A Letter to Mighty Raju – An Elephant rescued after 50 yrs

I am writing this letter to this rescued, humble Elephant called Raju, who suffered 50 years of brutality in spiked chains 24 hours a day. I write this with sincere thanks to Wildlife SOS, who are the real heroes who rescued Raju.

Mighty Raju Elephant

Dear Mighty Raju, 

I could feel your tears. I could feel somehow happiness, at least now you are free, I don’t know whether you can feel the same happiness as we do or not? May be you feel “At least I can live my later part of my life, with just the scars, not wounds of the spiked chains, anymore.”

Oh Mighty Raju! I confess one truth to you, we humans are weak. We are almost like an insect when compared to your strength and size. But somehow we went to the top of the ladder by mistake, God might know the answer why? I feel sad, sorry and shameful for belonging to the same species which hurt your soul these long years. However, I could pacify myself by consoling you with a lullaby I suppose, you never heard before.

And I Hope now you believe as I do, that not all the humans are bad.

Mighty Raju! Please believe in my words, those millions of people who care only about themselves are selfish, the ones who hurt you also belongs to that category. On the other side, we are there, millions of people who care about the billions of souls like yours. There are people like Wildlife SOS. Our care is true, and more powerful than those cruel selfish people’s.

We won’t lose the battle to those selfish people, because we have got a Mighty Raju on our side to crush them 🙂 

Take care Mighty Raju 🙂 Have a good time ahead.

With Love,

Din


Raju has been held in spiked chains, often beaten or otherwise abused for most of his life, so thanks to Wildlife SOS a midnight mission was orchestrated to rescue Raju from the Uttar Pradesh area in India.

According to E! News, “Raju has spent the past 50 years living a pitiful existence in chains 24 hours a day, an act of intolerable cruelty. The team was astounded to see tears roll down his face during the rescue. It was so incredibly emotional for all of us. We knew in our hearts he realized he was being freed,” Wildlife SOS spokesperson Pooja Binepal said.

Now the elephant will know what it is like to walk without puncturing shackles and what it’s like to not suffer any more.

via (http://news92fm.com/)

Courtesy : Wildlife SOS, News92 FM and WordPress


Earth Our Home Too : Snow Leopards

You must know this marvelous cat’s name which “Mac OS X” also carries. The Snow Leopard (Panthera uncia) is a large cat native to the mountain ranges of Central and South Asia. It is listed as endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species because as of 2003, the size of the global population was estimated at 4,080-6,590 adults, of which fewer than 2,500 individuals may reproduce in the wild.

Unusually among cats, snow leopards also eat a significant amount of vegetation, including grass and twigs.

The snow leopard is the National Heritage Animal of Pakistan. The snow leopard is distributed from the west of Lake Baikal through southern Siberia, in the Kunlun Mountains, in the Russian Altai mountainsSayan and Tannu-Ola Mountains, in the Tian Shan, across KazakhstanKyrgyzstanTajikistan, and Uzbekistan to the Hindu Kush in eastern AfghanistanKarakoram in northern Pakistan, in the Pamir Mountains, and in the high altitudes of the Himalayas in IndiaNepal, and Bhutan, and the Tibetan Plateau. In Mongolia, it is found in the Mongolian and Gobi Altai and the Khangai Mountains. In Tibet, it is found up to the Altyn-Tagh in the north.

The snow leopard cannot roar, despite possessing partial ossification of the hyoid bone. This partial ossification was previously thought to be essential for allowing the big cats to roar, but new studies show the ability to roar is due to other morphological features, especially of the larynx, which are absent in the snow leopard. Snow leopard vocalizations include hisses,chuffing, mews, growls, and wailing.

File:Snow leopard portrait.jpg

Snow leopards are slightly smaller than the other big cats but, like them, exhibit a range of sizes, generally weighing between 27 and 55 kg (60 and 121 lb), with an occasional large male reaching 75 kg (165 lb) and small female of under 25 kg (55 lb).They have a relatively short body, measuring in length from the head to the base of the tail 75 to 130 cm (30 to 50 in). However, the tail is quite long, at 80 to 100 cm (31 to 39 in), with only the domestic-cat-sized marbled cat being relatively longer-tailed. They are stocky and short-legged big cats, standing about 60 cm (24 in) at the shoulder.

Snow leopards have long, thick fur, and their base color varies from smoky gray to yellowish tan, with whitish underparts. They have dark grey to black open rosettes on their bodies, with small spots of the same color on their heads and larger spots on their legs and tails. Unusually among cats, their eyes are pale green or grey in color.

File:Schneeleopard P1040242.jpg

Snow leopards show several adaptations for living in a cold, mountainous environment. Their bodies are stocky, their fur is thick, and their ears are small and rounded, all of which help to minimize heat loss. Their paws are wide, which distributes their weight better for walking on snow, and have fur on their undersides to increase their grip on steep and unstable surfaces; it also helps to minimize heat loss. Snow leopards’ tails are long and flexible, helping them to maintain their balance, which is very important in the rocky terrain they inhabit. Their tails are also very thick due to storage of fat and are very thickly covered with fur which allows them to be used like a blanket to protect their faces when asleep.

File:Léopard des neiges 14081.jpg File:Uncia uncia.jpg

The snow leopard is solitary, except for females with cubs. They rear them in dens in the mountains for extended periods. Snow leopards are carnivores and actively hunt their prey. Like many cats, they are also opportunistic feeders, eating whatever meat they can find, including carrion and domestic livestock. They can kill animals more than three to four times their own weight, such as the bharalHimalayan tahrmarkhor and argali, but will readily take much smaller prey, such as hares and birds. They are capable of killing most animals in their range with the probable exception of the adult male yak

File:Lightmatter snowleopard.jpg

Litter sizes vary from one to five cubs, but the average is 2.2. The cubs are blind and helpless at birth, although already with a thick coat of fur, and weigh from 320 to 567 g (11.3 to 20.0 oz). Their eyes open at around seven days, and the cubs can walk at five weeks and are fully weaned by 10 weeks. The cubs leave the den when they are around two to four months of age, but remain with their mother until they become independent after around 18–22 months. 

File:SnowCubs01.jpg

Range Country Habitat Area
(km2)
Estimated
Population
Afghanistan 50,000 100–200?
Bhutan 15,000 100–200?
China 1,100,000 2,000–2,500
India 75,000 200–600
Kazakhstan 50,000 180–200
Kyrgyzstan 105,000 150–500
Mongolia 101,000 500–1,000
Nepal 30,000 300–500
Pakistan 80,000 200–420
Tajikistan 100,000 180–220
Uzbekistan 10,000 20–50

There are also approximately 600 snow leopards in zoos around the world.


Courtesy : Wikipedia

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Earth Our Home Too : Parrots

parrots10

The parrot is a medium sized group of birds, with the parrot being best known for it’s extremely brightly coloured feathers, and the ability of some parrot species to talk, as these species of parrots are able to mimic sounds made by other animals such as humans.

There are thought to be over 350 species of parrot worldwide, ranging across rainforest regions of the Southern Hemisphere. The parrot tends to inhabit densely forested areas, where the parrot hunts insects and small mammals, as well as eating nuts, seeds and fruits.

The parrot can grow between 8cm and 1m, depending on the parrot species. The pygmy parrot is the smallest species of parrot in the world, growing to around the same size as an adult human’s finger. The pygmy parrot is found in the jungles of Papua New Guinea. The Hyacinth Macaw is the largest species of parrot in the world, growing to more than a meter in height and native to the jungles of central and eastern South America. However, the endangered kakapoof New Zealand can often be heavier than the Hyacinth Macaw, with the kakapooften reaching more than 3kg in weight.

The parrot is believed to be one of the most intelligent of all the bird species, mainly in the sense that parrots are able to replicate (mimic) the noises made around them. Some parrots are able to mimic modern sounds and human voices to almost perfection. One African grey parrot was found to have a vocabulary of more than 800 words!

Nearly all of the different parrot species around the world are known to live for a long time, particularly in comparison to other species of bird (even other species of animal). The average lifespan of the parrot is around 60 years, although it is not uncommon for parrots be much older ages, as many parrot individuals have reached the age of 100.

Parrots are identifiable by a number of their features, the brightly coloured feathers of the parrot being the most obvious one. Parrots are known to have sharp, curved beaks which help parrots to crack nuts open more easily and to access fruits on the trees. Parrots also have strong legs, but are most well known for the fact that there are four toes on each of the parrot’s two feet, two of these toes faces forwards and the other two toes face backwards. These remarkable feet help the parrot not only to perch on tree branches more easily, but also aid the parrot in climbing tree trunks or clambering through the dense jungle foliage.

Parrot populations are rapidly declining mainly due to deforestation and therefore destruction of the parrot’s natural habitat. Parrots are also a popular animal in the exotic pet trade and are trapped in the wild to be delivered to homes around the world.

Parrots are found on all tropical and subtropical continents, including Australia and Oceania, South Asia, Southeast Asia, Central America, South America and Africa. Caribbean and some Pacific islands are home to endemic species. By far the greatest number of parrot species comes from Australasia and South America. 

Due to their large size (of the majority of parrot species) and intelligence, parrots have few natural predators in the wild. The human trapping and hunting parrots, is the main predator of the parrot along with monkeys, snakes and large birds of prey that tend to feed more on the eggs of the parrot rather than the bird itself.

The diet of parrots consists of seeds, fruit, nectar, pollen, buds, and sometimes arthropods and other animal prey. The most important of these for most true parrots and cockatoos are seeds; the evolution of the large and powerful bill can be explained primarily as an adaptation to opening and consuming seeds. 

___

Courtesy : Google, Wikipedia, AtoZanimals.com

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