Food We Eat : List of Edible Seaweeds

Arame

Arame (Eisenia bicyclis, syn. Ecklonia bicyclis), sea oak is a species of kelp best known for its use in Japanese cuisine.


Badderlocks (Alaria esculenta)

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Alaria esculenta is an edible seaweed, also known as dabberlocks or badderlocks, or winged kelp. It is a traditional food along the coasts of the far north Atlantic Ocean. It may be eaten fresh or cooked in Greenland, Iceland, Scotland and Ireland. It is the only one of twelve species of Alaria to occur in both Ireland and in the British Isles


Bladderwrack (Fucus vesiculosus)

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Fucus vesiculosus, known by the common name bladder wrack or bladderwrack, is a seaweed found on the coasts of the North Sea, the western Baltic Sea, and the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, also known by the common names black tang,rockweed, bladder fucus, sea oak, black tany, cut weed, dyers fucus, red fucus, and rock wrack. It was the original source of iodine, discovered in 1811, and was used extensively to treat goitre, a swelling of the thyroid gland related toiodine deficiency.


Carola (various species of Callophyllis)

Callophyllis is a red algae genus in the family Kallymeniaceae. Several species are exploited as edible seaweedsunder the common name carola, most commonly Callophyllis variegata.


Carrageen moss (Mastocarpus stellatus)

Mastocarpus stellatus

Mastocarpus stellatus, also called Clúimhín Cait (cats’ puff), carragheen, or false Irish moss, is a species of red algaeclosely related to Irish Moss, or Chondrus crispus. It is collected in Ireland and Scotland, together with Chondrus crispus asIrish moss, dried, and sold for cooking and as the basis for a drink reputed to ward off colds and flu.


Channelled wrack (Pelvetia canaliculata)

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Pelvetia canaliculata, channelled wrack, is a very common brown alga (Phaeophyceae) found on the rocks of the upper shores of Europe. It is the only species remaining in the monotypic genus Pelvetia. In 1999, the other members of this genus were reclassified as Silvetia due to differences of oogonium structure and of nucleic acid sequences of the rDNA


Chlorella (Chlorella sp.)

chlorella

Chlorella is a genus of single-cell green algae belonging to the phylum Chlorophyta. It is spherical in shape, about 2 to 10μm in diameter, and is without flagella. Chlorella contains the green photosynthetic pigments chlorophyll-a and -b in its chloroplast. Many people believed Chlorella could serve as a potential source of food and energy because its photosynthetic efficiency can, in theory, reach 8%, comparable with other highly efficient crops such as sugar cane.


Cochayuyo (Durvillaea antarctica)

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In Chilean Cuisine, the Durvillaea antarctica (Quechua: cochayuyo : Cocha: Lake, and yuyo: weed) stem and holdfast, known as hulte is used for different recipes, like salads and stews. Durvillaea antarctica or Cochayuyo is a large, robust bull kelp species and the dominant seaweed in southernNew Zealand and Chile. D. antarctica has a circumpolar distribution between the latitudes of 29°S (in Chile) and 55°S (on Macquarie Island)


Dulse (Palmaria palmata)

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Dulse is a good source of minerals and vitamins compared with other vegetables, contains all trace elements needed by humans, and has a high protein content. Palmaria palmata, also called dulse, dillisk or dilsk (from Irish/Scottish Gaelic duileasc/duileasg), red dulse, sea lettuce flakes or creathnach, is a red alga (Rhodophyta) previously referred to as Rhodymenia palmata. It grows on the northern coasts of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. It is a well-known snack food. In Iceland, where it is known as söl, it has been an important source of fibre throughout the centuries.


Ecklonia cava (Ecklonia cava)

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Ecklonia cava is an edible marine brown alga species found in the ocean off Japan and Korea.

It is used as a herbal remedy in the form of an extract called Seanol, a polyphenolic extract. Another phlorotannin-rich natural agent, Ventol, is also extracted from E. cava


Eucheuma ( Eucheuma spinosum, Eucheuma cottonii )

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Eucheuma or Guso in the Philippines is a group of red seaweeds/seaplants representing the Tribe Eucheumatoideae used in the production of carrageenan, an important product used in cosmetics, food processing, and industrial uses, as well as a food source for those living in Indonesia and the Philippines. The farming of eucheuma has raised certain environmental issues, mostly centered on the ecology and biodiversity of coastal environments.


Gutweed (Enteromorpha intestinalis)

Ulva

Ulva intestinalis is a green alga in the phylum Chlorophyta, of the genus Ulva (sea lettuce), also known by the common namesgutweed and grass kelp. It can be found in Bering Sea near Alaska, Aleutian islands, Puget Sound, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Russia.[1] Besides this, places it can be found in Israel, and in such European countries as Azores, Belgium, Denmark, Ireland, Norway, Poland, and in such seas as the Baltic and Mediterranean Sea


Gelidiella (Gelidiella acerosa)

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Gelidiella is a genus of red algae (phylum Rhodophyta). Worldwide there 22 other species of Gelidiella, mostly tropical and subtropical. Gelidiella and Gelidium are now both united into one order Gelidiales.


Gracilaria (Gracilaria edulis, Gracilaria corticata)

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Gracilaria is a genus of red algae (Rhodophyta) notable for its economic importance as an agarophyte, as well as its use as a food for humans and various species of shellfish. Various species within the genus are cultivated among Asia, South America, Africa and OceaniaGracilaria is used as a food in Japanese, Hawaiian, and Filipino cuisine. In Japanese cuisine, it is called ogonori or ogo. In the Philippines, it is called gulamanand used to make gelatin, also called gulaman.


Hijiki or Hiziki (Sargassum fusiforme)

Hijiki

Hijiki is a brown sea vegetable growing wild on rocky coastlines around Japan, Korea, and China. Hijiki has been a part of the Japanese diet for centuries. Hijiki is rich in dietary fibre and essential minerals such as calcium, iron, and magnesium. According to Japanese folklore, hijiki aids health and beauty, and thick, black, lustrous hair is connected to regular consumption of small amounts of hijiki.


Hypnea order Gigartinales

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Hypnea is a red algal genus, and a well known carrageenophyte (plant producing polysaccharide carrageenan).


Irish moss (Chondrus crispus)

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Chondrus crispus — commonly called Irish moss or carrageen moss (Irish carraigín, “little rock”) — is a species of red algae which grows abundantly along the rocky parts of the Atlantic coast of Europe and North America. In its fresh condition this protist is soft and cartilaginous, varying in color from a greenish-yellow, through red, to a dark purple or purplish-brown. The principal constituent is a mucilaginous body, made of the polysaccharide carrageenan, which constitutes 55% of its weight. The organism also consists of nearly 10% protein and about 15% mineral matter, and is rich in iodine and sulfur. When softened in water it has a sea-like odour and because of the abundant cell wall polysaccharides it will form a jellywhen boiled, containing from 20 to 100 times its weight of water.


Kombu (Saccharina japonica)

Kombu

Kombu is edible kelp from the family Laminariaceae and is widely eaten in East Asia.  Most kombu is from the species Saccharina japonica (Laminaria japonica), extensively cultivated on ropes in the seas of Japan and Korea. With the development of cultivation technology, over 90% of Japanese kombu is cultivated, mostly in Hokkaidō, but also as far south as the Seto Inland Sea.


Laver (Porphyra laciniata/Porphyra umbilicalis)

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Laver is an edible, littoral alga (seaweed). In Wales, laver is used for making laverbread, a traditional Welsh dish. Laver as food is also commonly found around the west coast of Britain and east coast of Ireland along the Irish Sea, where it is known as slake.


Limu Kala (Sargassum echinocarpum)

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Sargassum is a genus of brown (class Phaeophyceae) macroalgae (seaweed) in the order Fucales. Numerous species are distributed throughout the temperate and tropical oceans of the world, where they generally inhabit shallow water and coral reefs, and the genus is widely known for its planktonic (free-floating) species. Sargassum is also cultivated and cleaned for use as an herbal remedy. Many Chinese herbalists prescribe powderedSargassum in paper packets of 0.5 gram, to be dissolved in warm water and drunk as a tea.


Mozuku (Cladosiphon okamuranus)

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Cladosiphon okamuranus is a type of edible seaweed in the genus Cladosiphon, naturally found in Okinawa, Japan. Most of the mozuku now is farmed by locals, and sold to processing factories. The main use of mozuku is as food, and as source of one type of sulfated polysaccharide called Fucoidan to be used in cancer treatment aid health supplements.


Nori (Porphyra)

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Nori is the Japanese name for edible seaweed species of the red algae genus Porphyra, including P. yezoensis and P. tenera. Nori is familiar in the United States and other countries as an ingredient of sushi, being referred to as “nori” (as the Japanese do) or simply as seaweed. Finished products are made by a shredding and rack-drying process that resembles papermaking. Porphyra is also called laver in Wales and other English-speaking countries


Oarweed (Laminaria digitata)

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Laminaria digitata is a large brown alga in the family Laminariaceae, also known by the common name Oarweed. It is found in the sublittoral zone of the northern Atlantic OceanL digitata was traditionally used as a fertiliser and spread on the land. In the 18th century it was burnt to extract the potash it contained for use in the glass industry. In the 19th century it was used for the extraction of iodine. Both these uses died out when cheaper sources for these products became available. It is still used as an organic fertiliser but also for the extraction of alginic acid, the manufacture of toothpastes and cosmetics, and in the food industry for binding, thickening and moulding.


Ogonori (Gracilaria)

Ogo

Ogonori (Gracilaria spp.), also called ogo or sea moss, is a type of edible seaweed eaten along the coasts of Japan,Southeast Asia, Hawaii, and the Caribbean. Ogonori is typically eaten cold and is a source of the thickener agar.


Sugar kelp (Saccharina latissima)

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Saccharina latissima is a brown algae (class Phaeophyceae), of the family Laminariaceae. It is also known by the common names sea belt and Devil’s apron, due to its shape. It is found in the north east Atlantic Ocean and the Barents Seasouth to Galicia in Spain. It is not found in the Bay of Biscay but is common round the coasts of the British Isles. The species is found at sheltered rocky seabeds.


Sea grapes or green caviar (Caulerpa lentillifera)

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Caulerpa lentillifera is one of the favored species of edible Caulerpa due to its soft and succulent texture. They are also known as sea grapes or green caviar. C. lentillifera is farmed in the Philippines, where it is locally called ar-arosep,lato,arosep or ar-arosip (as variant names), latok in the Malaysian state of Sabah, and in Okinawa where the plant is eaten fresh. C. lentillifera is usually eaten raw with vinegar, as a snack or in a salad. In the Philippines, after being washed in clean water, it is usually eaten raw as a salad, mixed with chopped raw onions and fresh tomatoes, and dressed with a blend of fish sauce or fish paste (locally called bagoong) and vinegar. It is known to be rich in iodine.


Sargassum (Sargassum cinetum, Sargassum vulgare, Sargassum swartzii, Sargassum myriocysum)

Sargassum_weeds_closeup

Sargassum is a genus of brown (class Phaeophyceae) macroalgae (seaweed) in the order Fucales. Numerous species are distributed throughout the temperate and tropical oceans of the world, where they generally inhabit shallow water and coral reefs, and the genus is widely known for its planktonic (free-floating) species.


Sea lettuce (various species of the genus Ulva)

Sea Lettuce

The sea lettuces comprise the genus Ulva, a group of edible green algae that is widely distributed along the coasts of the world’s oceans. The type species within the genus Ulva is Ulva lactuca, lactuca being Latin for “lettuce”. Sea lettuce is eaten by a number of different sea animals, including manatees and the sea slugs known as sea hares. Many species of sea lettuce are a food source for humans in Scandinavia, Great Britain, Ireland, China, and Japan (where this food is known as aosa). Sea lettuce as a food for humans is eaten raw in salads and cooked in soups. It is high in protein, soluble dietary fiber, and a variety of vitamins and minerals, especially iron.


Spiral wrack (Fucus spiralis)

Fucus Spiralis

Fucus spiralis is a species of seaweed, a brown alga (Heterokontophyta, Phaeophyceae), living on the littoral shore of the Atlantic coasts of Europe and North America. It has the common names of spiral wrack and flat wrack.


Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis and Arthrospira maxima)

Spirulina

Spirulina is a cyanobacterium that can be consumed by humans and other animals. There are two species, Arthrospira platensis and Arthrospira maxima.

Arthrospira is cultivated worldwide; used as a dietary supplement as well as a whole food; and is also available in tablet, flake and powder form. It is also used as a feed supplement in the aquaculture, aquarium and poultry industries


Thongweed (Himanthalia elongata)

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Himanthalia elongata is a brown alga in the order Fucales, also known by the common names thongweed, sea thongand sea spaghetti. It is found in the north east Atlantic Ocean and the North Sea.


Wakame (Undaria pinnatifida) & Hiromi (Undaria undarioides)

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Wakame a sea vegetable, or edible seaweed. It has a subtly sweet flavour and is most often served in soups and salads. Sea-farmers have grown wakame in Japan from the Nara period. It has been nominated as among 100 of the world’s worst invasive species according to the Global Invasive Species Database.

Wakame fronds are green and have a subtly sweet flavour and satiny texture. The leaves should be cut into small pieces as they will expand during cooking.

In Japan and Europe, wakame is distributed either dried or salted, and used in soups (particularly miso soup), and salads (tofu salad), or often simply as a side dish to tofu and a salad vegetable like cucumber. These dishes are typically dressed with soy sauce and vinegar/rice vinegar.

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Know : 22 Reasons : Why We Need Trees?

Trees combat the climate change

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Excess carbon dioxide (CO2) caused by many factors is a building up in our atmosphere and contributing to climate change. Trees absorb CO2, removing and storing the carbon while releasing the oxygen back into the air. In one year, an acre of mature trees absorbs the amount of CO2 produced when you drive your car 26,000 miles.

Trees clean the air

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Trees absorb odors and pollutant gases (nitrogen oxides, ammonia, sulfur dioxide and ozone) and filter particulates out of the air by trapping them on their leaves and bark.

Trees provide oxygen

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In one year an acre of mature trees can provide enough oxygen for 18 people.

Trees cool the streets and the city

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Average temperatures in Los Angeles have risen 6°F in the last 50 years as tree coverage has declined and the number of heat-absorbing roads and buildings has increased.
Trees cool the city by up to 10°F, by shading our homes and streets, breaking up urban “heat islands” and releasing water vapor into the air through their leaves.

Trees conserve energy

Conservation_Grows_on_Trees_by_Emma_Gray

Three trees placed strategically around a single-family home can cut summer air conditioning needs by up to 50 percent. By reducing the energy demand for cooling our houses, we reduce carbon dioxide and other pollution emissions from power plants.

Trees save water

Forest_Buffers_page_image

Shade from trees slows water evaporation from thirsty lawns. Most newly planted trees need only fifteen gallons of water a week. As trees transpire, they increase atmospheric moisture.

Trees help prevent water pollution

Trees cleans water

Trees reduce runoff by breaking rainfall thus allowing the water to flow down the trunk and into the earth below the tree. This prevents stormwater from carrying pollutants to the ocean. When mulched, trees act like a sponge that filters this water naturally and uses it to recharge groundwater supplies.

Trees help prevent soil erosion

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On hillsides or stream slopes, trees slow runoff and hold soil in place.

Trees shield children from ultra-violet rays

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. Trees reduce UV-B exposure by about 50 percent, thus providing protection to children on school campuses and playgrounds – where children spend hours outdoors.

Trees provide food

Governor's plum

Governor’s plum

An apple tree can yield up to 15-20 bushels of fruit per year and can be planted on the tiniest urban lot. Aside from fruit for humans, trees provide food for birds and wildlife.

Trees heal

Tree heals

Studies have shown that patients with views of trees out their windows heal faster and with less complications. Children with ADHD show fewer symptoms when they have access to nature. Exposure to trees and nature aids concentration by reducing mental fatigue.

Trees reduce violence

Tree reduces violence

Neighborhoods and homes that are barren have shown to have a greater incidence of violence in and out of the home than their greener counterparts. Trees and landscaping help to reduce the level of fear.

Trees mark the seasons

Trees Animated seasons

Is it winter, spring, summer or fall? Look at the trees.

Trees create economic opportunities

the-power-of-shade

Fruit harvested from community orchards can be sold, thus providing income. Small business opportunities in green waste management and landscaping arise when cities value mulching and its water-saving qualities. Vocational training for youth interested in green jobs is also a great way to develop economic opportunities from trees.

Trees are teachers and playmates

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Whether as houses for children or creative and spiritual inspiration for adults, trees have provided the space for human retreat throughout the ages.

Trees bring diverse groups of people together

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Tree plantings provide an opportunity for community involvement and empowerment that improves the quality of life in our neighborhoods. All cultures, ages, and genders have an important role to play at a tree planting or tree care event.

Trees add unity

People sitting under a tree in Placa de Santa Maria, Puigcerda, Sunday morning, August 2011

Trees as landmarks can give a neighborhood a new identity and encourage civic pride.

Trees provide a canopy and habitat for wildlife

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Sycamore and oak are among the many urban species that provide excellent urban homes for birds, bees, possums and squirrels.

Trees block things

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Trees can mask concrete walls or parking lots, and unsightly views. They muffle sound from nearby streets and freeways, and create an eye-soothing canopy of green. Trees absorb dust and wind and reduce glare.

Trees provide wood

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In suburban and rural areas, trees can be selectively harvested for fuel and craft wood.

Trees increase property values

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The beauty of a well-planted property and its surrounding street and neighborhood can raise property values by as much as 15 percent.

Trees increase business traffic

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Studies show that the more trees and landscaping a business district has, the more business will flow in. A tree-lined street will also slow traffic – enough to allow the drivers to look at the store fronts instead of whizzing by.


Courtesy: The Tree People


Know : Top 60 Green Economy Countries

This 4th edition of the GGEI is an in-depth look at how 60 countries perform in the global green economy, as well as how expert practitioners rank this performance and ranks based on perception.

Global Green Economy Index

Performance Rank

SCORE

1 Sweden 68.1
2 Norway 65.9
3 Costa Rica 64.2
4 Germany 63.6
5 Denmark 63.2
6 Switzerland 63.1
7 Austria 63
8 Finland 62.9
9 Iceland 62.6
10 Spain 59.2
11 Ireland 59
12 New Zealand 58.8
13 France 56.4
14 Colombia 56.1
15 Portugal 55.8
16 Peru 55.8
17 Kenya 55.4
18 Brazil 55.3
19 Chile 55.1
20 United Kingdom 54.6
21 Netherlands 54.2
22 Uruguay 54.1
23 Mauritius 51.5
24 Zambia 51.3
25 Italy 51.2
26 Ethiopia 50.6
27 Rwanda 50.4
28 United States 50.1
29 Canada 49.6
30 Taiwan 47.5
31 Mexico 47.4
32 Philippines 47.2
33 Israel 47
34 South Africa 46.8
35 Malaysia 46.4
36 Tanzania 46.2
37 Australia 46.1
38 Czech Republic 46
39 South Korea 45.6
40 United Arab Emirates 45.6
41 Burkina Faso 45.2
42 Cambodia 44.9
43 Turkey 44.8
44 Japan 44.6
45 Thailand 44.5
46 Ghana 44.5
47 Belgium 44.1
48 Argentina 43.8
49 India 43.4
50 Slovakia 43
51 Panama 41.5
52 Morocco 41.5
53 Mozambique 41
54 Indonesia 40.3
55 China 40.1
56 Poland 37.1
57 Senegal 33.4
58 Qatar 33.3
59 Vietnam 32.2
60 Mongolia 29.5

India Green Rank

Climate Change Performance

The perception survey for the 2014 GGEI was conducted from June through August 2014, and polled targeted respondents on how they assessed national green performance on the four main dimensions of Leadership & Climate Change, Efficiency Sectors, Markets & Investment, and Environment & Natural Capital.

Perception Rank

SCORE

1 Germany 93.6
2 Denmark 92.8
3 Sweden 90.2
4 Norway 84.8
5 Netherlands 84
6 United States 76.2
7 Japan 72.4
8 United Kingdom 71.6
9 Finland 70.2
10 Switzerland 67.8
11 Australia 66.3
12 Canada 63
13 China 61.6
14 Costa Rica 60.4
15 Brazil 59.7
16 India 56.1
17 Austria 55.1
18 New Zealand 52
19 Iceland 49.1
20 France 48.5
21 Spain 46.7
22 South Africa 45.8
23 South Korea 44.1
24 Israel 41.1
25 United Arab Emirates 40.3
26 Kenya 40
27 Malaysia 39.3
28 Mexico 37.1
29 Italy 36.1
30 Belgium 36
31 Indonesia 35.3
32 Peru 35
33 Ireland 34.3
34 Mauritius 34
35 Chile 33.5
36 Tanzania 33.3
37 Ethiopia 33.1
38 Philippines 33
39 Morocco 32.6
40 Portugal 32.5
41 Colombia 31.6
42 Poland 31.5
43 Qatar 31.2
44 Turkey 31.2
45 Vietnam 31.1
46 Taiwan 30.7
47 Argentina 30.2
48 Rwanda 30.1
49 Zambia 30
50 Mozambique 29.8
51 Thailand 29.3
52 Czech Republic 29.2
53 Cambodia 28.9
54 Ghana 28.7
55 Burkina Faso 28.5
56 Slovakia 28.2
57 Mongolia 27.7
58 Uruguay 27.6
59 Panama 27.4
60 Senegal 27.3

Germany (perception) and Sweden (performance) top the 2014 GGEI, confirming a trend observed in prior editions of strong results by Germany and the Nordic states. Besides performing well on both the economic and environmental areas of the GGEI, these nations display consistent green leadership and receive global recognition for it.

Covered for the first time in this edition, Costa Rica performs extremely well, ranking third on the GGEI performance measure behind Sweden and Norway and receiving strong recognition on the perception survey, an impressive result for such a small country.

Like in 2012, Copenhagen is the top green city as ranked by our survey of global experts, reinforcing the continued strength of the Danish green brand. Tracked for the first time this year, Vancouver and Singapore also rank in the top 10 of green cities.

Many of the fastest growing economies in the world rank poorly on the GGEI performance measure, highlighting an urgent need to reorient their economies to greener

growth pathways. Regionally, these countries are mostly in Africa (Ghana), the Gulf (Qatar, United Arab Emirates), and Asia (Cambodia, China, Thailand, Vietnam)

There are concerning results related to more developed countries as well – notably Australia, Japan, the Netherlands and the United States – where perceptions of their green economic performance dramatically exceed their actual performance on the GGEI. These countries appear to receive more credit than they deserve, an information gap that requires further exploration.

Despite its leadership founding the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI), South Korea continues not to register as a green country brand on our survey and performs poorly, ranked 39th out of 60 on this year’s GGEI. Despite better perception results, Japan also performs poorly on the 2014 GGEI, ranked 44th out of 60.

While the United Kingdom performs adequately in most areas of the GGEI, it doesn’t excel on any one topic, possibly due to inconsistent political rhetoric and policy related to green economy there. While gradually improving in each successive GGEI edition, the UK still lags behind its northern European and Nordic competitors.

Five European nations – Austria, Iceland, Ireland, Portugal and Spain – reveal performance scores that exceed their perception ones significantly – signaling an urgent need for better strategic communications and information exchange of their green merits and associated investment opportunities.

The GGEI results reveal a similar observation for a variety of non-European states – including Ethiopia, Mauritius, Rwanda in Africa and Colombia, Chile and Peru in Latin America – again suggesting a need for these states to better position their green economies on the international stage.


Courtesy and Source : GGEI-Report 2014 by DUAL CITIZEN LLC

Disclaimer: All the rights of the data and the study belong to DUAL CITIZEN LLC. We have shared the info here for educational purposes only. We do not own any info above or the rights.


Books : “The Dirt We Eat” and “Fake Truth”

Two Projects

Many questioned me “What is Propel Steps? What are you doing now? that too in a small town!”

I believe in Einstein’s saying “If you can’t explain it simply, you don’t understand it well enough.”

So I answered them “I am building an organization to bring social changes via Education. Propel Steps will enable students and the society by educating them on what is not taught in the current education system!”

Explaining any issue can be simple, but solving the issue is complex. I aimed to do the both via ‪#‎PropelSteps‬. After almost two years of home work, learning and hard work. Now I am changing the gears.

Propel Steps : Education is Everything is shaping up at a great pace and magnitude now.

“The Dirt We Eat” and “Fake Truth” the unique twin projects will be our second milestone after the completion of Voice Of Little Hearts.

I need your support friends. Whatever may be your expertise you can share your knowledge to make this society better. That is what education is all about.

Join us if you like us. We shall make new roads.

Everyday is Earth Day!

Image Courtesy : Steve Sack

Image Courtesy : Steve Sack


Disclaimer : We do not own any of these cartoons / Images. All rights reserved to the respective artists. Shared here for awareness and educational purposes only.