Alert! : Will India #BAN #Ajinomoto?

This will reveal the pathetic state of ‪#‎Indian‬ ‪#‎Food‬ ‪#‎Safety‬. Will India ban Ajinomoto now?

‪#‎Maggi‬ row has made everyone talk about MSG aka Monosodium Glutamate.

But we people are so unaware / lethargic to be frank.

This MSG is also called as Ajinomoto. Which is widely used across India in most of the foods in many hotels and processed foods like noodles.

Last time when you ate fried rice, you consumed the same MSG for which Maggi is banned now.

On 2005 itself a gentleman called ‪#‎DEEPANKAR‬ ‪#‎GANGULY‬ wrote about MSG on a Kolkata newspaper The Telegraph.

That article was just an example, many newspapers media might have wrote about MSG. But what is the use when they gave voice and the govt. or ‪#‎FSSAI‬ not listening to it?

When you know some ingredient is harmful.. why it is given permission under permissible limits? It is insane to trust business-minded world. Are they going to check every time when a cook sprinkles a handful of ajinomoto on the food which children gonna eat? NO.

Now it is up to the GOVT and FSSAI to ‪#‎BANajinomoto‬ completely.

Here is the article published on The Telegraph before 10 years


“Think twice before you treat your child to a meal of chowmein and chilli chicken. It could impair his mental growth. A snack of potato chips is just as dangerous.

‘Fast food, like rolls, potato chips and chowmein, contain a harmful, taste-enhancing chemical called monosodium glutamate, popularly known as ajinomoto. Unless checked, the effects of this chemical will be more widespread than smoking, since the consumers of fast food outnumber smokers,’ warned Iva Bhattacharya, senior dietician in the state health department and wife of the mayor.

The nutrition division of the department is planning to organise an awareness campaign on the ill-effects of ajinomoto. It also has plans to pressure the state government for a law against use of ajinomoto in food.

Countries like China and Japan have banned the use of ajinomoto in eatables, but the chemical is still indiscriminately used in almost all fast food preparations available in Calcutta, from chanachur to soup.

‘Unfortunately, most parents are not aware of the harm they’re doing to their child by giving them food containing ajinomoto,’ added Bhattacharya.

‘There are other problems as well with fast food. For example, preparation of potato chips involves heating of oil above 400 degrees Centigrade. The high temperature decomposes fatty acids in potatoes. This impairs elasticity of blood vessels and raises blood pressure,’ she said.

According to doctors, Ajinomoto is not only detrimental to the development of brain cells, but is also carcinogenic. It takes around seven to eight years for the harmful effects of the chemical to manifest in children.” – Credits : The Telegraph, Kolkata


However, Ajinimoto is keen on starting it’s own manufacturing unit in India and seeking to access one of the biggest market place in the world. Will India Ban Ajinomoto? or will our government try to risk our lives. We have to wait and watch.

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Food We Eat : List of Edible Seaweeds

Arame

Arame (Eisenia bicyclis, syn. Ecklonia bicyclis), sea oak is a species of kelp best known for its use in Japanese cuisine.


Badderlocks (Alaria esculenta)

dabberlocks

Alaria esculenta is an edible seaweed, also known as dabberlocks or badderlocks, or winged kelp. It is a traditional food along the coasts of the far north Atlantic Ocean. It may be eaten fresh or cooked in Greenland, Iceland, Scotland and Ireland. It is the only one of twelve species of Alaria to occur in both Ireland and in the British Isles


Bladderwrack (Fucus vesiculosus)

640px-Fucus_vesiculosus_Wales

Fucus vesiculosus, known by the common name bladder wrack or bladderwrack, is a seaweed found on the coasts of the North Sea, the western Baltic Sea, and the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, also known by the common names black tang,rockweed, bladder fucus, sea oak, black tany, cut weed, dyers fucus, red fucus, and rock wrack. It was the original source of iodine, discovered in 1811, and was used extensively to treat goitre, a swelling of the thyroid gland related toiodine deficiency.


Carola (various species of Callophyllis)

Callophyllis is a red algae genus in the family Kallymeniaceae. Several species are exploited as edible seaweedsunder the common name carola, most commonly Callophyllis variegata.


Carrageen moss (Mastocarpus stellatus)

Mastocarpus stellatus

Mastocarpus stellatus, also called Clúimhín Cait (cats’ puff), carragheen, or false Irish moss, is a species of red algaeclosely related to Irish Moss, or Chondrus crispus. It is collected in Ireland and Scotland, together with Chondrus crispus asIrish moss, dried, and sold for cooking and as the basis for a drink reputed to ward off colds and flu.


Channelled wrack (Pelvetia canaliculata)

800px-Pelvetia_canaliculata

Pelvetia canaliculata, channelled wrack, is a very common brown alga (Phaeophyceae) found on the rocks of the upper shores of Europe. It is the only species remaining in the monotypic genus Pelvetia. In 1999, the other members of this genus were reclassified as Silvetia due to differences of oogonium structure and of nucleic acid sequences of the rDNA


Chlorella (Chlorella sp.)

chlorella

Chlorella is a genus of single-cell green algae belonging to the phylum Chlorophyta. It is spherical in shape, about 2 to 10μm in diameter, and is without flagella. Chlorella contains the green photosynthetic pigments chlorophyll-a and -b in its chloroplast. Many people believed Chlorella could serve as a potential source of food and energy because its photosynthetic efficiency can, in theory, reach 8%, comparable with other highly efficient crops such as sugar cane.


Cochayuyo (Durvillaea antarctica)

800px-Durvillea_Stipe

In Chilean Cuisine, the Durvillaea antarctica (Quechua: cochayuyo : Cocha: Lake, and yuyo: weed) stem and holdfast, known as hulte is used for different recipes, like salads and stews. Durvillaea antarctica or Cochayuyo is a large, robust bull kelp species and the dominant seaweed in southernNew Zealand and Chile. D. antarctica has a circumpolar distribution between the latitudes of 29°S (in Chile) and 55°S (on Macquarie Island)


Dulse (Palmaria palmata)

308px-Palmeria_palmata

Dulse is a good source of minerals and vitamins compared with other vegetables, contains all trace elements needed by humans, and has a high protein content. Palmaria palmata, also called dulse, dillisk or dilsk (from Irish/Scottish Gaelic duileasc/duileasg), red dulse, sea lettuce flakes or creathnach, is a red alga (Rhodophyta) previously referred to as Rhodymenia palmata. It grows on the northern coasts of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. It is a well-known snack food. In Iceland, where it is known as söl, it has been an important source of fibre throughout the centuries.


Ecklonia cava (Ecklonia cava)

800px-Brown_algae_hi

Ecklonia cava is an edible marine brown alga species found in the ocean off Japan and Korea.

It is used as a herbal remedy in the form of an extract called Seanol, a polyphenolic extract. Another phlorotannin-rich natural agent, Ventol, is also extracted from E. cava


Eucheuma ( Eucheuma spinosum, Eucheuma cottonii )

640px-Eucheuma_Farming

Eucheuma or Guso in the Philippines is a group of red seaweeds/seaplants representing the Tribe Eucheumatoideae used in the production of carrageenan, an important product used in cosmetics, food processing, and industrial uses, as well as a food source for those living in Indonesia and the Philippines. The farming of eucheuma has raised certain environmental issues, mostly centered on the ecology and biodiversity of coastal environments.


Gutweed (Enteromorpha intestinalis)

Ulva

Ulva intestinalis is a green alga in the phylum Chlorophyta, of the genus Ulva (sea lettuce), also known by the common namesgutweed and grass kelp. It can be found in Bering Sea near Alaska, Aleutian islands, Puget Sound, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Russia.[1] Besides this, places it can be found in Israel, and in such European countries as Azores, Belgium, Denmark, Ireland, Norway, Poland, and in such seas as the Baltic and Mediterranean Sea


Gelidiella (Gelidiella acerosa)

Gelidiella-acerosa-02

Gelidiella is a genus of red algae (phylum Rhodophyta). Worldwide there 22 other species of Gelidiella, mostly tropical and subtropical. Gelidiella and Gelidium are now both united into one order Gelidiales.


Gracilaria (Gracilaria edulis, Gracilaria corticata)

800px-Gracilaria2

Gracilaria is a genus of red algae (Rhodophyta) notable for its economic importance as an agarophyte, as well as its use as a food for humans and various species of shellfish. Various species within the genus are cultivated among Asia, South America, Africa and OceaniaGracilaria is used as a food in Japanese, Hawaiian, and Filipino cuisine. In Japanese cuisine, it is called ogonori or ogo. In the Philippines, it is called gulamanand used to make gelatin, also called gulaman.


Hijiki or Hiziki (Sargassum fusiforme)

Hijiki

Hijiki is a brown sea vegetable growing wild on rocky coastlines around Japan, Korea, and China. Hijiki has been a part of the Japanese diet for centuries. Hijiki is rich in dietary fibre and essential minerals such as calcium, iron, and magnesium. According to Japanese folklore, hijiki aids health and beauty, and thick, black, lustrous hair is connected to regular consumption of small amounts of hijiki.


Hypnea order Gigartinales

Hypnea-pannosa-01

Hypnea is a red algal genus, and a well known carrageenophyte (plant producing polysaccharide carrageenan).


Irish moss (Chondrus crispus)

Chondrus_crispus

Chondrus crispus — commonly called Irish moss or carrageen moss (Irish carraigín, “little rock”) — is a species of red algae which grows abundantly along the rocky parts of the Atlantic coast of Europe and North America. In its fresh condition this protist is soft and cartilaginous, varying in color from a greenish-yellow, through red, to a dark purple or purplish-brown. The principal constituent is a mucilaginous body, made of the polysaccharide carrageenan, which constitutes 55% of its weight. The organism also consists of nearly 10% protein and about 15% mineral matter, and is rich in iodine and sulfur. When softened in water it has a sea-like odour and because of the abundant cell wall polysaccharides it will form a jellywhen boiled, containing from 20 to 100 times its weight of water.


Kombu (Saccharina japonica)

Kombu

Kombu is edible kelp from the family Laminariaceae and is widely eaten in East Asia.  Most kombu is from the species Saccharina japonica (Laminaria japonica), extensively cultivated on ropes in the seas of Japan and Korea. With the development of cultivation technology, over 90% of Japanese kombu is cultivated, mostly in Hokkaidō, but also as far south as the Seto Inland Sea.


Laver (Porphyra laciniata/Porphyra umbilicalis)

640px-Porphyra_umbilicalis

Laver is an edible, littoral alga (seaweed). In Wales, laver is used for making laverbread, a traditional Welsh dish. Laver as food is also commonly found around the west coast of Britain and east coast of Ireland along the Irish Sea, where it is known as slake.


Limu Kala (Sargassum echinocarpum)

Sargassum_on_the_beach,_Cuba

Sargassum is a genus of brown (class Phaeophyceae) macroalgae (seaweed) in the order Fucales. Numerous species are distributed throughout the temperate and tropical oceans of the world, where they generally inhabit shallow water and coral reefs, and the genus is widely known for its planktonic (free-floating) species. Sargassum is also cultivated and cleaned for use as an herbal remedy. Many Chinese herbalists prescribe powderedSargassum in paper packets of 0.5 gram, to be dissolved in warm water and drunk as a tea.


Mozuku (Cladosiphon okamuranus)

640px-Japanese_Mozuku

Cladosiphon okamuranus is a type of edible seaweed in the genus Cladosiphon, naturally found in Okinawa, Japan. Most of the mozuku now is farmed by locals, and sold to processing factories. The main use of mozuku is as food, and as source of one type of sulfated polysaccharide called Fucoidan to be used in cancer treatment aid health supplements.


Nori (Porphyra)

605px-Nori

Nori is the Japanese name for edible seaweed species of the red algae genus Porphyra, including P. yezoensis and P. tenera. Nori is familiar in the United States and other countries as an ingredient of sushi, being referred to as “nori” (as the Japanese do) or simply as seaweed. Finished products are made by a shredding and rack-drying process that resembles papermaking. Porphyra is also called laver in Wales and other English-speaking countries


Oarweed (Laminaria digitata)

640px-Laminaria

Laminaria digitata is a large brown alga in the family Laminariaceae, also known by the common name Oarweed. It is found in the sublittoral zone of the northern Atlantic OceanL digitata was traditionally used as a fertiliser and spread on the land. In the 18th century it was burnt to extract the potash it contained for use in the glass industry. In the 19th century it was used for the extraction of iodine. Both these uses died out when cheaper sources for these products became available. It is still used as an organic fertiliser but also for the extraction of alginic acid, the manufacture of toothpastes and cosmetics, and in the food industry for binding, thickening and moulding.


Ogonori (Gracilaria)

Ogo

Ogonori (Gracilaria spp.), also called ogo or sea moss, is a type of edible seaweed eaten along the coasts of Japan,Southeast Asia, Hawaii, and the Caribbean. Ogonori is typically eaten cold and is a source of the thickener agar.


Sugar kelp (Saccharina latissima)

Saccharina_11_600x450_saccharina

Saccharina latissima is a brown algae (class Phaeophyceae), of the family Laminariaceae. It is also known by the common names sea belt and Devil’s apron, due to its shape. It is found in the north east Atlantic Ocean and the Barents Seasouth to Galicia in Spain. It is not found in the Bay of Biscay but is common round the coasts of the British Isles. The species is found at sheltered rocky seabeds.


Sea grapes or green caviar (Caulerpa lentillifera)

640px-Umibudou_at_Miyakojima01s3s2850

Caulerpa lentillifera is one of the favored species of edible Caulerpa due to its soft and succulent texture. They are also known as sea grapes or green caviar. C. lentillifera is farmed in the Philippines, where it is locally called ar-arosep,lato,arosep or ar-arosip (as variant names), latok in the Malaysian state of Sabah, and in Okinawa where the plant is eaten fresh. C. lentillifera is usually eaten raw with vinegar, as a snack or in a salad. In the Philippines, after being washed in clean water, it is usually eaten raw as a salad, mixed with chopped raw onions and fresh tomatoes, and dressed with a blend of fish sauce or fish paste (locally called bagoong) and vinegar. It is known to be rich in iodine.


Sargassum (Sargassum cinetum, Sargassum vulgare, Sargassum swartzii, Sargassum myriocysum)

Sargassum_weeds_closeup

Sargassum is a genus of brown (class Phaeophyceae) macroalgae (seaweed) in the order Fucales. Numerous species are distributed throughout the temperate and tropical oceans of the world, where they generally inhabit shallow water and coral reefs, and the genus is widely known for its planktonic (free-floating) species.


Sea lettuce (various species of the genus Ulva)

Sea Lettuce

The sea lettuces comprise the genus Ulva, a group of edible green algae that is widely distributed along the coasts of the world’s oceans. The type species within the genus Ulva is Ulva lactuca, lactuca being Latin for “lettuce”. Sea lettuce is eaten by a number of different sea animals, including manatees and the sea slugs known as sea hares. Many species of sea lettuce are a food source for humans in Scandinavia, Great Britain, Ireland, China, and Japan (where this food is known as aosa). Sea lettuce as a food for humans is eaten raw in salads and cooked in soups. It is high in protein, soluble dietary fiber, and a variety of vitamins and minerals, especially iron.


Spiral wrack (Fucus spiralis)

Fucus Spiralis

Fucus spiralis is a species of seaweed, a brown alga (Heterokontophyta, Phaeophyceae), living on the littoral shore of the Atlantic coasts of Europe and North America. It has the common names of spiral wrack and flat wrack.


Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis and Arthrospira maxima)

Spirulina

Spirulina is a cyanobacterium that can be consumed by humans and other animals. There are two species, Arthrospira platensis and Arthrospira maxima.

Arthrospira is cultivated worldwide; used as a dietary supplement as well as a whole food; and is also available in tablet, flake and powder form. It is also used as a feed supplement in the aquaculture, aquarium and poultry industries


Thongweed (Himanthalia elongata)

640px-Zeespaghetti

Himanthalia elongata is a brown alga in the order Fucales, also known by the common names thongweed, sea thongand sea spaghetti. It is found in the north east Atlantic Ocean and the North Sea.


Wakame (Undaria pinnatifida) & Hiromi (Undaria undarioides)

640px-Boiled_wakame

Wakame a sea vegetable, or edible seaweed. It has a subtly sweet flavour and is most often served in soups and salads. Sea-farmers have grown wakame in Japan from the Nara period. It has been nominated as among 100 of the world’s worst invasive species according to the Global Invasive Species Database.

Wakame fronds are green and have a subtly sweet flavour and satiny texture. The leaves should be cut into small pieces as they will expand during cooking.

In Japan and Europe, wakame is distributed either dried or salted, and used in soups (particularly miso soup), and salads (tofu salad), or often simply as a side dish to tofu and a salad vegetable like cucumber. These dishes are typically dressed with soy sauce and vinegar/rice vinegar.

Alert! : 27 Effects of Smoking on Body

This Interactive info from Healthline would be an eye opener for many. We all knew it “Smoking is injurious to health” But how?

Click on the image below or this link to go to their page where you can this interactive chart allowing the reader to pick the side effect they want to learn more about.

27 effects smoking


Courtesy & Source: Maggie Danhakl & Healthline

Know : List of Citrus Fruits

 

List of Citrus Fruits

Citrus fruits are notable for their fragrance, partly due to flavonoids and limonoids (which in turn are terpenes) contained in the rind, and most are juice-laden. The juice contains a high quantity of citric acid giving them their characteristic sharp flavour. The genus is commercially important as many species are cultivated for their fruit, which is eaten fresh, pressed for juice, or preserved in marmalades and pickles.

They are also good sources of vitamin C and flavonoids. The flavonoids include various flavanones and flavones. Citrus trees hybridise very readily – depending on the pollen source, plants grown from a Persian Lime‘s seeds can produce fruit similar to grapefruit. Thus all commercial citrus cultivation uses trees produced by grafting the desired fruiting cultivars onto rootstocks selected for disease resistance and hardiness.

Common
name(s)
Image Taxonomic
name/constituents
Amanatsu Citrus kawanonatsudaidai fruit.jpg Citrus natsudaidai
Balady citron
Israel citron
Braverman1.JPG Citrus medica
Bergamot orange Bergamotfruit.jpg Citrus bergamia
Bitter orange
Seville orange
Sour orange
Bigarade orange
Marmalade orange
Citrus aurantium.jpg Citrus × aurantium
Blood orange BloodOrange.jpg Citrus × sinensis
Buddha’s hand
Bushukan
Fingered citron
Buddhas hand 2.jpg Citrus medica var. sarcodactylis
Calamondin
Calamansi
Mixed Calamondin-Calamansi.jpg × Citrofortunella mitis
Cam sành CamSanh (9).JPG Citrus reticulata ×maxima
Citron Citrus medicus fruit.jpg Citrus medica
Yuzufruit.jpg Citrus subg. Papeda
Clementine Clementines whole, peeled, half and sectioned.jpg Citrus reticulata
Corsican citron
Desert Lime Citrus glauca bushes.jpg Citrus glauca
Etrog Etrog without Pitom.jpg Citrus medica
Finger lime Citrus australasica green fruit1.JPG Citrus australasica
Florentine citron Citrus medica
Grapefruit Citrus paradisi (Grapefruit, pink) white bg.jpg Citrus × paradisi
Greek citron Ordang multi.JPG Citrus medica
Hyuganatsu
Konatsu
Tosakonatsu
New Summer Orange
Hyuganatsu cut.jpg Citrus tamurana
Iyokan
Anadomikan
Iyokan on tree.jpg Citrus × iyo
Kabosu Kabosu.jpg Citrus sphaerocarpa
Kaffir lime Citrus hystrix dsc07772.jpg Citrus hystrix
Key lime Ripekeylime.jpg Citrus aurantiifolia
Kinnow Harvest Kinnow.jpg Citrus nobilis × Citrus deliciosa
Kiyomi Kiyomi.JPG Citrus unshiu × Citrus sinensis
Kumquat Quinotos.jpg Citrus japonica
Lemon Lemon.jpg Citrus limon
Lime Limes whole and halved.jpg
Mandarin orange
Mandarin
Mandarine
Mandarin Oranges (Citrus Reticulata).jpg Citrus reticulata
Meyer lemon Meyer Lemon.jpg Citrus × meyeri
Moroccan citron MoroccoEtrog.JPG Citrus medica
Myrtle-leaved orange tree Citrus myrtifolia 2.jpg Citrus myrtifolia
Orange
Sweet orange
OrangeBloss wb.jpg Citrus × sinensis
Oroblanco
Sweetie
Sweetie (Citrus).jpg Citrus grandis × C. Paradisi/Citrus maxima/Citrus grandis
Persian lime
Tahiti lime
Bearss lime
Limes.jpg Citrus × latifolia
Pomelo
Pummelo
Pommelo
Shaddock
Citrus grandis - Honey White.jpg Citrus maxima orCitrus grandis
Ponderosa lemon PonderosaLemon.jpg Citrus limon × medica
Rangpur
Lemandarin
Rangpur limette.jpg Citrus × limonia
Round lime
Australian lime
Australian round lime
Citrus australis
Satsuma
Cold hardy mandarin
Satsuma mandarin
Satsuma orange
Christmas orange
Tangerine
Citrus unshiu 20101127 c.jpg Citrus unshiu
Shangjuan
Ichang lemon
Ichangfruit.jpg Citrus ichangensis ×C. maxima
Shonan Gold 湘南ゴールド 結果状況2.JPG Citrus flaviculpus hort. ex Tanaka (Ōgonkan)× Citrus unshiu
Sudachi Sudachi.png Citrus sudachi
Sweet limetta
Mediterranean sweet lemon
Sweet lemon
Sweet lime
Citrus limetta.jpeg Citrus limetta
Taiwan tangerine
Flat lemon
Hirami lemon
Thin-skinned flat lemon
Shikwasa-1.jpg Citrus × depressa
Tangelo
Honeybell
Minneola fruit 3.jpg C. reticulata × C. maxima or × C. paradisi
Tangerine TangerineFruit.jpg Citrus tangerina
Tangor Photo ortanique.JPG C. reticulata × C. sinensis
Ugli fruit Ugli.jpg Citrus reticulata ×Citrus paradisi
Yuzu Yuzufruit.jpg Citrus ichangensis ×C. reticulata

More…

Oranges were historically used for their high content of vitamin C, which prevents scurvy. Scurvy is caused by vitamin C deficiency, and can be prevented by having 10 milligrams of vitamin C a day. An early sign of scurvy is fatigue. If ignored, later symptoms are bleeding and bruising easily. British sailors were given a ration of citrus fruits on long voyages to prevent the onset of scurvy, hence the British nickname of Limey.

Pectin is a structural heteropolysaccharide contained in the primary cell walls of plants. Limes and lemons as well as oranges and grapefruits are among the highest in this level.

After consumption, the peel is sometimes used as a facial cleanser. A peel of lemons or orange is commonly used as a means to moisten medical cannabis when stored with it.

Before the development of fermentation-based processes, lemons were the primary commercial source of citric acid.

Citrus fruit intake is associated with a reduced risk of stomach cancer.Also, citrus fruit juices, such as orange, lime and lemon, may be useful for lowering the risk of specific types of kidney stones.

Grapefruit is another fruit juice that can be used to lower blood pressure because it interferes with the metabolism of calcium channel blockers.

Lemons have the highest concentration of citrate of any citrus fruit, and daily consumption of lemonade has been shown to decrease the rate of stone formation.

Know : Finding Adulterated Tea

Adulterated Tea

Left (Original)                                                       Right (Adulterated)

Tea is normally adulterated using re-colored used tea, waste (leftover leaves after straining the tea) is collected from tea stalls, dried in the sun, mixed with colours (water soluble coal tar dyes) and some amount of genuine tea to give it the flavour and this mixture is sold as loose tea

There is a simple test to detect if the tea has been adulterated. Take a blotting paper, wet it by sprinkling some water over it and then sprinkle the tea powder over it. If you come across yellow, orange or red spots on the blotting paper, then the tea has been adulterated by using artificial color. Pure tea leaves release color only when they are put into boiling water. Or simply add a teaspoon of tea dust to a glass of water. If you see any patches of colours(as shown in the image) then the tea is adulterated.

PS : We found this method on the internet, if you have any other methods please share it with us as a comment or a mail to helpdesk@propelsteps.com Not just for Tea, for any food we eat.