Know : Commuting Dangerously @ 1500 feet Everyday

If you think your commute is stressful, you really need to take a look at this remote village in China. Both adults and children of Yushan take a villager-made cable car to and from work and school. At one 1 kilometer long and over 1,500 feet above the ground, this cable car system makes whatever you take to get around look like a sports car. This is all before you factor in how the cable cars don’t provide any sort of warmth or shelter.

  • Yushan village in China’s Hefeng county built cable car two decades ago
  • Now it carries people and supplies daily saving grueling trip down valley
  • Allows children to go to school and adults to commute to work
  • Cables strung between two cliff faces and no accidents reported so far

Yushan (1) Yushan (2) Yushan (3) Yushan (4) Yushan (5)


Courtesy and Source :  DailyMail

Amazing Arts & Artists : Sketch Photography by Sébastien Del Grosso

Sébastien Del Grosso is a French artist and a photographer, who will allow you to enter the world of surrealism, which combines photography and hand-drawn art. His works masterfully blur the transition between the real photo and the picture. By viewing his works, we can see that Sébastien is not only a master of creating photo illusions, but also a person who tries to show his inner world through his art. His emotions, his feelings, his fears and desires are all vividly and skillfully expressed in simple strokes of a pencil. He is the continuation of his art. So much so, that he loses his identity, fearing it, but being unable to stop.

Sébastien Del Grosso (1) Sébastien Del Grosso (2) Sébastien Del Grosso (3) Sébastien Del Grosso (4) Sébastien Del Grosso (5) Sébastien Del Grosso (6) Sébastien Del Grosso (7) Sébastien Del Grosso (8) Sébastien Del Grosso (9) Sébastien Del Grosso (10) Sébastien Del Grosso (11) Sébastien Del Grosso (12) Sébastien Del Grosso (13)


Image Courtesy : Sebastien Del Grosso

Appreciate Talent : Arina Pozdnyak : Perpetual Calendar

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February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

We place too much value into something as elusive as time. This is the lesson that Arina Pozdnyak, the creator of Perpetual Calendar, is trying to teach us. Days fly by, and even months are mere speckles of sand in an hourglass of eternity. People do not realize that the time given to us by fate cannot be measured using months or even years. It is measured using emotions and impressions. If a person lives to be 150 years old without experiencing any emotions, he might as well have lived one day, for all it’s worth. On the other hand, a person who lived an exciting, fulfilling life, read countless books and cherished every moment that he had, is actually the one who lived a longer life, even if in reality his flame was snuffed out much too soon.


Courtesy : Arina Pozdnyak


Amazing Arts and Artists : Illustrations by Luna Portnoi

Every second Luna paints a thousand colors. Inspiration is a constant in her, something that flows almost like breathing. Your life is art and art is life, how to express what is in his soul and heart.

On paper, you can create artwork with a great level of detail. Explore in corners, investigates textures. On canvas, seeking relief, apply different materials, mixing colors. There her art becomes more abstract, organic and expressive. When painting shoes, forms become functional, and are increasingly wanting to have a unique pattern and colors take on their feet.

For Luna, shapes and colors transcend herself. The connect with the entire universe. If allowed to play, flow, form messages. Because the engine that generates all the art is its heart.


Courtesy and Source: FlickrFacebook


Disclaimer: All the arts here are shared for inspiring and educational purposes only. The Original Artist owns all the copyrights.

Earth Our Home Too : Quokka : The Happiest Animal

Quokka (8)

Quokka – Sounds like an Avatar animal’s name? No! They are living along with us in our very mother Earth. One of the friendliest animals to human beings. Referred to as the happiest animal on the earth. But they are an endangered species. 😦

The quokka the only member of the genus Setonix, is a small macropod about the size of a domestic cat. Like other marsupials in the macropod family (such as the kangaroos and wallabies), the quokka is herbivorous and mainly nocturnal. It can be found on some smaller islands off the coast of Western Australia.

The quokka was one of the first Australian mammals seen by Europeans. The word quokka is derived from a Nyungar word, which was probably gwaga.

Setonix brachyurus distribution.svgThe quokka weighs 2.5 to 5 kilograms (5.5 to 11.0 lb) and is 40 to 90 centimetres (16 to 35 in) long with a 25 to 30 centimetres (9.8 to 11.8 in)-long tail, which is fairly short for a macropod. It has a stocky build, rounded ears, and a short, broad head. Although looking rather like a very small kangaroo, it can climb small trees and shrubs. Its coarse fur is a grizzled brown colour, fading to buff underneath.

The quokka has no fear of humans and it is common for it to approach them closely, particularly on Rottnest Island. It is, however, illegal for members of the public on Rottnest Island to handle the animals in any way. An infringement notice carrying aA$300 fine can be issued by the Rottnest Island Authority for such behaviour. In addition, prosecution of the offense can result in a fine of up to $2,000.

In the wild, its roaming is restricted to a very small range in the South-West of Western Australia, with a number of small scattered populations on the mainland, one large population on Rottnest Island and a smaller population on Bald Island near Albany. The islands are free of foxes and cats. On Rottnest, quokkas are common and occupy a variety of habitats ranging from semi-arid scrub to cultivated gardens.

Although numerous on the small offshore islands, it has a very restricted range and is classified as vulnerable. On the mainland, where it is threatened by most introduced predatory species such as foxes, it requires dense ground cover for refuge. Clearfell logging and agricultural development have reduced this habitat, thus contributing to the decline of the species. The introduction of cats and dogs, as well as dingoes, has added to the problem, as has the clearing and burning of the remaining (swamp) lands. Moreover, Quokkas usually have a litter size of one and successfully rear one young each year. Although these animals are constantly mating, usually one day after their young is born, the small litter size paired with the restricted space and threatening predators contribute to the scarcity of these marsupials on the mainland.


Courtesy : Wikipedia