after a hospital fire killed 93 people in the state’s capital Kolkata.

New Delhi fared worse than most states, with as many as 70 percent of the samples tainted. The western state of Goa and eastern state of Puducherry conformed to the standards, with no indication of adulteration in their milk.

– By Annie Banerji

Milk_0_0

Yet another one from NDTV

Over 68 per cent of milk in the country does not conform to the standards set by the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI), the Centre has told the Supreme Court on a plea for checking sale of synthetic and adulterated milk and various dairy products.

The submission has been made by the Centre in its affidavit which referred to a survey conducted by the FSSAI, which had found that over 68 per cent of the “non-conforming” milk was found in urban areas, 66 per cent of which was loose milk.

According to the FSSAI’s 2011 survey, the most common adulterant was found to be the addition of water, and the main reason for deviation from the standards was addition of glucose and skimmed milk powder. It also found that in some samples, detergent was mixed.

 The affidavit was filed in response to the notice issued on a Public Interest Litigation (PIL) by a group of citizens, led by Swami Achyutanand Tirth of Uttarakhand, seeking a check on sale of synthetic and adulterated milk and various dairy products.

Notices had also been issued to Haryana, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand and Delhi governments on a PIL alleging that synthetic and adulterated milk and milk products are prepared using urea, detergent, refined oil, caustic soda and white paint which, according to studies, are “very hazardous” to human life and can cause serious diseases like cancer.

The petitioners’ advocate Anurag Tomar said that the affidavit is silent on many aspects which allegedly refer to adulteration of milk and its products.

The affidavit said that over 83 per cent of the non-conforming milk in rural areas was found to be loose milk.
The FSSAI had analysed 1791 samples of milk randomly collected from 33 states and Union territories to identify the common adulterant in milk, both loose and packaged.

It had gathered samples from rural and urban areas and after analysing them at five different public sector laboratories, it had found that 68.4 per cent of the samples were non-conforming (adulterated) to its standards.

“Total of 1791 samples of milk were randomly collected from 33 states with a good mix of rural and urban areas as well as packaged and loose milk…. After analysis 565 (31.5 per cent) samples were found to be conforming to the FSSAI standards whereas 1226 (68.4 per cent) samples of milk were found to be non-conforming.

“The non-conforming of samples in rural areas were 381 (31 per cent) out of which 64 (16.7 per cent) were packet samples and 317 (83.2 per cent) were loose sample respectively and in urban areas the total non-conforming samples were 845 (68.9 per cent) out of which 282 (33 per cent) were packed and 563 (66.6 per cent) were loose samples,” the Centre said.

The PIL said that the alarming situation and imminent danger to public health requires immediate action on the part of the central government and the state governments to ensure supply of healthy, hygienic and natural milk to the citizens of India.

We are not sure what actions were taken by the Authorities. It’s better you buy Milk direct from trusted sources, else better avoid Milk and use any other nutrition equivalent. Sick of these people and they do anything for money!!! 

Related Articles :

Supreme Court asks state governments to curb sale of adulterated milk

Milkman caught selling synthetic milk in Kareli

India: 68 p.c. of milk sample adulterated: Ministry